Contaminant Biology Program

Science Teams

The Contaminant Biology and Toxic Substances Hydrology combined programs work collaboratively to assess and differentiate the environmental contaminant and pathogen exposures that cause actual health risks versus those that are only perceived. Ten specialized teams of hydrologists, geologists, chemists, biologists, and geographers work together in the field and laboratories across the United States.

Filter Total Items: 10
Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Food Resources Science Team

The team studies the movement of toxicants and pathogens associated with food production through watersheds and aquifers, to water resources where exposure can occur. That information is used to understand if there are adverse effects upon exposure and to develop decision tools to protect health.

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Science Team

The team studies toxicants and pathogens in water resources from their sources, through watersheds, aquifers, and infrastructure to human and wildlife exposures. That information is used to develop decision tools that protect human and wildlife health.

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Toxins and Harmful Algal Blooms Science Team

The team develops advanced methods to study factors driving algal toxin production, how and where wildlife or humans are exposed to toxins, and ecotoxicology.  That information is used to develop decision tools to understand if toxin exposure leads to adverse health effects in order to protect human and wildlife health....

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Minerals Science Team

The Minerals Integrated Science Team focuses on contaminant exposures in the environment that might originate from mineral resource activities including, transportation, storage, extraction and waste management. Perceived health risks to humans and other organisms will be distinguished from actual risks, if any. If actual risks are identified this Team will inform how to...

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Land Stewardship Science Team

The Land Stewardship Integrated Science Team focuses on the potential for contaminant exposures in the environment that might originate from land management activities like wildfire and dust suppression, vector control (for example: mosquitos and rodents) and invasive species (Asian carp and nuisance plants). Perceived health risks to humans and other organisms will be...

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Immunomodulation Science Team

The Immunomodulation Integrated Science Team focuses on contaminant and pathogen exposures in the environment that might influence the immune systems of wildlife, livestock, and companion animals. In collaboration with public-health officials, the Team also addresses potential human-health risks stemming from similar exposures.  If actual risks are identified, this Team will inform...

Date published: August 23, 2018
Status: Active

Fishing and Hunting Science Team

The Fishing and Hunting integrated science team focuses on contaminant and pathogen exposures in the environment that could impact the presence and vitality of fish and wildlife populations that drive commercial, recreational and subsistence activities such as hunting and fishing. If actual risks are identified this project will inform how to economically and effectively minimize...

Date published: July 12, 2018
Status: Active

Ecologically-Driven Exposure Pathways Science Team

The Ecologically-Driven Exposure pathways team identifies internal and external pathways and processes that can alter exposure and toxicity of contaminants and pathogens to wildlife the environment. That information is used to distinguish actual health risks to fish and wildlife. If actual risks are identified this project will inform how to economically and effectively minimize risk...

Date published: April 18, 2018
Status: Active

Energy Science Team

 

The Energy Integrated Science Team focuses on the potential for contaminant exposures in the environment that might originate from energy resource activities including, transportation, storage, extraction, waste management and restoration. Perceived health risks to humans and other organisms will be distinguished from actual risks, if any.  If actual risks are identified...

Date published: April 30, 2017
Status: Completed

Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Science Team

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States and provides critical resources to fish, wildlife and people. For more than a decade, recreational fish species have been plagued with skin lesions and intersex conditions (the presence of male and female sex characteristics in the same fish) that biologists attributed to exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)....

Contacts: Kelly Smalling