100 Years of Service to Migratory Bird Conservation in North America

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This year, the USGS is celebrating the 100-year anniversary of their Bird Banding Laboratory and a century of advancing avian conservation science. Banding is one of the oldest and most important techniques used for studying individual birds. John Tautin, former Chief of the Bird Banding Lab and co-author of Bird Banding in North America: The First Hundred Years, will join Antionio Celis-Murillo, acting Chief of Bird Banding Lab, in discussing the first hundred years of the lab as well as a live Q&A session with the audience.
 

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Date Taken:

Length: 00:57:36

Location Taken: Laurel, MD, US

Video Credits

John Tautin
 

Transcript

0:16

0:39
Can you hear me now?
0:42
OK, I'm ready to go.
0:51
Request to control and I'm waiting for your.
0:56
Welcome
1:02
to the first little presentation to celebrate the 100
1:05
year anniversary of the USGS bird banding laboratory
1:08
and a century of advancing avian conservation science.
1:12
My name is Antonio cell is Mario I'm
1:15
m the acting chief of the bird banding lab.
1:18
And today we are going
1:22
to have a presentation with John Toten.
1:25
He's a retired and former chief of the
1:28
bird banding laboratory during 1989 to 2000
1:32
and he will discuss the history of the bird banding
1:36
laboratory, highlighting historical events and figures that shaped
1:40
the bird banding laboratory.
1:41
Before
1:47
the presentation starts.
1:50
I'm gonna try to give you a little bit of.
1:54
It Contacts on
1:57
the presentation and talk about the
2:01
preventing lab USGS rebounding love
2:04
is integrated scientific program established in 19
2:08
20 and it was established to support the collection archiving
2:12
g, management and dissemination of information from
2:15
bandit and Mark Birds in North America I
2:19
I think it's very important to emphasize that the USGS bird banding laboratory.
2:23
In collaboration with the bird banding office in
2:27
Canada, managed the bird North American bird banding program.
2:31
For those
2:35
who are not familiar with the bird banding
2:38
method or bending techniques, bird banding
2:42
is the attachment of a small aluminum
2:45
band to the leg, and this band has
2:49
unique numbers that allow the identification of the
2:53
individual of the bird later. This birds
2:56
with bands can be identified due to recapture
2:59
being found dead or cited free.
3:01
Pending allow scientist to track behavior migration
3:07
lifespan, populations, disease and environmental contaminants
3:11
or obtain other important biological and ecological information.
3:15
Information gathered through the bird banding laboratory
3:19
assist with avian management and conservation, which
3:22
is especially important for the protection and recovery of birds
3:25
that are endangered or threatened.
3:27
So today.
3:29
The bird banding
3:34
lab is able to manage trying to make
3:38
some changes here on this light
3:41
Today the bourbon in lab has a really large database
3:44
over 100 years and we have more
3:48
than 75 million bandings in our archive more
3:51
e than 5 million encounters and
3:54
we usually distribute annually 1.2 million
3:57
banks to permitted vendors. We also have.
4:00
100,000 encounters annually
4:03
and currently we
4:06
manage 7500 permitted vendors in the
4:10
US alone.
4:10
Our presenter
4:14
John Toten, who is the coeditor of bird banding in
4:17
North America book the first 100 years.
4:21
He's right now retired
4:24
d biologist now is living on a farm in or is not western
4:29
Pennsylvania, close to where he grew up, roaming field and
4:32
Stream. He's early interest in fishing wildlife. Let him to
4:35
Penn State where 1969 here in a bachelor's degree in psychology after
4:39
r serving two years in the US Army and earning a
4:42
Masters degree in wildlife science from Utah State University
4:47
John joined the US Fish and Wildlife Service and later the
4:50
USGS for 30 year career.
4:51
In Migratory Bird Conservation.
4:53
Much of faith associated with the collection and analysis
4:56
per banding in his last position. He was the
5:00
6th chief of the USD Esprit banding laboratory
5:04
In retirement, John has served as an executive director of
5:07
the Purple Martin Conservation Association.
5:10
Regional coordinator for Pennsylvania SEC. Breeding bird
5:13
Atlas. The director of the French Creek
5:16
Valley Conservancy, director of the Crawford County Agricultural
5:20
Land Preservation Board and volunteer for many wildlife
5:23
Service including Erie, Burb Server, Tori Bird
5:27
banding project in Pennsylvania. Welcome John
5:30
and we're all happy to listen your presentation. We will address
5:34
questions at the end of the presentation.
5:36
Thank you Antonio
5:39
It's a pleasure to be here with everyone
5:42
and for most of my adult life, bird banding has
5:45
been part of it. I've used banding data
5:48
in scientific papers. I've banded birds and
5:51
most significantly, for several years. I was fortunate to
5:55
be chief of the USGS bird banding
5:58
laboratory. It was my dream job. I love
6:01
the program. I love the birds. I love the
6:05
people and it's my great pleasure.
6:06
This morning to talk to you about
6:09
the history of the program. So if I could have
6:12
next slide, please.
6:14
The story of bird banding
6:18
office. Now we call it the laboratory, the
6:21
story starts with the first bird
6:24
banding in North America. Paul Bartsch
6:29
Smithsonian Institution scientists at Washington DC
6:32
in 19, two banded, some black Crown night
6:35
Heron's along the Anacostia
6:38
River outside DC.
6:40
Bartsch was
6:44
Malik Ologist. He studied mollusks
6:47
His interest in the birds was secondary
6:50
He wanted to know if through the movement
6:54
of aquatic birds, aquatic snails might be
6:57
moved around, so he said about it in A
7:00
scientific manner with individually
7:03
numbered birds to identify each each
7:06
individual and the bands had a return to
7:09
Smithsonian Institution address on them.
7:11
Ann Bartz had some success he got
7:15
t some returns and then most
7:18
significantly next slide, Please He
7:22
published his results now and that
7:25
established him as the first bird Bander in
7:28
North America. I don't know. Weather March
7:32
went on to ban more birds
7:35
but he did foresee the application
7:38
of birds banding in the future and he made
7:41
a little recommendation that this technique be used by
7:45
other people.
7:45
Because, and I quote him
7:49
here, there are still many unsolved problems
7:52
about BirdLife. Next slide, please.
7:55
Others
7:58
had been thinking bout bird banding
8:02
notably Leon Cole from University of Michigan
8:05
Cole was an ichthyologist and he had marked introduced
8:09
carp with tags, and he saw the
8:13
application for bird studies
8:16
so colon others they got the programs going and by
8:19
the mid teens the bird banding in North
8:22
America was being organized by private organization called.
8:26
The American bird banding
8:29
Association next slide, please.
8:34
The government got involved in
8:38
the 1914, nineteen 16
8:41
when Bureau of biological survey biologist
8:44
named Alex Wetmore banded alot of water
8:47
file at the bear River marches in Utah. He was studying
8:51
duck sickness that we now
8:54
call Botulism and he got a lot of results. He banded
8:57
hundreds of Ducks. He got recoveries of ducks that indicated
9:01
where they came from, where they went, and that further underscored the value of this technique.
9:06
Next slide, please.
9:08
How
9:13
what more went on to become the
9:17
beloved 6 secretary of the Smithsonian
9:20
Institution? Next slide, please. These are some of the
9:24
early bands that were used in the program
9:27
prior to the establishment of the
9:30
bird banding office in 1920. Next slide, please.
9:35
Further case for federal
9:38
involvement came about in 1916 when the United
9:41
States and Canada entered into a treaty for the protection
9:44
of migratory birds. Now only the federal
9:48
government can enter into International
9:51
treaties. The treaty was implemented in 19
9:55
18 via the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which set
9:58
regulations governing all matters concerning
10:01
migratory birds, including a banding
10:05
Now, this does not constitute a.
10:07
Government takeover banding by any
10:11
means. This development was welcomed by the banding
10:15
community they saw the need for one
10:18
uniform system that everybody was working under and
10:21
d they envisioned a stable, adequately funded
10:24
and administrative program if it were
10:28
e to be housed in the government, and so
10:32
they said about to establish a banding office
10:35
in the Bureau biological survey.
10:37
And logically at Washington
10:41
n DC headquarters to establish the office, they
10:44
recruited the Frederick Charles
10:47
Lincoln. Lincoln was an exceptional
10:51
fellow. He was curator of birds at
10:55
the Museum of Natural History in Denver
10:58
and he'd been in that job since he was 21
11:01
years old. With time out for service during world
11:05
War One. As a pigeon expert in
11:08
the US Army signal core.
11:09
While Lincoln was back in his
11:12
position in 1920 when he was
11:16
tapped to come to Washington to stab
11:19
Lish, this office, presumably Alex Wetmore
11:23
had something to do with that because Wetmore had become acquainted with
11:27
Lincoln at the.
11:28
Museum in Colorado.
11:31
So beginning in 19
11:34
20, Lincoln laid the foundation for the North American bird banding
11:38
program by establishing the federal bird banding office
11:41
and office that we now call the bird banding
11:44
laboratory, and I'll refer to it as such
11:48
Lincoln had a daunting task before him
11:51
He was 28 years old. He did not have a college degree.
11:54
He did not have a plan
11:59
for organizing this office. He had no experience doing
12:03
that, but what he did have were remarkable degrees
12:07
of professionalism and vision and
12:10
dedication, and these qualities would assure his success
12:15
and set him up for outstanding career over the next
12:18
30 years.
12:19
Next, slide Lincoln had
12:22
to consider everything that one would in
12:25
developing a banding program. He had to develop a
12:29
numbering skiing. He had to
12:32
procure bands next slide please.
12:34
This slide up can we go back one
12:38
please? The picture on the right is an
12:41
interesting photo of a Ledger of band Or
12:45
orders back in 1922
12:48
The viewer can't read the lines there, but there's a line in
12:51
there that says a certain number of bands were ordered
12:56
from Guy Bandon Tag Company in Norristown
12:59
PA. That's 1922.
13:01
Guy band and tag company is still in
13:04
Business Today. Remarkable next slide please.
13:08
Because
13:12
the banding or capture any capturing birds for any
13:15
reason, including banding, was regulated by the federal
13:18
government. One needed a permit to do it so
13:22
o Lincoln had to set up a permitting process
13:26
and this is an example of
13:29
his permit happens to be his personal permit from
13:32
1922. Next slide.
13:35
He also had to consider
13:38
how records abandoned birds would be managed. This is how they
13:42
were formally managed with the American bird banding
13:45
Association. One card per banded bird with the information
13:48
on and where it was banded
13:51
and subsequent information if the bird was
13:55
recovered. This is an interesting one. I love this one because it was a Crow
13:59
Crow Banda near Berwyn, Pennsylvania, an
14:03
ot because it was stealing chickens.
14:07
Next slide, please.
14:09
All the subsequent Chiefs of
14:12
the bird banding office had to deal with
14:15
records management and spent a very important part of the program
14:19
for 100 years. Lincoln also had to
14:22
recruit bird banders this became
14:25
e very popular and the government saw its value
14:28
and they wanted people out there to band Birds
14:31
and accumulate their records from them. Next slide, please.
14:34
One of these banders, particularly new ones, had to
14:37
be educated in proper techniques and these
14:41
e old photos show a few techniques like the lady on the
14:44
right who appears to be holding a Robin
14:47
or some other thrush not
14:50
t using technique that we would consider good
14:53
today. Next slide, please.
14:55
Communication became immediately
14:59
very important in developing this program and
15:03
d Fortunately Lincoln was a exceptional communicator, he was
15:06
an excellent writer, and he and the fellow named
15:09
Prentice Baldwin wrote the first bird banding
15:13
manual, and Lincoln was also politically astute
15:17
He knew that if there was going to be continued support
15:20
for this program, it had to show results and
15:23
so early on he began publishing.
15:26
In this case, returns from banded birds
15:29
1923 to 1926 next
15:32
t slide please.
15:34
Perhaps his most
15:37
significant writing, though, was a series of bird banding
15:41
notes that he started. These were designed mainly
15:44
to communicate with a banders give them
15:48
m updated information on band supply new techniques, do's and
15:52
don'ts, etc. But they would serve over
15:55
the years as a Chronicle of what happened
15:58
in the bird banding program, and I think they
16:01
ran for about 46 years into the 1960s.
16:04
Next slide, please.
16:06
There are also important external developments in the
16:10
20s regional banding associations formed an
16:13
These were important because they provided community
16:17
for bird banders out there. They served as
16:20
occasions for training and exchange of
16:23
information and these associations could represent banders
16:27
back to the banning office regarding policy
16:30
etc. Very important development.
16:32
And is it Antonio previously
16:36
y mentioned a very significant development in 1923
16:39
Three was the development of a Canadian bird banding office
16:43
and the US and Canadian bird banding offices have
16:46
worked together since then using the same bands, the same
16:49
record formats similar policies
16:53
s, etc. And this made for one uniform
16:56
system and it prevented problems that
16:59
developed with banding programs in Europe where each
17:02
country had its own.
17:03
Program in sometimes
17:06
regions within countries had programs making it difficult
17:10
to cooperate and coordinate. Next slide please.
17:13
In the 1930s
17:16
is, as you can imagine, the Great Depression
17:20
affected bird banding as it did everything
17:23
g else, funds were tight, bands were short, there had
17:26
to be a moratorium placed on New Banders
17:29
Next slide please. Still there were
17:33
important developments. Bander named Margaret Nice
17:36
from Columbus, OH. Developed a technique
17:39
to mark individual birds using colored
17:43
celluloid bands. This enabled her to recognize an
17:46
individual in the field without having to recapture it
17:49
An read its leg band number, and this proved
17:53
to be a revolutionary technique for the time, but
17:56
it still used today. Still basic. Next slide please.
18:01
The program in the 30s had
18:04
developed to the point where the banning lab had
18:07
to start developing some Paula season one
18:10
concern, publication rights to bird banding data
18:13
Now think about this for a little bit the
18:16
e Bander.
18:17
Is conducting his or own banding
18:21
project into field using his or own funds and
18:25
resources? However, the Bander is platforming on
18:28
this federal system and receiving bans free
18:31
of charge from the federal government.
18:33
Eventually that led to
18:36
o the policy that because public
18:39
funds were involved, taxpayer funds banning
18:43
data should be in the public domain, and that's where
18:46
they remain today. There also had to be
18:51
a policy development regarding recaptures of banded birds
18:54
Bands were making most banded birds are not
18:58
recovered away from the banding site, however
19:01
many are recaptured by the band are.
19:04
Decided if they are marked and what to do with
19:07
all these records became an issue in the 30s
19:11
and because the technology wasn't there to handle
19:14
all of those potential
19:17
recovery captures, the banding lab had to develop
19:20
a policy where they did not take them in. This would
19:24
later prove to be a mistake
19:27
when in coming decades people realize how truly valuable those data are.
19:32
Lincoln was that really in his
19:35
prime in a 1930s he published some
19:39
books. He developed the flyways
19:42
concept and he developed a statistical
19:46
model for estimating birds populations
19:49
from band returns to truly
19:52
some significant accomplishments. Next slide, please.
19:56
There are also noteworthy external events
19:59
in the 30s. The Bureau of biological survey
20:03
created the vision of migratory waterfowl
20:06
Ducks Unlimited. the Premier waterfowl conservation
20:10
organization today was incorporated in 30s and International
20:14
Wild Duck Census was conducted and the
20:17
migratory bird hunting stamp Stamp Act was
20:21
passed. These sets the stage for
20:25
later waterfall interests, greatly influencing the bird
20:29
banding laboratory.
20:30
Next slide, please.
20:32
These influences didn't really come into play right away
20:35
though, because World War 2 broke out and as you
20:38
can imagine, that greatly affected the banding program
20:43
Metal for bands was short there
20:46
e had to be a moratorium placed on New Banders
20:49
And there
20:52
was also a significant development administratively
20:55
Next slide please.
20:57
The government decided to move a whole lot
21:01
of offices out of Washington to remote
21:04
are like locations in the US. Fish and
21:07
Wildlife Service then moved to Chicago, but the bird
21:10
banding office was moved to the Patuxet Research
21:14
efuge in Laurel, MD where we are
21:17
today and in the office remains next slide
21:21
please. This proved to be a real for two
21:25
of this move because it put the banding lab.
21:28
At a location with scientists
21:31
and Wildlife Managers who were using banding data and developing
21:35
models for analyzing banning data
21:38
generated a lot of synergy.
21:40
The
21:43
previous slide with the people
21:47
in their shows. The small staff that
21:50
was here at the banding lab in the
21:53
40s and I'm glad we put this up here
21:57
because my talk emphasizes the accomplishments of
22:00
the leaders, the Chiefs of the bird banding laboratory, but we
22:04
must always remember that working with them
22:07
or clerks biologists it specialists all
22:10
working together to make the program work.
22:12
These are some of them from the 40s. Next slide
22:16
please. Among those people that became to
22:20
the banding lab in the 40s was outstanding individual
22:23
named Chandler Robbins Chan was
22:26
s a conscientious objector in World War Two and he
22:31
had served Alternatively as a
22:34
biologist out here at protection and
22:38
Chan was a fixture in a banding program for many, many
22:42
decades, 65 years.
22:43
Who is the band? Are he organized banding projects
22:47
He established the North American breeding bird
22:50
survey and he accounts for his banning accounts for one
22:53
of the most interesting bird
22:56
stories ever that come out of the bird banding
23:00
world in. I think it was 1950
23:03
Chandler went to midway atoll in
23:06
the Pacific, any banded lace, an albatross
23:10
is, and he banned an albatross that would later become.
23:13
Known as wisdom named wisdom.
23:17
Wisdom has returned
23:20
to Midway Island Atoll to
23:24
nest for nearly 60
23:27
years now. It's been documented that she's raised at
23:32
least 35 chicks. The latest
23:35
record was that she was back at Midway Atoll
23:39
in November of 2000, and
23:42
sumably, she's now at see somewhere
23:45
We hope she can returns in 2020.
23:48
Because she would be about 70
23:51
or more years old. This is the kind of
23:56
story that you can't get without bird banding.
24:00
Next slide, please.
24:01
Lincoln remained charge of the program till about
24:05
1947 and then he retired after
24:08
having very distinguished karere. We can truly
24:11
call him the father of the North American bird banding
24:15
program. Next slide, please, Lincoln's
24:18
successor was a fellow named CEST Bull and he
24:22
came on board in 1948 at the time
24:25
e when funds were being restored, the banning program was
24:29
looking better. The bands were available. He had
24:32
more staff.
24:33
And there were some new technology on the
24:36
horizon here. Next slide please
24:39
e punch cards and this was
24:42
revolutionary in 1948 revolutionary way
24:46
y of manageing banding records. Next slide
24:49
please following South Lowe was a fellow named
24:52
Alan Duval and he was chief for about 10
24:56
years. Next slide please during
25:00
both low and evolves tenures, waterfall
25:03
management would come too.
25:05
Dominate bird banding and at that
25:08
stage for that have been set back in the 30s
25:11
but it really really came to bear back in the
25:15
50s. There this was for a number of reasons
25:18
Following World War Two arms and ammunition
25:21
came a male available and there was a resurgence
25:24
in interest in hunting Ducks.
25:26
There were surplus aircraft available for waterfowl
25:30
surveys. GI Bill sent a lot of people to college, some of them
25:34
became wildlife managers
25:37
for waterfowl. Flyway Councils were formed funding
25:40
g was available in a preseason pre
25:44
hunting season. Duck banding program was started
25:47
and very soon the most
25:51
popular 100 duck, the Mallard.
25:52
Very soon became the
25:56
most banded Bird and I think may still be.
25:59
Next slide, please.
26:02
This interest in the
26:05
waterfall management stimulated need
26:09
for more better processing of
26:12
banning records and so we start to see some modernization record keeping
26:16
at the bird banding laboratory. And this was also
26:19
prompted by a disasters fire that
26:22
ad destroyed a lot of old paper banding records
26:25
So everybody got on board and said we have to
26:29
modernize here and go electronic.
26:31
Next slide
26:34
please. Earl Baysinger became chief of the bird banding laboratory
26:37
in 1964 and He
26:40
implemented a lot of change
26:44
Earl was very energetic and engaging Fellow
26:47
and he challenged Banning
26:51
convention. He establish new policies and
26:54
procedures. He greatly promoted bird banding
26:58
and gave it much greater visibility upper
27:01
r level official.
27:02
Officials in the fishing live service Department interior
27:05
took notice and in 19
27:08
68 next slide, please.
27:11
The bird banding laboratory got a new
27:14
home in a brand new home and gave her some laboratory here at the
27:17
Patuxet Wildlife Research Center
27:20
and we're still housed here today.
27:24
Next slide, please
27:27
basically took us job in Washington with endangered species
27:30
and in 1971 George Uncle became
27:33
e the 5th Bubl chief. Next slide please.
27:37
During his 10 year non game
27:40
bird banding became of age, it became much more
27:44
prominent and also during
27:47
his 10 year there was expansion of
27:51
international cooperation in bird banding in the US
27:55
Bird banding laboratory was very instrumental in helping
27:58
Brazil develop its national banding program.
28:00
Next slide, please.
28:03
The rise of non
28:06
game bird banding by no means diminished game bird
28:09
banding, though there was a big
28:12
series of Mallard reports that came out in the 19
28:16
70s, and they're very technical and advanced
28:19
and they were stimulated in part next slide
28:22
by the development of new
28:26
statistical models for analyzing bird banding
28:29
data. They've been a quiet revolution since about 60
28:32
around the world, with different people developing
28:36
very robust models.
28:37
For scientists to use in analyzing
28:40
bird banding data and much of that development in
28:43
the future would occur right here at the Patuxet wildlife
28:46
Research Center. Next slide, please.
28:49
They are also very
28:52
significant. Other advancements influences during the 80s there were
28:56
e technological advances. Radio transmitters were developed
29:00
At first these were large, clunky
29:03
devices that could only be carried by large birds.
29:06
Then the Endangered Species Act stimulated
29:10
interest in the banning of endangered
29:13
species. There was a significant increase of ornithologists at colleges
29:16
and universities more
29:20
e ornithological work being done by agencies and Anna number of businesses particularly
29:24
y environmental consultants, were taking a bird
29:28
banding when bird banding also became very
29:31
important tool in environmental education. And of course
29:34
there was that new technological development, the desktop computer.
29:37
That began to
29:40
influence operations at the bird banding laboratory next
29:43
t slide, please.
29:44
I became the 6th chief of the bird banding
29:47
laboratory and about 1980
29:50
and during my 10 year there continued to
29:55
be great advances in bird banding particularly
29:59
y externally driven advances. Next slide please.
30:02
For one, we
30:06
were involved with international programs
30:09
We hosted delegations from China
30:12
from Russia from I
30:15
believe Brazil again. Next slide, please.
30:18
And in turn this a
30:21
a international cooperation benefited us. We were invited to go
30:26
to technical conferences that were being held in
30:29
Europe to develop ever greater
30:32
models for analyzing banning data. And we were invited to participate in
30:36
those bring back the information and
30:40
apply it in the North American program next
30:43
t study please. And these new
30:46
developments with statistical models.
30:49
Set the stage for the development of some very
30:52
large scale cooperative banding programs in
30:55
North America and
30:58
d this one of those programs was monitoring
31:02
avian productivity and survivorship that was developed by
31:05
David Desanti at the Institute for bird populations
31:08
out in California. This was the
31:12
first really large scale project
31:15
where Banders were banding birds during the breeding season.
31:19
Across
31:22
North America using standardized methods
31:26
s and pooling data and Maps is still
31:29
going strong.
31:30
Next slide please some of the same
31:33
people that were behind the development of the Maps programs
31:37
s were behind the development of what was called
31:40
the North American Bird Banding Council.
31:42
Its mission or goal was
31:45
to establish training standards for banders
31:48
in North America and it proved to
31:52
be a great success. It's still in existence
31:55
and they have trained many, many banders in proper
31:58
banning techniques. Next slide, please.
32:01
There was a political
32:05
development in 1993 that would greatly
32:08
affect the bird banding laboratory and I was there at the time
32:12
and at this time I
32:16
wasn't prepared for what would happen here. Bruce Babbitt became.
32:20
Secretary of the interior
32:24
and Babbitt said about to form a new agency within
32:27
interior, called the National Biological survey, and he wanted
32:31
to pattern it after the highly respected US Geological
32:35
Survey. It was going to be the biological
32:38
counterpart. He had no authority or appropriation from Congress
32:42
to do this. So he said about using his
32:45
administrative powers to do that, and he accomplished
32:48
it by pulling the research and survey functions.
32:51
Out of the other interior agencies
32:54
like the Fish and Wildlife Service and
32:57
the Park Service, and he placed him all in this
33:01
new national biological service and the
33:04
bird banding laboratory was caught up in and went into
33:07
this new agency. Well sounded good from
33:10
the start, but Babbitt soon ran
33:13
afoul of Western Governors
33:17
and senators for implementing very aggressive
33:20
policies on public lands and.
33:21
After a power shift in Congress in 19
33:24
94, Congress stripped the NBS if
33:28
its identity and place it in the US Geological
33:31
Survey. Next slide, please
33:34
Well, this was a radical change for the bird banding
33:38
office formally and wildlife agencies now in the
33:41
geology agency, and it was an uncomfortable
33:45
fit initially for both sides.
33:47
Fortunately, though
33:50
the NBS and then followed up by GS had
33:53
the wisdom to evaluate the
33:56
banding program and they.
33:59
Commissioned a panel of experts to review the bird banding
34:04
laboratory, and that panel came out with a final
34:07
report and it proved to be one of the best
34:11
things that ever happened for the bird banding laboratory. The panel affirmed
34:15
the importance of bird banding and
34:18
made really solid sound. Recommendations for
34:21
improving it and carrying it on into the future next
34:24
t slide, please.
34:26
One of the big things
34:29
they wanted done was an overhaul of the massive
34:32
computer system that was here that would prove to
34:35
be a daunting task, but one very
34:38
good step along the way was that we developed
34:42
a one 800 telephone number for reporting bird
34:45
nds as soon as we
34:48
s we implemented it was immediate success and basically it doubled the
34:51
rate at which the public reported the finding of
34:55
banded birds. Next slide, please.
34:57
I left the bird banding laboratory
35:01
in 2002. I retired there was a
35:04
a lot of unfinished business in the development of a new
35:07
computer system, but the new
35:10
chief Monica Thomas you came on board in 2000
35:13
would carry that development forward Monica
35:16
a had good experiences, a bird bander she had good leadership
35:20
skills. She had good administrative skills
35:23
and she led the bird banding laboratory into developing
35:27
online services for banders.
35:29
She actually Advanced International
35:32
cooperation through the.
35:35
Dear Western Hemispheric
35:38
c banding network next slide please.
35:40
She was also helped along by
35:43
another very important advisory report from
35:46
what was then developed a federal
35:49
l Advisory Committee on the bird banding laboratory as the
35:53
e Buckley reported previously. Done this
35:56
s committee affirmed the importance of bird banding
35:59
and made solid recommendations
36:03
for advancing it, its operations and policy
36:06
y's next slide, please.
36:08
In 2008, Bruce Peter John became
36:12
the 8th bird banding lab
36:15
chief. Bruce had a lot of experience in migratory birds. He was
36:18
inexperienced banders. He had coordinated programs such
36:21
as the North American breeding bear
36:24
r bird survey and Bruce continued
36:28
these developments in the banding lab next slide, please.
36:32
Under his tenure
36:35
they went from 8 one 800 number being
36:38
the primary way to report bird bands to
36:41
online reporting. Next slide, please.
36:44
Bruce also continued to
36:47
support the development of the western hemispheric bird
36:51
banding network, so things kept
36:54
rolling along right through. Bruce is tenure next slides
36:57
pre please. Are there also important
37:00
technical developments during Thomas Ian Peter Johns 10
37:04
0 years finally very small devices tracking devices called
37:08
Geo locators were developed and were able to be placed
37:11
on small songbirds for the first time.
37:14
Next slide, please.
37:16
The technology got even better and they started
37:20
to be developed. These cooperative tracking System 1
37:23
called Modis, which involves A
37:26
series of stations picking
37:30
up signals from banded our radio.
37:33
Of Mark birds, let's say
37:37
next slide, please.
37:38
Bruce
37:42
Peter John retired in the 2019
37:46
that was the last year of the bird banding laboratory
37:50
s 1st century of service to migratory bird
37:53
conservation and what a century. It was 100
37:56
years of continuous progress made by generations
37:59
of BBL staff supported by their parent
38:03
agencies. Partnered with the banding community
38:06
Together, they responded to challenges they adopted
38:09
d new technologies.
38:10
They updated procedures and policies to
38:14
assure the continued success of bird banding
38:17
that they did so without fail for 100
38:20
years is a remarkable story an it is Ben
38:24
en my great pleasure to tell you that story
38:28
Now we're going to turn eventually here to
38:31
take a look to the future.
38:34
There's a new generation of leadership and
38:37
staff at the bird banding laboratory. They have energy they
38:40
y have vision. They had the same dedication that all their predecessors
38:45
did, and in a forthcoming presentation, Antonio
38:49
Salas Mario was going to give us an exciting look at
38:52
the future at what's coming next with bird banding in the
38:55
bird banding laboratory, and I wish them great
39:00
success. The mission of the bird banding laboratory
39:03
remains very, very important.
39:05
For if the ghost of
39:08
Paul Bartsch might be here and
39:11
say there are still many
39:15
unsolved problems about bird life.
39:17
Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you
39:21
today about bird banding. Ann will turn it back
39:24
over to Tony or
39:27
someone here and again. Tony, thank you for the
39:30
operation opportunity speak
39:33
and we wish you great success in the
39:37
future. Thank you very much. John Ann. I think
39:41
it's remarkable to see your presentation
39:44
an particularly your work on looking
39:47
g at the history of the bird banding lab.
39:49
I think it is, it's
39:52
y impressive to see. Like you said, how they
39:56
bird banding lab have been able to
40:00
remain the main source of this banding information
40:04
and allow for great successes overtime
40:08
e. I really when I see
40:11
the whole path together into one presentation
40:14
it's very obvious that the bubl pass through
40:18
a bunch of hoops overtime.
40:20
And hoops that they were very important
40:23
not just for the lab or for everyone
40:26
like World War Two like great
40:30
Recession. Things like that
40:33
They were basically pose challenges to everyone. However, the
40:36
bird banding lab and the good science
40:40
that was bringing kept.
40:42
Going and the most important
40:45
thing, continue getting better and better and better
40:49
And as you said before, we are going
40:52
to have a series of presentations coming in
40:55
the next few months and is going to be
40:58
basically impart this was
41:02
s specifically the history of the BBL the first 100 years
41:05
and the next presentation we're going to have presenters
41:08
that are going to highlight the
41:12
new advances that distinguish the BBL of today.
41:15
And we're going to finish with a third
41:19
rd presentation at the end of the year
41:22
Or date is still not firmed confirmed, but
41:25
he's going to talk about what is the future of the
41:29
bubl. Thank you very much, John. For your presentation. I
41:33
think we have some time for questions and for
41:36
those who have questions we can remember that you
41:39
can go into the Q&A an add your
41:43
questions and they moderate yrs here will allow us to
41:46
select those questions.
41:47
For now, I see that we have
41:50
two questions in our queue, a box and
41:54
I'm going to tell you the question for you, John and the
41:57
first question is what is your most
42:00
favorite experience with bending?
42:02
Most
42:05
favorite experience.
42:07
There were many, but I think 1
42:10
ne of the outstanding one was.
42:12
I going back to my college
42:16
days. I analyzed a set of Canada Goose
42:19
banding data for my Masters degree
42:22
and after I finish that my parents gave
42:25
me a print of nicely framed print
42:29
of a Canada Goose for Christmas
42:32
present in the artist who painted
42:36
that painting was fellow named John Ruth
42:39
and he was a prominent wildlife artist from Ohio at the time.
42:42
Now later I went to work as junior
42:46
biologist into bird banding laboratory
42:50
and I had assignment a couple of years to go
42:53
to Canada to band birds and abandoned a lot of
42:56
Ducks. Thousands of Ducks, including a lot of Bluewing teal.
42:59
Then one day back in the office at the
43:02
banding laboratory I was reviewing some recent recoveries
43:06
of banded birds, and I noted that Hey, I
43:09
got 1. One of my blue wing teal
43:12
banded in Alberta, Canada had been recovered
43:15
in Venezuela Vol places so
43:19
and then when I read in detail.
43:22
It was reported recovered by jaune
43:25
Ruth, and the painter.
43:27
And this was remarkable
43:31
for a couple in a couple of ways. One it shows the connectivity
43:34
between Bluewing teal's nesting grounds
43:38
and this wintering grounds. But it also showed that
43:42
often bird banding connects people and
43:45
I was so excited about it. I think I wrote Ruth in A
43:48
letter about it to talk about it, so that's
43:51
one of the memorable ones for me.
43:53
Thank you, John. I think that's a great
43:57
great answer and I think I will take advantage and
44:00
also answer these when and what I can say in
44:03
n my case, my favorite experience with banding
44:07
is in actually keep happening every
44:10
day, every time I'm in the field with birds
44:13
is to being able to see the smiles of
44:17
the people who is working with
44:20
birds no matter where you are, no matter where you are working
44:23
or which species you are studying.
44:25
You can always see the smiles of the
44:28
people when they're bending, which I think is really it fills
44:32
s me of happiness to see that in attracts me more
44:35
and more to Burr bending activities
44:40
There is another question in the
44:43
chat an is what is the most unique band
44:46
recovery that of?
44:48
Are the
44:51
most unique when their event there are so
44:54
many interesting ones oddities
44:58
I recall years ago that abandoned bird was
45:02
caught by a clam. It must have stepped into
45:06
a clam that had its shell open, so there are lots and lots
45:09
of these, but I think you would have to go back to the
45:12
one I mentioned previously. This albatross named
45:16
Wisdom Chan Robbins Bandit in 1956.
45:18
Anne wisdom is presumably still
45:21
out there.
45:22
Alive.
45:24
Yeah, I agree with you I
45:27
I think the wisdom is probably
45:30
one of the most amazing stories
45:33
that not just reflects how important is bird banding
45:36
but also it shows the type of
45:40
information that we get because that's sort of like the only way to keep
45:44
track these long-term studies and learn
45:47
more about the lifespan of birds there
45:51
e is another question that we have, which is how
45:54
has the number of incoming change.
45:56
Over time an ajani's if
45:59
you let me, I will talk about this one please
46:03
e do an one thing that it's being
46:07
incredible is to see that
46:10
the reports of those banded birds from the
46:14
public from scientists.
46:15
From hunters specifically it
46:19
t keeps increasing overtime. And of course
46:22
our partners. They use Fish and Wildlife Service, have been making a great
46:26
effort with hunters trying
46:29
to educate them and encourage them to
46:33
report those bands.
46:34
And that is mostly for waterfall
46:39
species. However, in the last 1020
46:42
years we've seen an increase of.
46:45
People who
46:48
love birds and they love to do very
46:51
watching and because of that we have thousands of
46:55
people doing bird watching on weekends during
46:59
the day. Even at night it's
47:02
s impressive that they are always searching for birds bird
47:05
d watching and those are the guys who always find birds in the
47:09
field and they report their sightings. So our
47:14
reporting rate.
47:15
It keeps increasing every day
47:18
and we expect that it will more because so far what I've
47:23
seen we will have more people engaged
47:26
in birds or time.
47:28
We have
47:32
more questions here.
47:35
I have here a comment that says
47:39
yes, they were very happy with the answer that birds connect
47:43
people. John, do you want to mention something about the
47:47
connection birds and people?
47:49
As you
47:52
said, bird banding puts a smile on everyone
47:57
s face and.
47:59
The connections grow
48:02
between Banders and sometimes people who recover
48:05
the birds. My example with the Blue Wing teal
48:09
but maybe even more important people to
48:13
people. Connections occur when
48:16
banded birds move from one country
48:19
Canada US into
48:23
to Latin America. Maybe all the way down and
48:27
to Brazil and places like that.
48:29
What this demonstrates then, is that
48:32
these migratory birds are an international
48:35
resource. They belong to everybody. Everybody in the Americas an
48:39
everybody should be concerned about them and appreciate
48:42
them, and so over the years
48:45
s there, banning has.
48:47
Provided the basis for biologists
48:51
in South America and Central America to get together
48:55
with biologists in North American and these have proven to
48:58
be very, very important connections
49:02
to promote conservation of international migratory birds.
49:06
Yeah, that's great. Another thing I want to mention
49:10
is that in recent years, we've
49:14
seen how.
49:15
Bree populations appeared to be in decline
49:19
and in addition to that we in general we see
49:23
more and more ecological crisis out there, and I
49:27
think more than ever, the bird banding data
49:31
because has the capacity to
49:34
examine long-term population trends and
49:38
long term data is
49:41
s really putting us in
49:44
great momentum for.
49:45
Keep working
49:49
on the bird banding practices. Keep encouraging
49:53
all those people out there who are interested in
49:57
birds and getting engaged in involving bird banding
50:01
and reporting their birds
50:04
So it seems like as we
50:07
go in the near future, the bird banding lab will
50:10
become more and more important overtime
50:14
and we just hope that it will just.
50:16
Keep increasing the number
50:19
of Panthers. Keep increase the number
50:22
of birds banded out there and the reporting rate for
50:25
those birds, it's critical
50:28
that this technique in the bird banding laboratory
50:31
that supports people using this technique continue
50:35
It's ever more important and bird banding
50:38
as it has been for over 100 years now
50:41
remains fundamentally important in migratory
50:44
bird conservation.
50:46
We have a few other questions in
50:50
the chat and one is how can people report a band
50:54
today and I will answer that. John yes
50:58
and Luckily today we have a really nice system on the
51:01
Web which is rapport band.gov you can
51:04
just type in on any browser
51:08
w.reportband.gov and we have the ability to
51:11
receive your report. It's a very simple system
51:14
you just find the number. Remember those bands have unique numbers.
51:17
You can put the bands in the
51:21
report it gives it asking for a little bit of information and it
51:25
immediately brings you the information of the banding so you
51:28
u as reported have both the information of the
51:32
bird bandit and then you report combine into a
51:36
certificate so.
51:38
Just remember report band that golf or just
51:41
going to Google and search for how to report
51:44
abandoned. You will see our link always
51:47
first an great system to report a band.
51:51
We have another one. It says. How can
51:54
the community get involved with bird banding?
51:57
Can I join? I will answer that
52:00
question so please nowadays I think
52:03
the easiest way to get involved in Burr banding is
52:07
s to search around your refugees they're
52:12
always buried observatories, refugees or specific
52:15
c long-term banding stations, all distributed
52:19
across North America, so just
52:22
ask your local murder
52:25
or send us an email and we will.
52:27
Connect you with those are close to you
52:30
Who are professionals who have a long
52:33
term banding station and that they.
52:37
Can really show you and help you to get
52:40
engaging to bear banding. I think it's a great
52:43
experience. I definitely recommend that you go and check
52:46
these observatories and refuges for
52:50
bending activities. Yeah, many of them
52:53
need volunteer assistance.
52:54
Yes.
52:55
Someone is asking if
52:59
the one 800 number is still functional and I
53:02
will say that at least in the United
53:05
States, the one 800 number we
53:08
had in John mentioned around the
53:11
2000s, we had one 800 number for
53:14
reporting birds there was. It was 100 band
53:18
Ann. You were able to report by phone but nowadays
53:22
s we move into Internet option and
53:26
we don't receive reports over the phone.
53:28
However, Canada they
53:31
still receive reports through one 800
53:35
number. So yeah, it's not functional in the US, but dysfunctional in Canada.
53:38
We have another
53:41
question. I think this is going to be the last one in the
53:45
question is are there any other very old birds that
53:48
were discovered?
53:49
Now John, any answer for this
53:53
win? Yes, I just
53:57
I think yesterday here at the bird banding laboratory I
54:00
I was informed that there is a new age record
54:03
for the Flamingo in the United States
54:06
and I think the New Age record
54:10
is something like 47 or 49
54:13
years. Remarkable yes and just
54:16
t following your comment, John in the bird banding lab website.
54:19
We have a section about
54:23
Longevity Records, an basically over 100
54:27
years and we've been collecting all the data and banding and the
54:30
encounters or recaptures and we have
54:33
information about the records
54:36
for every species in North America
54:39
So if you want to know more information, go
54:43
to the website or send us an email. We are always happy to help
54:46
you provide information about
54:49
anything related to.
54:50
Bird banding in birds.
54:52
Ann, I think this
54:56
is. I don't see more questions right now, but I think we're
54:59
e reaching the end of the presentation
55:03
and before we go, I want to thank you, John
55:07
or giving a great presentation about the history of the bird banding lab
55:11
b. And as we mentioned already a couple times we are going to have a series of
55:15
presentations that will bring you up to date with
55:19
what is the BBL today and what
55:22
will be the BBL of the next 100 years?
55:24
So
55:28
keep please check our website for the dates
55:32
of presentations and more detailed information about them.
55:35
And I think it's this I'm
55:38
m really happy to have you John. And I don't know if you wanna
55:42
close with something. I'll just say thank you for
55:46
the opportunity to be with you today and speak about this
55:49
program. I'm going to look forward to the next presentations because
55:52
I think it's going to be very exciting to see where
55:56
the bird banding laboratory is headed into its
55:59
2nd century, and I wish you good
56:02
luck to in everything you do. Thank you.
56:07
Thank you very much, John, and thank you
56:10
all for attending this
56:14
presentation and have a nice day.
56:15
Bye bye goodbye goodbye.
56:38

56:58

57:18