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Accidental chlorophacinone exposure of lactating ewes: Clinical follow-up and human health dietary implications

July 6, 2020

Anticoagulant rodenticides are widely used for rodent control in agricultural and urban settings. Their intense use can sometimes result in accidental exposure and even poisoning of livestock. Can milk, eggs or meat derived from such accidentally exposed animals be consumed by humans? Data on the pharmacokinetics of chlorophacinone in milk of accidentally exposed ewes were used to estimate the risk associated with its consumption. Three days after accidental ingestion, chlorophacinone was detected in plasma of 18 ewes, with concentrations exceeding 100 ng/mL in 11 animals. Chlorophacinone was detected in milk on day 2 post-exposure and remained quantifiable for at least 7 days in milk of these 11 ewes. Concentrations in milk were much lower than in plasma and decreased quickly (mean half-life of 2 days). This study demonstrated dose-dependent mammary transfer of ingested chlorophacinone. Variation in prothrombin time (PT) on Day 3 suggested that some of the ewes that ingested chlorophacinone may have been adversely affected, but PT did not facilitate estimation of the quantity of chlorophacinone consumed. Using safety factors described in the literature, consumption of dairy products derived from these ewes after a one-week withdrawal period would pose low risk to consumers.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2020
Title Accidental chlorophacinone exposure of lactating ewes: Clinical follow-up and human health dietary implications
DOI 10.1016/j.fct.2020.111518
Authors Meg-Anne Moriceau, Sébastien Lefebvre, Isabelle Fourel, Etienne Benoit, Barnett A. Rattner, Virginie Lattard
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Food and Chemical Toxicology
Series Number
Index ID 70210956
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Patuxent Wildlife Research Center