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Electrical and electromagnetic geophysical surveys at Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, Chattahoochee, Florida, March 2018

January 4, 2022

Surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), electromagnetic induction (EMI), and self-potential (SP) data were acquired March 9 - 20, 2018 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, at the Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam near Chattahoochee, Florida. Eleven ERT profiles were acquired along the right (west) abutment, and immediately downstream, of the concrete, fixed-crest spillway located west of the lock to map geologic structure at depths up to 50 meters (m) using the Advanced Geosciences, Inc. SuperSting R8 resistivity meter. Frequency-domain electromagnetic induction data were acquired along approximately 9 line-kilometers with the Geophex GEM-2 system to map variations in structure up to about 10 m in depth. Self-potential data were acquired at 384 unique stations with Borin Stelth 3 copper-copper sulfate porous-pot electrodes and Keysight U1253B high-impedance multimeter to identify variations in subsurface hydrologic flow. This data release includes raw data for all methods as well as processed data and/or inverted resistivity models. Digital data from all methods are provided, and data fields are defined in respective data dictionaries. Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam is located on the Apalachicola River just south of the confluence of the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers along the Florida-Georgia border. Construction was completed in 1954 and impounds Lake Seminole. The dam has a long history of excessive seepage along the right abutment and below the fixed-crest spillway. Several karst features have been mapped over the years including sinkholes, both on land and along the lake bottom, and disappearing and reappearing streams. Such features were excavated and grouted during construction. Despite years of investigation of the dam foundation, there remains uncertainty on the flowpaths of water below the fixed-crest spillway and along the adjacent right abutment.