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Bird Banding Laboratory

The Bird Banding Laboratory is an integrated scientific program established in 1920 to support the collection, curation, archiving, and dissemination of information from banded and marked birds in North America. This information allows for developing effective bird science, management, and conservation.

News

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Staff Spotlight: Retirement of Bird Banding Lab Biologist Danny Bystrak

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USGS Bird Banding Laboratory curates more than 80 years of Pacific albatross banding and resighting records to build a complete dataset

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BBL’s Fall Migration Station Wrap-up for the 2021 Season

Publications

Decision-support framework for linking regional-scale management actions to continental-scale conservation of wide-ranging species

Anas acuta (Northern pintail; hereafter pintail) was selected as a model species on which to base a decision-support framework linking regional actions to continental-scale population and harvest objectives. This framework was then used to engage stakeholders, such as Landscape Conservation Cooperatives’ (LCCs’) habitat management partners within areas of importance to pintails, while maximizing c

Evaluation of a two-season banding program to estimate and model migratory bird survival

The management of North American waterfowl is predicated on long-term, continental scale banding implemented prior to the hunting season (i.e., July–September) and subsequent reporting of bands recovered by hunters. However, single-season banding and encounter operations have a number of characteristics that limit their application to estimating demographic rates and evaluating hypothesized limiti

Local fruit availability and en route wind conditions are poor predictors of bird abundance and composition during fall migration in coastal Yucatán Peninsula

In migratory stopover habitats, bird abundance and composition change on a near daily basis. On any given day, the local bird community should reflect local environmental conditions but also the environments that birds encountered previously along their migratory route. For example, during fall migration, the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico receives birds that have just crossed the Gulf o