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Adverse water quality from a trio of historic mines in the Tulsequah River watershed, a tributary of the Taku River, have caused concern in local communities including Juneau, Alaska, and Atlin, British Columbia

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Real-time Streamflow of the Taku River Graph

Real-time Streamflow of the Taku River | Historical Water Quality Data | Summary of all Available Data

Adverse water quality from a trio of historic mines in the Tulsequah River watershed, a tributary of the Taku River, have caused concern in local communities including Juneau, Alaska, and Atlin, British Columbia. These mines operated in the early 1900s with the largest and last mine, Tulsequah Chief, closed in 1957. As these mines operated well before environmental laws were enacted, there was no mine remediation plan in place at their closure. The chronology of actions by government and mine ownership since 1957 is documented by Rivers Without Borders.  Like the Salmon, the Taku has glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). The Taku can even have two GLOFs in a given year depending on sub-glacial runoff and storage patterns. The USGS studied the Taku GLOFs from 1987 to 2004 as well as water quality from 1998 to 2003. This work is documented in a USGS publication. In the current study, the USGS began sampling the Taku River in May 2019.

Taku River Layout

Illustration detailing the Taku River layout.  (Public domain.)