News

News Releases

Browse through a comprehensive list of all USGS national and state news items.

Filter Total Items: 4,557
Date published: March 27, 2017

Disappearing Beaches: Modeling Shoreline Change in Southern California

Using a newly-developed computer model called “CoSMoS-COAST” (Coastal Storm Modeling System – Coastal One-line Assimilated Simulation Tool) scientists predict that with limited human intervention, 31 to 67 percent of Southern California beaches may become completely eroded (up to existing coastal infrastructure or sea-cliffs) by the year 2100 under scenarios of sea-level rise of one to two meters.

Date published: March 27, 2017

Exhibit Fusing Art and Science Coming to Bismarck

Earth as Art, a U.S. Geological Survey traveling exhibit that merges art with dramatic Landsat imagery of the earth’s surface, is coming to Bismarck for the month of April. This display is free and open to the public.

Date published: March 27, 2017

Public Invitation: The State of Your State’s Vital Water Resources

Media and the public are invited to attend a free meeting about South Dakota water issues on Thursday, April 6, in Rapid City, South Dakota. 

Date published: March 27, 2017

Brown Bears, Sea Otters, and Seals, Oh My! —Unexpected interactions on the Katmai Coast

News reporters are invited to attend an illustrated public lecture to learn how U.S. Geological Survey scientists are conducting research on brown bears and other mammals on the coast of Katmai National Park. The presentation will highlight observations from video collars deployed on brown bears, and delve into some of the implications for wildlife population health and species adaptability.

Date published: March 23, 2017

Chandler Robbins Inspired Generations of Scientists and Birders, 1918-2017

U.S. Geological Survey scientist emeritus Chandler S. Robbins, whose heartfelt love of birds, quicksilver mind, boundless energy and sunny demeanor made him a major force in bird conservation in the U.S. and worldwide, died Monday, March 20 at the age of 98.

Date published: March 21, 2017

Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse: study identifies options to sustain ranching and help wildlife

Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications. The research was conducted by scientists from the United States Geological Survey, Colorado State University and Utah State University.

Date published: March 20, 2017

History of Abrupt Sinking of the Seal Beach Wetlands: New Study Reveals Past Quakes along Fault and Offers Glimpse into the Future

Seal Beach, Calif.— A new collaborative study shows evidence of prior abrupt sinking of the wetlands near Seal Beach, caused by ancient earthquakes that shook the area at least three times in the past 2,000 years, according to researchers.

Date published: March 20, 2017

Enormous Caribbean Waves Before 1492

Geologists have discovered evidence that unusual seas detached living corals from a Caribbean reef and scattered them far inland, as boulders, during the last centuries before Columbus arrived. The new findings will reinforce precautions against coastal hazards, Caribbean tsunami specialists said.

Date published: March 16, 2017

New Study Supports the Rarity and Limited Range of a Kauai Endemic Bird

Approximately 500 Puaiohi exist in the wild, all on Kauai

Date published: March 15, 2017

Wild Birds an Unlikely Source of Costly Poultry Disease

Wild ducks and shorebirds do not appear to carry Newcastle disease viruses that sicken or kill poultry, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: March 15, 2017

Study Evaluates Critical Mineral-Resource Potential in Alaska

Alaska has considerable potential for undiscovered mineral resources, including critical minerals.

Date published: March 15, 2017

Changing Temperatures and Precipitation May Affect Living Skin of Drylands

Arid and semiarid ecosystems are expected to experience significant changes in temperature and precipitation patterns, which may affect soil organisms in ways that cause surfaces to become lighter in color and thus reflect more sunlight, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study.