Earth Observation User Case: Using Landsat to Connect Space to Village

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Detailed Description

Social scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center – in collaboration with the USGS National Land Imaging Program – conduct Earth observation user case studies using qualitative research methods. Using standard scientific methods, they are better able to understand the variety of Earth observation users, including how they use and value Earth observation data.

This graphic illustration guides you through an Earth observation user case study and provides the in-depth user experience of Africa Ixmucane Flores Anderson – one example of an Earth observation user. Africa is a remote sensing scientist at the University of Alabama Huntsville and a Research Scientist and the Amazonia lead at SERVIR, a joint venture between NASA and the U.S. Agency for International Development providing satellite-based Earth monitoring, imaging and mapping data, geospatial information, predictive models and science applications to help improve environmental decision-making among developing nations.

Africa was born in Guatemala and while growing up, witnessed the environmental degradation of the natural landscape in her hometown and country. Africa now uses Landsat to monitor harmful algal blooms and advocate for environmental conservation around the world. Landsat is a joint USGS/NASA Program that provides the longest continuous space-based record of Earth’s land surface. Every day, Landsat satellites provide essential information to help land managers and policy makers make decisions about resources and the environment.
 

Details

Date Taken:

Length: 00:03:29

Location Taken: Huntsville, AL, US

Transcript

Frame 1 (00:00 - 00:04)

USGS Science for a changing world

 

Frame 2 (00:04 - 00:08)

The views and opinions expressed in this video are those of the authors and do not necessarily state or reflect the official policy or position of any agency of the U.S. Government, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes.

 

Reference in this video to any specific commercial product, process, or service, or the use of any trade, firm or corporation name, or otherwise, is for the information and convenience of the public, and does not constitute endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government.

 

Frame 3 (00:09-00:39)

Social scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center - in collaboration with the USGS National Land Imaging Program - conduct earth observation user case studies using qualitative research methods.

 

Using these standard scientific methods (interviews, archival research, participant observation, social network analysis, focus groups, surveys, systems thinking), they are better able to understand the variety of earth observation users, including how they use and value earth observation data.

 

The following earth observation user case study provides the in-depth user experience of Africa Ixmucane Flores-Anderson - one example of an earth observation user.

 

Frame 4 (00:40 - 00:47)

Landsat is a USGS/NASA Satellite that records what’s happening on the Earth’s surface over time.

 

Africa Ixmucane Flores-Anderson: Using Landsat to Connect Space to Village

 

Frame 5 (00:47 - 00:58)

This is Africa Ixmucane Flores-Anderson.

Africa grew up in Guatemala near Lake Amatitlan. It was polluted by runoff and sewage from nearby communities.

 

Frame 6 (00:59 - 01:11)

Africa’s parents told stories about when the lake was pristine and they could enjoy its natural resources.

 

These stories inspired Africa to study the environment in school to make a difference!

 

Frame 7 (01:12 - 01:22)

Africa was bullied in university for being a dedicated and successful woman in her class, but her family encouraged her to stick with it!

 

Frame 8 (01:23 - 01:42)

Africa moved to Panama to work with the SERVIR program at CATHALAC, which provides satellite-based data to help environmental decision-making in developing countries.

She used Landsat to monitor forests close to where she grew up.

 

Frame 9 (01:42 - 01:58)

Africa moved to the United States and earned her Master’s degree.

 

As a leader in SERVIR, she continues to use Landsat for both global and regional projects.

 

Frame 10 (01:59 - 02:13)

Friends and colleagues helped support Africa when she moved to the USA.

She faced many challenges but showed determination when adjusting to a new culture, raising her daughter, and continuing to thrive at SERVIR.

 

Frame 11 (02:13 - 02:25)

Although Africa now works for NASA in Alabama, USA, Landsat’s free data and global coverage help her connect with her Amazonia collaborators. They continue to advance forest monitoring goals in South America.

 

Frame 12 (02:26 - 02:35)

Africa also works with communities in Central America. They use satellite imagery to monitor harmful algal blooms in lakes.

 

Frame 13 (02:36 - 02:54)

Africa didn’t stop with Landsat. She also helped write and publish a guide for using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) forest monitoring, and made it freely available!

 

These two data sources together revolutionize how we see our forests.

Frame 14 (02:55 - 03:09)

Africa continues her work to bring the benefits of earth observation data to villages throughout the world!

 

Frame 15 (03:10 - 03:24)

To learn more about Africa’s work and Landsat, go to:

 

Landsat.usgs.gov

and

Twitter.com/LadiesofLandsat

Twitter.com/Africa_Science
 

This video was brought to you by USGS (science for a changing world)

And was illustrated by Heartwood Visuals.

 

Frame 16 (03:24 - 03:29)

USGS Science for a changing world