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Isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage as measure of bacterial oxidation

January 1, 1984

The formation of acid waters by oxidation of pyrite-bearing ore deposits, mine tailing piles, and coal measures is a complex biogeochemical process and is a serious environmental problem. We have studied the oxygen and sulphur isotope geochemistry of sulphides, sulphur, sulphate and water in the field and in experiments to identify sources of oxygen and reaction mechanisms of sulphate formation. Here we report that the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage shows a large variation due to differing proportions of atmospheric- and water-derived oxygen from both chemical and bacterially-mediated oxidation. 18O-enrichment of sulphate results from pyrite oxidation facilitated by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in aerated environments. Oxygen isotope analysis may therefore be useful in monitoring the effectiveness of abatement programmes designed to inhibit bacterial oxidation. Sulphur isotopes show no significant fractionation between pyrite and sulphate, indicating the quantitative insignificance of intermediate oxidation states of sulphur under acid conditions. 

Citation Information

Publication Year 1984
Title Isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage as measure of bacterial oxidation
DOI 10.1038/308538a0
Authors B.E. Taylor, M.C. Wheeler, D. Kirk Nordstrom
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Nature
Series Number
Index ID 70013741
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Toxic Substances Hydrology Program

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