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News Releases

Browse through a comprehensive list of all USGS national and state news items.

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Date published: October 24, 1997

Earthquake Shakes Up More Than Alabama

"This morning’s earthquake in southern Alabama was a wake-up call in more ways than one," said Dr. Mark Schaefer, Acting Director of the U.S. Geological Survey. "It serves to remind all of us that earthquakes are not restricted to California, Washington, and Alaska. The East is earthquake country, too."

Date published: October 22, 1997

Models Show Regional-Scale Impacts of Climate Change

How can climate change modify the appearance of society and the environment?

Date published: October 21, 1997

Ancient, Tiny Fossils Contribute to Retrofit of San Francisco-Oakland Bridge

The presence of 125,000-year-old microfossils in the muds of San Francisco Bay may help engineers decide where and how to rebuild the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, according to a U.S. Geological Survey(USGS)scientist in Menlo Park, Calif.

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Date published: October 21, 1997

USGS Launches New Electronic Clearinghouse For Biological Data

Dr. Dennis B. Fenn, Chief Biologist, today announced that the U.S. Geological Survey’s Biological Resources Divisionhas initiated a new Internet-based clearinghouse that can be used to search for and locate existing sources of biological data and information from a variety of sources.

Date published: October 20, 1997

Comet Struck Southern Nevada 370 Million Years Ago

An extraterrestrial object, theorized to be a comet at least one kilometer in diameter, impacted what is now southern Nevada about 370 million years ago.

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Date published: October 17, 1997

USGS Scientists to "Dish The Dirt" on Mars; Describe Ancient Impact Crater in Nevada; and Simulate The "Greenhouse Effect" at Salt Lake City Meeting

What the rover really saw on Mars, the effects of an asteroid impact in southern Nevada 370 million years ago, and how climate change will affect society and the environment are a sample of the earth-science topics that will be presented by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey during a national science meeting in Salt Lake City next week.

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Date published: October 16, 1997

The USGS presents: The Latest "Dirt" On Mars

What the Mars rover "said" when she spun her wheels; what Iceland has in common with the Red Planet; and what "bugs" in rocks can tell us about ancient Mars are the topics of three presentations by U.S. Geological Surveyscientists at next week’s annual meeting of the Geological Society of America. This year’s meeting will be held October 19-23, at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake Cit

Date published: October 16, 1997

USGS Cartographer’s Computer "Wizardry"... Asteroid Impact And Flying Dinosaurs Come To Salt Lake City

The asteroid impact that occurred 65 million years ago comes to life on the computer screen, Tuesday, Oct. 21, as a research cartographer with the U.S. Geological Survey demonstrates his latest HyperCard animation at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America (GSA) in Salt Lake City.

Date published: October 16, 1997

Salt Lake Geologist To Give Updates On Mars Pathfinder; Sojourner

When Henry J. Moore was growing up on Third Avenue during the 1930s, he says he didn’t pay much attention to the comic-book space dust being kickedup by Buck Rogers and Flash Gordon. Twenty years later, however, Moore’s interest in the dust and landforms of Planet Earth set him on a course that would eventually land in the dust on Mars; in a matter of speaking.

Date published: October 9, 1997

Disease Takes Its Toll on Waterfowl Populations

If U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service predictions hold, this year 92 million ducks will migrate south from their northern breeding grounds. Many factors will challenge the survival of these migrants, one of which is disease. According to Dr. Lynn Creekmore, hundreds of thousands of waterfowl are presently dying from avian botulism in flyway staging sites in southern Canada and the northern U.S.

Date published: October 8, 1997

Chesapeake Bay Sediment: Home to Pfiesteria-Like Microbes

Analysis of Chesapeake Bay sediment cores collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies (CEES) indicates that some of the sediment samples dating back hundreds or thousands of years contain Pfiesteria-like organisms and other microbes. 

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Date published: October 7, 1997

U.S. Geological Survey Consolidates Western Fishery Programs at Biological Research Center in Seattle, WA

The U.S. Geological Survey has reorganized its western fishery research programs and renamed its biological research facility at Seattle, Wash., to reflect the changes.