Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Food habits of introduced rodents in high-elevation shrubland of Haleakala National Park, Maui, Hawai'i

July 21, 2000

Mus musculus and Rattus rattus are ubiquitous consumers in the high-elevation shrubland of Haleakala National Park. Food habits of these two rodent species were determined from stomach samples obtained by snaptrapping along transects located at four different elevations during November 1984 and February, May, and August 1985. Mus musculus fed primarily on fruits, grass seeds, and arthropods. Rattus rattus ate various fruits, dicot leaves, and arthropods. Arthropods, many of which are endemic, were taken frequently by Mus musculus throughout the year at the highest elevation where plant food resources were scarce. Araneida, Lepidoptera (primarily larvae), Coleoptera, and Homoptera were the main arthropod taxa taken. These rodents, particularly Mus musculus, exert strong predation pressure on populations of arthropod species, including locally endemic species on upper Haleakala Volcano.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2000
Title Food habits of introduced rodents in high-elevation shrubland of Haleakala National Park, Maui, Hawai'i
DOI
Authors F. Russell Cole, Lloyd L. Loope, Arthur C. Medeiros, Cameron E. Howe, Laurel J. Anderson
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Pacific Science
Series Number
Index ID 70178168
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center

Related Content