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Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center

Research at the Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center focuses on providing the scientific understanding and technologies needed to support and implement sound management and conservation of our Nation's biological resources occurring in Hawai'i and other Pacific island locations.

News

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A Climate Change Canary in the Coal Mine - The Endangered Hawaiian Honeycreepers

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New Report: Conservation Strategies for Hawaiian Forest Birds at Risk of Extinction - Biological and Biocultural Considerations

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Community Meeting for Reimagining Molokaʻi's Wetlands

Publications

Size distribution and reproductive phenology of the invasive Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) in the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, Florida, USA

The design of successful invasive species control programs is often hindered by the absence of basic demographic data on the targeted population. Establishment of invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) in the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, Florida USA has led to local precipitous declines (> 90%) of mesomammal populations and is also a major threat to native populations of reptiles an

A century of drought in Hawai‘i: Geospatial analysis and synthesis across hydrological, ecological, and socioeconomic scales

Drought is a prominent feature of Hawaiʻi’s climate. However, it has been over 30 years since the last comprehensive meteorological drought analysis, and recent drying trends have emphasized the need to better understand drought dynamics and multi-sector effects in Hawaiʻi. Here, we provide a comprehensive synthesis of past drought effects in Hawaiʻi that we integrate with geospatial analysis of d

Status of landbirds in the National Park of American Samoa

The National Park of American Samoa (NPSA) was surveyed in 2011 and 2018 using point-transect distance sampling to estimate trends in landbird distribution, composition, population density, and abundance. Surveys were conducted within the Ta‘ū Unit and Tutuila Unit, each on separate islands of American Samoa. We detected a total of 14 species during surveys and there were sufficient detections of

Science

Identifying Genetic Diversity of Wolbachia Bacteria for Mosquito Control

We are sequencing the DNA of Wolbachia bacteria found in mosquito populations in Hawai’i and those used for mosquito control. We are also developing sample processing techniques to increase the efficiency and accuracy of monitoring mosquito control efforts to help long-term survival and restoration of Hawaiian forest bird populations.
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Identifying Genetic Diversity of Wolbachia Bacteria for Mosquito Control

We are sequencing the DNA of Wolbachia bacteria found in mosquito populations in Hawai’i and those used for mosquito control. We are also developing sample processing techniques to increase the efficiency and accuracy of monitoring mosquito control efforts to help long-term survival and restoration of Hawaiian forest bird populations.
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Mariana Swiftlet Population Analysis

Population counts of Mariana swiftlets is critical to understand if control of brown tree snakes in Guam have aided swiftlet recovery. USGS scientists and The University of Hawai’i at Hilo are testing videographic methods to count Mariana swiftlet population size and observe their nesting and roosting behavior.
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Mariana Swiftlet Population Analysis

Population counts of Mariana swiftlets is critical to understand if control of brown tree snakes in Guam have aided swiftlet recovery. USGS scientists and The University of Hawai’i at Hilo are testing videographic methods to count Mariana swiftlet population size and observe their nesting and roosting behavior.
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Chemical Ecology of Rapid ʽŌhiʽa Death

We are working on understanding the chemical ecology of Rapid ʽŌhiʽa Death - ROD -, which is critical for protecting both healthy and ROD-infected ʽōhi‘a. A better understanding could lead to early ROD detection tools and the development of attractants and repellents to manipulate ambrosia beetle populations.
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Chemical Ecology of Rapid ʽŌhiʽa Death

We are working on understanding the chemical ecology of Rapid ʽŌhiʽa Death - ROD -, which is critical for protecting both healthy and ROD-infected ʽōhi‘a. A better understanding could lead to early ROD detection tools and the development of attractants and repellents to manipulate ambrosia beetle populations.
Learn More