Alaska Science Center

Wildlife, Fish, and Habitats

Filter Total Items: 32
Date published: August 22, 2017
Status: Active

Beak Deformities in Landbirds

Over the past 20 years, Alaskans have witnessed a startling increase of beak deformities among Black-capped Chickadees and other species of resident birds. This disease, called avian keratin disorder (AKD), is characterized by debilitating beak overgrowth and other abnormalities of keratinized tissues. Affected birds have difficulty feeding and preening, and may suffer high rates of mortality...

Date published: August 4, 2017
Status: Active

North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database

The North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database (NPPSD) includes more than 460,000 survey transects that were designed and conducted by numerous partners primarily to census seabirds at sea.

Date published: July 27, 2017
Status: Active

Goose Research

Over the past two decades the USGS Alaska Science Center has had a central focus on addressing science questions related to geese in Alaska.  Science information is needed for these species because all have undergone changes in population size through time and are important resources for subsistence and sport hunters in the state and outside of Alaska where these birds spend the winter.  The...

Date published: July 27, 2017
Status: Active

Dabbling and Diving Duck Research

Dabbling and diving ducks (such as the northern pintail, mallard, teal, and scaup) are highly migratory and widespread species throughout North America.  For many species, their migratory flyways through Asia and North America overlap in Alaska and northeastern Russia.  Population trends of these species are closely tracked through aerial surveys by management agencies.  Results from these and...

Date published: July 27, 2017
Status: Active

Sea Duck Research

At the USGS Alaska Science Center, research on sea ducks has been designed to anticipate and address priority information needs of management agencies.  Until recently, very little was known about sea ducks in Alaska in terms of migration patterns and general biology.  Therefore, much of our past work focused on individual species, their migration, population demography, and ecology to fill...

Date published: July 13, 2017
Status: Active

Wildlife Disease and Environmental Health in Alaska

Environmental health is defined by connections between the physical environment, ecological health, and human health. Current research within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recognizes the importance of this integrated research philosophy, which includes study of disease and pollutants as they pertain to both wildlife and humans. Due to its key geographic location and significant wildlife...

Date published: July 13, 2017
Status: Active

Landbird Research in Alaska

Beak Deformities, Boreal Partners in Flight and USGS Changing Arctic Ecosystems Boreal-Arctic Transition Zone.

Date published: July 13, 2017
Status: Active

Waterfowl Research

Scientists at the USGS Alaska Science Center have conducted research on waterfowl species (ducks, geese, and swans) in Alaska since the 1970s. Because Alaska is an international crossroads of migratory bird flyways, with millions of birds from Asia and North America breeding in Alaska each summer, USGS research has also taken place in adjacent countries (Russia, Japan, Canada, Mexico) and in...

Date published: July 13, 2017
Status: Active

Walrus Research

The Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) is one of 4 marine mammal species managed by the U.S. Department of Interior. The USGS Alaska Science Center conducts long–term research on Pacific walruses to inform local, state, national and international policy makers regarding conservation of the species and its habitat. The goal of our current research efforts is to refine and enhance...

Date published: July 13, 2017
Status: Active

Terrestrial Mammal Ecology Research

Understanding the population dynamics, predator/prey relationships and habitat ecology of large, terrestrial mammals is critical for the management of these wildlife species in Alaska and elsewhere around the world.

Date published: July 13, 2017
Status: Active

Shorebird Research

With its vast size, numerous huge embayments, and geographic position at a terminus of numerous migration pathways, Alaska is a critically important site for the world’s shorebirds. Thirty-seven shorebird species regularly breed in Alaska, and an additional 36 species have been recorded in the state. These numbers represent nearly a third of the world’s known shorebird species. Most of these...

Date published: July 13, 2017
Status: Active

Polar Bear Research

Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are one of 4 marine mammal species managed by the U.S. Department of Interior. The USGS Alaska Science Center leads long–term research on polar bears to inform local, state, national and international policy makers regarding conservation of the species and its habitat. Our studies, ongoing since 1985, are focused on population dynamics, health and...