Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,111
Two women wearing personal protective gear on a boat stand near a mud sampling device and scoop mud from it.
January 24, 2012

Sampling mud with a Smith-Mac

PCMSC scientists Amy Foxgrover (left) and Leticia Hallas collect mud from a Smith-McIntyre grab sampler aboard R/V Parke Snavely to study sediment sources and redistribution within San Francisco Bay.

Toe of the active Cleveland Corral landslide in 2011
December 31, 2011

Cleveland Corral landslide in 2011

Toe of the active Cleveland Corral landslide in 2011, perched above US Highway 50 in distance.  Movement typically only occurs during wet winter and spring months.

Map of facilities along the Colorado River and Yuma Agricultural Area.
December 31, 2011

Map of facilities along the Colorado River and Yuma Agricultural Area.

Location map showing the location of facilities along the Colorado River and Yuma agricultural area adjacent to the United States-Mexico Border (USBR, 2011).

Computer-generated illustration of high-resolution seafloor maps created with data collected.
December 31, 2011

San Diego Trough fault

Bird's-eye view map of a section of the seafloor off southern California, made with depth data. The map shows a channel wall that has been cut by the San Diego Trough fault and moved about 20 meters. This feature is about 1,000 meters below sea level.

All-American Canal winding through the Imperial Sand Dunes
December 31, 2011

All-American Canal

The All-American Canal (AAC) in southern Imperial County, California, has historically been unlined, resulting in substantial losses to seepage. In 2006, the Imperial Irrigation District, under a contract with the United States Bureau of Reclamation, initiated a project to build a concrete-lined canal parallel to 23 miles of the earthen AAC. Construction was completed in

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December 8, 2011

PubTalk 12/2011 — Tracking Ongoing Kilauea Eruptions

--fissures...fountains...and flows

by Matthew Patrick, USGS, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

 

  • Spectacular Kilauea eruptions have produced a summit lava lake, roiling for several years, and a flank eruption recently sending lava flows downslope to threaten residential areas
  • How do USGS scientists monitor and track
November 17, 2011

PubTalk 11/2011 — Colorado River High-Flow Experiments

- a story of Grand Canyon geology, water, and biology

by Jack Schmidt & David Rubin

 

  • New insights from recent Glen Canyon Dam high-flow experiments on the Colorado River
  • Are these high flows doing more than building large sand bars in Grand Canyon National Park?
  • The challenge of adaptively managing
November 3, 2011

PubTalk 11/2011 — USGS Science for a Changing Bay Area

-- a special USGS public lecture celebrating the inaugural Bay Area Science Festival

by Patrick Barnard and William Ellsworth

 

  • USGS scientists will be speaking about current Bay Area research, including recent discoveries beneath Bay waters and the latest on earthquake research. The scientists will be presenting
A steel-hulled boat motors slowly through a waterway surrounded by marsh grasses.
October 27, 2011

R/V Parke Snavely in Alviso Slough

USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center's research vessel R/V Parke Sanvely motors through Alviso Slough in the southern end of San Francisco Bay. Scientists were collecting depth data to make a detailed bathymetric map of the Bay.

October 27, 2011

PubTalk 10/2011 — Migratory Connectivity in a Changing Climate

by Susan Haig, Wildlife Ecologist

 

  • Scientists are studying global migratory animal movements throughout their annual cycles to improve conservation efforts
  • Changing climate conditions have accentuated this need, as species movements and their ranges are fluctuating every year
  • Technology being used to study the
September 22, 2011

PubTalk 9/2011 — Tracking the Nation's Groundwater Reserves

--issues facing current and future water supplies

by William Alley, USGS Office of Groundwater

 

  • Ground water is among the Nation's most important natural resources, providing half of our drinking water as well as being essential to agriculture and industry, and the health of ecosystems throughout the country
Small charred cones on the branches of a dead cypress
September 7, 2011

Open and charred Tecate cypress cones

Tecate cypress regeneration, showing charred, open cones on the branches of a dead cypress (top right of photo). Tecate cypress cones are serotinous, meaning they open in response to fire. 

Filter Total Items: 980
USGS science for a changing world logo
December 30, 2004

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has posted new maps on the Internet showing basins with the greatest potential for producing mudslides as a result of the devastating October fires in Southern California. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 30, 2004

Due to recent heavy rainfall in southern California and the triggering of several debris flows in the mountain ranges west of Los Angeles, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is issuing a landslide advisory for southern California.

USGS
December 30, 2004

Due to recent heavy rainfall in southern California and the triggering of several debris flows in the mountain ranges west of Los Angeles, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is issuing a landslide advisory for southern California.

USGS
December 13, 2004

Urban Development and Water Quality: USGS is studying urban basins in the Piedmont of North Carolina to determine the relation between urban development and water quality.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 25, 2004

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) presented the 2004 John Wesley Powell Award to governmental, educational and organizational partners who have worked with the USGS to strengthen The National Map, to teach the importance of remote sensing data, to communicate USGS science, and to provide information to water managers about floods.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 30, 2004

Calling it "one of the most significant earthquakes in the history of seismology," William Ellsworth, chief scientist for the USGS Earthquake Hazards program in California, today commended efforts to densely instrument the location of the September 28th Parkfield 2004 Earthquake.

USGS
September 30, 2004

Calling it "one of the most significant earthquakes in the history of seismology," William Ellsworth, chief scientist for the USGS Earthquake Hazards program in California, today commended efforts to densely instrument the location of the September 28th Parkfield 2004 Earthquake.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 1, 2004

Sea otters delight children and adults alike with their endearing faces and behavior, and even scientists find them fascinating creatures. California’s threatened sea otters are the focus of collaborative ongoing studies by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and colleagues. Their story is the subject of a new USGS video that can be viewed on demand online.

USGS
September 1, 2004

Sea otters delight children and adults alike with their endearing faces and behavior, and even scientists find them fascinating creatures. California’s threatened sea otters are the focus of collaborative ongoing studies by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and colleagues.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 30, 2004

Today, June 30, 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announces the recipients of the first year of the Mineral Resources External Research Program, a grant and/or cooperative agreement opportunity designed to support minerals research. The grant award is split among six topics that will enhance ongoing research in the USGS and deliver products within one year.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 16, 2004

Observers tallied a record-high total of 2,825 California sea otters for the 2004 spring survey, led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The 2004 total marked the 2nd consecutive year the threatened population has shown an appreciable increase in numbers, up 12.8 percent over the 2003 total of 2,505 otters.

USGS
June 16, 2004

Observers tallied a record-high total of 2,825 California sea otters for the 2004 spring survey, led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The 2004 total marked the 2nd consecutive year the threatened population has shown an appreciable increase in numbers, up 12.8 percent over the 2003 total of 2,505 otters.