Ecosystems

Filter Total Items: 455
Wolf close up of eyes
Date Published: November 16, 2017
Status: Active

In 1995 and 1996, wolves were reintroduced into the Northern Rockies where they have since established and spread. Within Yellowstone National Park, one of the core protected release sites, the unmanaged population steadily increased to high densities, producing a large wolf population susceptible to infections such as canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV) and sarcoptic mange...

Elk on a feedground in Wyoming.
Date Published: November 16, 2017
Status: Active

Over the past 20 years, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wyoming has been spreading slowly outward from the southeastern corner of the state toward the Greater Yellowstone Area and Wyoming's elk feed grounds, where more than 24,000 elk are supplementally fed each winter.

Bighorn sheep close up
Date Published: November 16, 2017
Status: Active

Bighorn sheep populations are often impacted by outbreaks of pneumonia that are suspected to come from domestic sheep and goats.

Cattle Grazing at Sunset in Montana
Date Published: November 16, 2017
Status: Active

Researchers at the USGS are working on developing new quantitative methods to study disease dynamics in wildlife systems as well as systems at the wildlife-domestic-human interface. Much of our work focuses on how host population structure affects disease invasion, persistence and control in wildlife disease systems. We tackle these issues with a combination of simulation and statistical...

Elk on a feedground in Wyoming.
Date Published: November 16, 2017
Status: Active

Brucellosis is a nationally and internationally regulated disease of livestock with significant consequences for animal health, public health, and international trade.

Black and white Tegu lizard in the Florida Everglades grass.
Date Published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Find out more about invasive species in the Everglades such as the burmese python and black and white tegus.

Head-on view of a male mouflon staring directly back at the camera
Date Published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Find out more about invasive species in the Pacific islands such as brown treesnake, invasive mammals (mouflon, feral pigs, rats, and mongoose), plants, ants, and yellowjacket wasps.

Invasive Tamarisk or saltcedar as it is known, growing on the side of a river.
Date Published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Find out more about invasive species in the western U.S. such as cheatgrass, tamarisk, and buffelgrass.

Brown treesnake
Date Published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

USGS research focuses on developing and enhancing capabilities to forecast and predict invasive species establishment and spread. Early detection helps resource managers identify and report new invasive species, especially for cryptic species and those in very low abundance, to better assess risks to natural areas. 

Image: Sea Lamprey Parasitic
Date Published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Tracking the establishment and spread of existing and new invasive species is critical to effectively manage invasive species.

Lake Trout with attached sea lamprey
Date Published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Find out more about invasive species in the midwest such as asian carp, sea lamprey, and phragmites.

Phragmites, an invasive grass
Date Published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

The USGS develops strategies and techniques to understand and facilitate restoration of native species and habitats affected by invasive species.  This is critical because control without restoration can leave the ecosystem vulnerable to subsequent reinvasion by the same or additional invasive species.