Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources

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Filter Total Items: 153
Date published: December 19, 2018
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Unalakleet

Two video cameras overlook the coast from atop a windmill tower in Unalakleet, Alaska where they look westward over Norton Sound.

Date published: December 14, 2018
Status: Completed

Preliminary simulation of the 2010 tsunami in Indonesia

Preliminary simulation of the tsunami from the October 25, 2010 M=7.7 subduction zone earthquake offshore of the Mentawai Islands, Indonesia

Contacts: Eric Geist
Date published: November 28, 2018
Status: Active

Hurricane Sandy Response- Linking the Delmarva Peninsula's Geologic Framework to Coastal Vulnerability

The Delmarva Peninsula is a 220-kilometer-long headland, spit, and barrier island complex that was significantly affected by Hurricane Sandy. In order to better constrain controls on coastal vulnerability and evolution, the region’s sediment sources, transport pathways and sediment sinks must be identified. This project defines the geologic framework of the Delmarva coastal system through...

Date published: November 13, 2018
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Isla Verde

Four video cameras overlook the coast at Isla Verde in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Two of them focus on the shoreline: Camera 1 looks at the nearby beach and eastward along the shore, and Camera 2 looks farther away to the eastern end of the beach. The other two look out across the reefs: Camera 3 to the north-northwest, and Camera 4 to the northeast.

Date published: November 8, 2018
Status: Active

Environmental Geochemistry- Coastal Aquifers, Wetlands, and Tidal Exchange

The interface between groundwater and the coastal or intertidal landscape determines the location and migration path of fresh and saline wetlands. These ecosystems interact with the coastal ocean in many ways, much of which is driven by tidal exchange and groundwater discharge, both common coastal processes that deliver water, nutrients, and other materials to nearshore ecosystems, including...

Date published: November 8, 2018
Status: Active

Environmental Geochemistry- Wetland Resilience

Tidal wetlands are key ecosystems because they are unique ecological systems that provide essential habitat for fish, shellfish, birds and other fauna and flora, many of which have great economic importance.  At the same time, tidal wetlands provide critical services to society by serving as a physical barrier between our cities, roads and homes and the rising sea. If healthy and properly...

Date published: November 8, 2018
Status: Active

Environmental Geochemistry- Managed Wetlands

The challenge of wetland persistence is complicated by widespread management and alteration of wetland hydrology, and built infrastructure within migration corridors. Human development and utilization of coastal landscapes in the U.S. during the past several centuries has resulted in loss of approximately half of tidal wetland area, largely due to 1) restriction of tidal flows, through...

Date published: November 8, 2018
Status: Active

Environmental Geochemistry

Coastal Environmental Geochemistry research at the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center spans multiple ecosystems and topics, including coastal wetlands, aquifers, and estuaries, with the goal of providing data and guidance to federal, state, local, and private land owners and managers on these vital ecosystems.

 

Date published: November 1, 2018
Status: Active

PCMSC Marine Facility (Marfac)

MarFac is the operational arm of the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center. The Marine Facility staff provides mechanical and electronics support for marine field operations.

Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

California Seafloor Mapping Program data collection

Here we describe the data collection methods and techniques of the California Seaflor Mapping Program: mapping, video and photography ground-truthing, and seismic profiling data collection.

Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

California Seafloor Mapping Program map-set production

USGS and the California Ocean Protection Council (COPC) are supporting development of peer-reviewed map sets for California’s mainland State Waters.

Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

California Seafloor Mapping Program mapping progress

Table showing mapping progress by block number, as of April 2018