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Alaska

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Repeat oblique photographs of Gulkana glaciers in Alaska.
December 31, 1967

Repeat oblique photographs of Gulkana glaciers in Alaska.

Repeat oblique photographs of Gulkana glaciers in Alaska.  1967, Unknown USGS photographer. 2016, L. Sass, USGS.

Repeat oblique photographs of Wolverine glacier in Alaska.
December 31, 1966

Repeat oblique photographs of Wolverine glacier in Alaska.

Repeat oblique photographs of Wolverine glacier in Alaska.  1966 image by unknown USGS photographer; 2015 image by L. Sass, USGS.

Photograph shows what remains of a building foundation in the foreground and a house in the background and up a slight elevation
December 31, 1964

Chenega Village after tsunami waves hit in 1964

Photograph taken in 1964 of the main part of the Chenega village site in Alaska. Pilings in the ground mark the former locations of homes swept away by tsunami waves. The schoolhouse on high ground was undamaged. Credit: Figure 6 from Plafker et al. (1969).

The Seward Highway at the head of Turnagain Arm near Anchorage after the M9.2 March 27, 1964 earthquake.
March 27, 1964

Snow plow theory

The Seward Highway at the head of Turnagain Arm near Anchorage after the quake.

Image: Muir and Riggs Glaciers, Muir Inlet, Alaska - 1950
August 4, 1950

Muir and Riggs Glaciers, Muir Inlet, Alaska - 1950

This, the first of two repeat photographs, documents significant changes that have occurred during the nine years between photographs A and B. Although Muir Glacier has retreated more than 3 kilometers and thinned more than 100 meters, exposing Muir Inlet, it remains connected with tributary Riggs Glacier. White Thunder Ridge remains devoid of vegetation. In places,

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Attribution: Region 11: Alaska
Image: Muir and Riggs Glaciers, Muir Inlet, Alaska - 1941
August 13, 1941

Muir and Riggs Glaciers, Muir Inlet, Alaska - 1941

This northeast-looking photograph, on the southeastern side of White Thunder Ridge ,shows the lower reaches of Muir Glacier, then a large tidewater calving valley glacier, and its tributary Riggs Glacier. The séracs in the lower right-hand corner of the photograph mark Muir Glacier’s terminus. The ice thickness is more than 700 meters. Muir Glacier had been retreating

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Attribution: Region 11: Alaska
Image: Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska
August 13, 1912

Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska

Volcanic ash drifts around houses at Katmai after the June 1912 eruption of Novarupta Volcano. Church in the distant background. August 13, 1912.

Attribution: Region 11: Alaska
Image: Exit Glacier, Alaska (In Full Retreat)

Exit Glacier, Alaska (In Full Retreat)

USGS ecologist Kevin Lafferty visits the Exit Glacier in Alaska.

Attribution: Region 11: Alaska
USGS
October 10, 2018

Internship: Resolving spatial and temporal variability of snow...

Resolving spatial and temporal variability of snow accumulation in mountain and glacier environments

Summary: The complex nature of snow limits our quantitative understanding of its distribution on the landscape. This internship will focus on a unique data set of snow radar profiles collected at multiple glaciers in Alaska over several years. The data has potential

Image: The Ivotuk Hills, Alaska North Slope, Viewed From Ivotuk Camp

The Ivotuk Hills, Alaska North Slope, Viewed From Ivotuk Camp

Exposures of sedimentary rocks in the western Brooks Range, Alaska were evaluated for their contents of metals and phosphate and for their petroleum maturation histories to determine the potential for undiscovered resources in the southern National Petroleum Reserve Alaska.

Attribution: Region 11: Alaska