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Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - June 5, 2004

A different view

This is a photo of lava in west prong of Banana flow pouring off old Wilipe`a delta.
Looking southwest at lava in west prong of Banana flow pouring off old Wilipe`a delta. Sea cliff is 8-10 m high.
This is a photo of lava in Banana flow descending the mantled old cliff.
Clockwise pan from left image, showing surface of Wilipe`a delta back to old sea cliff predating the delta. Lava in Banana flow is descending the mantled old cliff. Light-colored surface is still hot lava flow.

 

This is a photo of the southwestern end of newly forming Banana delta.
Looking east across southwestern end of newly forming Banana delta (name still under discussion), soon after sunrise. Compare this image with last four images below for striking changes. This active delta is extremely unstable, as is any active lava delta.
This is a photo of surface of actively forming Banana delta.
Better view of surface of actively forming Banana delta, from top of Wilipe`a sea cliff.

 

This is a photo of lava in Banana flow plunging into ocean off southwest end of Banana delta.
Lava in Banana flow plunges into ocean off southwest end of Banana delta, newly forming delta seaward of old Wilipe`a delta. Maximum width of breakout, about 2 m.
This is a photo of lava breakouts pouring into the water.
More breakouts ready to pour into water.

 

This is a photo of streams of lava.
Unrealized by photographer, slab near top of image is tilting seaward (compare with left image two rows above for pre-tilting view). Photo was taken to show the streams of lava, including the vertical fall into the water.
This is a photo of an incandescent slab.
Suddenly, incandescent slab appears to rear up. However, close comparison with left image shows that top of slab moved seaward but did not change height much if at all. Apparently crusted lava on inland side of slab surged ahead, shoving slab outward, and finally drained way, presumably as lava under crust gushed into water. Slab is estimated 2-3 m high.

 

This is a photo of an incandescent slab developing a crust on part of its inland side.
Two minutes later, slab has developed a crust on part of its inland side, but incandescent interior remains visible.
This is a photo of an incandescent slab.
Closer view of the pinnacle. This structure is surely unstable but was still standing when photographer left scene 15 minutes later.