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Multi-species call-broadcast improved detection of endangered Yuma clapper rail compared to single-species call-broadcast

June 11, 2013

Broadcasting calls of marsh birds during point-count surveys increases their detection probability and decreases variation in the number of birds detected across replicate surveys. However, multi-species monitoring using call-broadcast may reduce these benefits if birds are reluctant to call once they hear broadcasted calls of other species. We compared a protocol that uses call-broadcast for only one species (Yuma clapper rail [Rallus longirostris yumanensis]) to a protocol that uses call-broadcast for multiple species. We detected more of each of the following species using the multi-species protocol: 25 % more pied-billed grebes, 160 % more American bitterns, 52 % more least bitterns, 388 % more California black rails, 12 % more Yuma clapper rails, 156 % more Virginia rails, 214 % more soras, and 19 % more common gallinules. Moreover, the coefficient of variation was smaller when using the multi-species protocol: 10 % smaller for pied-billed grebes, 38 % smaller for American bitterns, 19 % smaller for least bitterns, 55 % smaller for California black rails, 5 % smaller for Yuma clapper rails, 38 % smaller for Virginia rails, 44 % smaller for soras, and 8 % smaller for common gallinules. Our results suggest that multi-species monitoring approaches may be more effective and more efficient than single-species approaches even when using call-broadcast.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2013
Title Multi-species call-broadcast improved detection of endangered Yuma clapper rail compared to single-species call-broadcast
DOI 10.1007/s13157-013-0425-x
Authors Christopher P. Nadeau, Courtney J. Conway, Linden Piest, William P. Burger
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Wetlands
Series Number
Index ID 70040149
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Arizona Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

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