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Eastern Ecological Science Center

At the USGS Eastern Ecological Science Center (EESC), our vision is to be recognized as a world leader in fish, wildlife and associated ecosystem science through scientific excellence and responsiveness to society’s needs.

News

Notes from the Field: American Woodcock Migration

Notes from the Field: American Woodcock Migration

Surviving Migration Through an Urban Landscape! One Songbird’s Journey

Surviving Migration Through an Urban Landscape! One Songbird’s Journey

Celebrating Women's History Month: Women in Bird Banding

Celebrating Women's History Month: Women in Bird Banding

Publications

Effects of episodic stream dewatering on brook trout spatial population structure

Stream dewatering is expected to become more prevalent due to climate change, and we explored the potential consequences for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) within a temperate forest ecosystem in eastern North America.We estimated fish density within stream pools (n = 386) from electrofishing surveys over 10 years (2012–2021) to compare a stream that exhibits episodic dewatering (Paine Run) ag
Authors
Nathaniel P. Hitt, Karli M Rogers, Karmann G. Kessler, Martin Briggs, Jennifer Burlingame Hoyle Fair, Andrew C. Dolloff

Translocation in a fragmented river provides demographic benefits for imperiled fishes

Fragmentation isolates individuals and restricts access to valuable habitat with severe consequences for populations, such as reduced gene flow, disruption of recolonization dynamics, reduced resiliency to disturbance, and changes in aquatic community structure. Translocations to mitigate the effects of fragmentation and habitat loss are common, but few are rigorously evaluated, particularly for f
Authors
Casey A. Pennock, Brian Daniel Healy, Matthew R. Bogaard, Mark C. McKinstry, Keith B. Gido, C. Nathan Cathcart, Brian Hines

How low is too low? Partnering with stakeholders and managers to define ecologically based low-flow thresholds in a perennial temperate river

Managing aquatic ecosystems for people and nature can be improved by collaboration among scientists, managers, decision-makers, and other stakeholders. Many collaborative and interdisciplinary approaches have been developed to address the management of freshwater ecosystems; however, there are still barriers to overcome. We worked as part of a regional stakeholder group comprising municipal water
Authors
Laura Rack, Mary Freeman, Ben N. Emanuel, Laura S. Craig, Stephen W. Golladay, Carol Yang, Seth J. Wenger

Science

Understanding wild waterfowl use of retention ponds at commercial poultry farms – a potential route for avian influenza virus transmission

Retention ponds on commercial poultry farms are used by wild waterfowl, representing a potential pathway for the transmission of avian influenza viruses between waterfowl and farmed poultry. Managing vegetation conditions surrounding ponds may be one way to reduce their use by waterfowl.
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Understanding wild waterfowl use of retention ponds at commercial poultry farms – a potential route for avian influenza virus transmission

Retention ponds on commercial poultry farms are used by wild waterfowl, representing a potential pathway for the transmission of avian influenza viruses between waterfowl and farmed poultry. Managing vegetation conditions surrounding ponds may be one way to reduce their use by waterfowl.
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Terrestrial Ecotoxicology and Disease Research Facility Core Technology Team

About the Research The Terrestrial Ecotoxicology and Disease Research Facility Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program provides an integrated mechanism for conducting controlled exposure studies on wildlife at varied spatiotemporal scales.
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Terrestrial Ecotoxicology and Disease Research Facility Core Technology Team

About the Research The Terrestrial Ecotoxicology and Disease Research Facility Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program provides an integrated mechanism for conducting controlled exposure studies on wildlife at varied spatiotemporal scales.
Learn More

Functional and Molecular Bioassay Core Technology Team

About the Research The Functional and Molecular Bioassay Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program utilizes reporter assays, quantitative gene expression analyses, and high-throughput sequencing methods to produce functional endpoints across a broad scope of environmental topics and sample matrices.
link

Functional and Molecular Bioassay Core Technology Team

About the Research The Functional and Molecular Bioassay Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program utilizes reporter assays, quantitative gene expression analyses, and high-throughput sequencing methods to produce functional endpoints across a broad scope of environmental topics and sample matrices.
Learn More