USGS HVO Press Release—Magnitude-4.7 earthquake south of the Island of Hawai‘i

Release Date:

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-4.7 earthquake located south of the Island of Hawai‘i on Monday, July 27, at 06:06 a.m., HST. The earthquake was centered about 20 km (12.4 miles) southeast of Nā‘ālehu, at a depth of 35 km (21.7 miles)

 A map showing its location is posted on the HVO website at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/. More details are available at the National Earthquake Information Center website at https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/hv72063082/.

Light shaking, with maximum Intensity of IV, has been reported across parts of the Island of Hawai‘i. At that intensity, significant damage to buildings or structures is not expected. The USGS "Did you feel it?" service (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/dyfi/) received over 400 felt reports within the first hour of the earthquake.

According to HVO acting-Scientist-in-Charge, David Phillips, the earthquake had no apparent effect on Kīlauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes. "We see no detectable changes in activity at the summits or along the rift zones of Mauna Loa or Kīlauea as a result of this earthquake. Aftershocks are possible and could be felt." HVO continues to monitor Mauna Loa and other Hawaiian volcanoes for any changes.

The depth, location, and recorded seismic waves of the earthquake suggest a source due to bending of the oceanic plate from the weight of the Hawaiian island chain, a common source for earthquakes in this area. Aftershocks are possible and could be felt.

According to the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center, there is no tsunami threat from this earthquake.

For information on recent earthquakes in Hawaii and eruption updates, visit the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory website at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/.

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Volcano updates, photos, maps, and recent earthquake data for Hawaii are posted on the HVO website at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo.

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