Lucas Schilder, Texas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Lucas Schilder, Texas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Detailed Description

One of the most memorable moments of Lucas Schilder thesis research thus far was the first juniper titmouse capture and banding of study. After months of reading literature on various capture techniques, ucas's first capture in the field was both a relief and tangible indicator that he was on the right track.

Pinyon-juniper woodlands are an extensive vegetation community found throughout the western United States, where climate and land use practices have significantly altered woodland range and density. This expansion has created federal and state agency interest in tree removal and thinning, with the goals of reducing fuel loads and restoring historic stand structure. Conversely, the high proportion of avian pinyon-juniper specialists included on national and state lists of concern has created a need to balance thinning targets with conservation of these woodland-obligate bird species. We are documenting these changes in central New Mexico to provide resource managers with quantified avian and vegetation community response to thinning and inform conservation efforts for the benefit multiple species. Additionally, we are color banding juniper titmice to supplement the community analysis by examining effects of thinning on survival, site fidelity, and territoriality for a focal species of high conservation concern.

Details

Image Dimensions: 1000 x 1333

Date Taken:

Location Taken: US

Credits

Texas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Source:


Texas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit