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Case histories of bald eagles and other raptors killed by organophosphorus insecticides topically applied to livestock

June 16, 2010

Since 1982 when secondary poisoning of a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) was documented following the recommended use of famphur applied topically to cattle, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center has tested dead birds of prey for poisoning by famphur and other pour-on organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. Brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was first determined, then if ChE was depressed greater than or equal to 50%, stomach and/or crop contents were evaluated for anti-ChE compounds. This report presents the circumstances surrounding the OP-caused deaths of eight bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), two red-tailed hawks, and one great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) between March 1984 and March 1985. OP poisoning of raptors by pour-on insecticides in the United States is widespread, but its magnitude is unknown.

Citation Information

Publication Year 1987
Title Case histories of bald eagles and other raptors killed by organophosphorus insecticides topically applied to livestock
DOI
Authors C. J. Henny, E. J. Kolbe, E. F. Hill, L. J. Blus
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Journal of Wildlife Diseases
Series Number
Index ID 5221526
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Patuxent Wildlife Research Center