Geology and Ecology of National Parks

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park Standard Photo Tour

 

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

Pu`uhonua o Honaunau is commonly known as The Place of Refuge, but it is much than that. It was a historic village, fishing and farming area. This thatched building is a reconstruction of part of Hale o Keawe temple (National Park Service, 2001).

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

This restored wall is on the shore of Honaunau Bay by The Place of Refuge (Pu'uhonua o Honaunau).

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

Restored historic wall along Hoanaunau Bay.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

Tree molds like this one are fairly common in the ancient lava flows in and around Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

A thatched roof hut built in traditional Hawaian style. This is part of a village exhibit at Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

A palm grove in the historic village area at Pu'uhonoa o Honaunau.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

Traditional Hawaiian tiki wood carvings on display next to Honaunau Bay.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

Traditional Hawaiian tiki wood carvings next to a thatched-roof temple building at Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

Hawaiian tiki wood carvings on display next to Honaunau Bay. The western flank of Mauna Loa is visible in the distance.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park

Restored historic wall and basalt flows exposed along the beach at Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park

A tide pool in basalt flows at Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park

Basalt flows, back-beach sand, and palms at Pu'uhonua o Honaunau.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park

Coast side picnic area with a large cypress tree at Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park

Freshwater fish pond and palms at the Pu-uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park

This wild burrow lives in a small park on the shore of Kealakekua Bay, just north of Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park. The Captain Cook Memorial is on the coastal headlands on opposite side of the bay. It was the location that Captain Cook and four other English sailers were killed in a skirmish near the point on the bay on February 14, 1779 (Rhodes and Greene, 2001).

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park

The massive cliffs around Kealakekua Bay are part of an escarpment created by a massive landslide that slid off the flank of the Big Island into the deep sea. The landslide may have created a tsunami (U. S. Geological Survey, 2008).

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)