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A multiproxy database of western North American Holocene paleoclimate records

September 30, 2020

Holocene climate reconstructions are useful for understanding the diverse features and spatial heterogeneity of past and future climate change. Here we present a database of western North American Holocene paleoclimate records. The database gathers paleoclimate time series from 209 terrestrial and marine sites, including 382 individual proxy records. The records span at least 4000 of the last 12 000 years (median duration = 10 603 years), and have been screened for resolution, chronologic control, and climate sensitivity. Records were included that reflect temperature, hydroclimate, or circulation features. The database is shared in the machine readable Linked Paleo Data (LiPD) format and includes geochronologic data for generating site-level time-uncertain ensembles. This publicly accessible and curated collection of proxy paleoclimate records will have wide research applications, including, for example, investigations of the primary features of ocean-atmospheric circulation along the eastern margin of the North Pacific and the latitudinal response of climate to orbital changes. 

Citation Information

Publication Year 2020
Title A multiproxy database of western North American Holocene paleoclimate records
DOI 10.5194/essd-2020-215
Authors Cody C. Routson, Darrell S. Kaufman, Nicholas P. McKay, Michael Erb, S. H. Arcusa, Kendrick Brown, Matthew E. Kirby, Jeremiah Marsicek, R. Scott Anderson, Gonzalo Jimenez-Moreno, Jessica R. Rodysill, M. S. Lachniet, Sherilyn C. Fritz, Joseph Bennett, Michelle F. Goman, Sarah E. Metcalfe, J. M. Galloway, G. Schoups, David Wahl, Jesse L. Morris, F. Staines-Urias, A. Dawson, B. N. Shuman, Daniel G. Gavin
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Earth System Science Data
Index ID 70218827
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Geology, Minerals, Energy, and Geophysics Science Center