Airplane to Make Low-Level Flights Over Parts of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California and Nevada

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For about two months, starting around December 7, 2019, an airplane operated under contract to the USGS will be making low-level flights over parts of the eastern Mojave Desert.

Editor:  In the public interest and in accordance with Federal Aviation Administration regulations, the U.S. Geological Survey is announcing this low-level airborne project. Your assistance in informing local communities is appreciated.

For about two months, starting around December 7, 2019, an airplane operated under contract to the USGS will be making low-level flights over parts of the eastern Mojave Desert. The survey will extend from the west near Mountain Pass, California, to east of Nipton, Nevada; and it will extend as far north as the McCullough Range and as far south as Lanfair Valley. The survey will cover parts of the Clark Mountain Range, Ivanpah Mountain, New York Mountains, Ivanpah Valley, Interstate 15 and the cities of Primm and Nipton, Nevada.

Satellite imagery of the December 2019 low flying survey looking at geology, hydrology and natural resources of the region

Flight path of the CA/NV low flying survey. For about two months, starting around December 7, 2019, an airplane operated under contract to the USGS will be making low-level flights over parts of the eastern Mojave Desert. The survey will extend from the west near Mountain Pass, California, to east of Nipton, Nevada; and it will extend as far north as the McCullough Range and as far south as Lanfair Valley. The survey will cover parts of the Clark Mountain Range, Ivanpah Mountain, New York Mountains, Ivanpah Valley, Interstate 15 and the cities of Primm and Nipton, Nevada.

(Public domain.)

Residents and visitors should not be alarmed to witness a low-flying aircraft. The airplane is operated by experienced pilots who are specially trained for low-level flying. The airplane is operated by EDCON-PRJ, Inc. of Denver, Colorado, which is working with the FAA to ensure flights are in accordance with U.S. law.

This survey is designed to remotely study the eastern Mojave Desert as part of an ongoing USGS program to better understand the geology, hydrology and natural resources of the region. The aircraft will carry instruments that measure the earth’s naturally occurring magnetic field, and the new data will help geologists visualize and understand the rock layers below the surface.