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Rapidly spreading seagrass invades the Caribbean with unknown ecological consequences

January 1, 2015

The non-native seagrass Halophila stipulacea has spread rapidly throughout the Caribbean Sea (Willette et al. 2014); without additional research, the ecological ramifications of this invasion are difficult to predict. Biodiversity, connectivity of marine ecosystems, and recovery of degraded coral reefs could all be affected. The invasive seagrass, native to the Red Sea and Indian Ocean, has taken over sand bottoms and intermixed with or replaced native seagrasses, including Thalassia testudinum, Syringodium filiforme, and Halodule wrightii.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2014
Title Rapidly spreading seagrass invades the Caribbean with unknown ecological consequences
DOI 10.1890/14.WB.016
Authors Caroline S. Rogers, Demian A Willette, Jeff Miller
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Series Number
Index ID 70159456
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center