Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,121
December 8, 2011

PubTalk 12/2011 — Tracking Ongoing Kilauea Eruptions

--fissures...fountains...and flows

by Matthew Patrick, USGS, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

 

  • Spectacular Kilauea eruptions have produced a summit lava lake, roiling for several years, and a flank eruption recently sending lava flows downslope to threaten residential areas
  • How do USGS scientists monitor and track
November 17, 2011

PubTalk 11/2011 — Colorado River High-Flow Experiments

- a story of Grand Canyon geology, water, and biology

by Jack Schmidt & David Rubin

 

  • New insights from recent Glen Canyon Dam high-flow experiments on the Colorado River
  • Are these high flows doing more than building large sand bars in Grand Canyon National Park?
  • The challenge of adaptively managing
November 3, 2011

PubTalk 11/2011 — USGS Science for a Changing Bay Area

-- a special USGS public lecture celebrating the inaugural Bay Area Science Festival

by Patrick Barnard and William Ellsworth

 

  • USGS scientists will be speaking about current Bay Area research, including recent discoveries beneath Bay waters and the latest on earthquake research. The scientists will be presenting
A steel-hulled boat motors slowly through a waterway surrounded by marsh grasses.
October 27, 2011

R/V Parke Snavely in Alviso Slough

USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center's research vessel R/V Parke Sanvely motors through Alviso Slough in the southern end of San Francisco Bay. Scientists were collecting depth data to make a detailed bathymetric map of the Bay.

October 27, 2011

PubTalk 10/2011 — Migratory Connectivity in a Changing Climate

by Susan Haig, Wildlife Ecologist

 

  • Scientists are studying global migratory animal movements throughout their annual cycles to improve conservation efforts
  • Changing climate conditions have accentuated this need, as species movements and their ranges are fluctuating every year
  • Technology being used to study the
September 22, 2011

PubTalk 9/2011 — Tracking the Nation's Groundwater Reserves

--issues facing current and future water supplies

by William Alley, USGS Office of Groundwater

 

  • Ground water is among the Nation's most important natural resources, providing half of our drinking water as well as being essential to agriculture and industry, and the health of ecosystems throughout the country
Small charred cones on the branches of a dead cypress
September 7, 2011

Open and charred Tecate cypress cones

Tecate cypress regeneration, showing charred, open cones on the branches of a dead cypress (top right of photo). Tecate cypress cones are serotinous, meaning they open in response to fire. 

Three people wearing safety gear standing on a ship deck hold a metal frame strapped to rigging.
September 1, 2011

Camera sled deployment off research vessel

U.S. Geological Survey geographer Nadine Golden (center, kneeling) works with USGS marine operations staffer Cordell Johnson (right) and a deckhand (left) to deploy a camera sled from the research vessel Coral Sea. The sled is towed close to the seafloor and collects real-time photographs and videos. Observers on board the vessel can watch the live video feed and

...
August 25, 2011

PubTalk 8/2011 — Through the Lens of Time

Repeat Photography in an Era of Global Change

by Robert Webb, Hydrologist

  • Repeat photography remains an essential and cost-effective technique for scientists and researchers working to track and study changing environmental conditions
  • Scientists worldwide are exploring methods to apply this technique in various
July 28, 2011

PubTalk 7/2011 — How is San Francisco Bay Doing?

discoveries from 4 decades of studies

by Jim Cloern, Senior Research Biologist

 

  • San Francisco Bay is in a continual state of change.
  • Drivers of change include:
    • residiual effects of the Gold Mining era
    • the 1972 Clean Water Act
    • urbanization of the landscape
    • transoceanic shipping
June 30, 2011

PubTalk 6/2011 — Exploring California's Amazing Seafloor

--the visionary California Seafloor Mapping Program

by Sam Johnson, USGS Pacific Coastal & Marine Science Center 

 

May 26, 2011

PubTalk 5/2011 — The Future of Rare Earth Elements

--Will these high-tech industry elements continue in short supply?

by Keith Long, USGS Mineral Resource Analyst

 

  • Rare earth elements provide critical material for flat-panel display screens, cell phones, electric cars, windmills, etc.
  • Although relatively abundant in nature, deposits of rare earth elements that
Filter Total Items: 973
USGS science for a changing world logo
September 1, 2004

Sea otters delight children and adults alike with their endearing faces and behavior, and even scientists find them fascinating creatures. California’s threatened sea otters are the focus of collaborative ongoing studies by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and colleagues. Their story is the subject of a new USGS video that can be viewed on demand online.

USGS
September 1, 2004

Sea otters delight children and adults alike with their endearing faces and behavior, and even scientists find them fascinating creatures. California’s threatened sea otters are the focus of collaborative ongoing studies by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and colleagues.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 30, 2004

Today, June 30, 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announces the recipients of the first year of the Mineral Resources External Research Program, a grant and/or cooperative agreement opportunity designed to support minerals research. The grant award is split among six topics that will enhance ongoing research in the USGS and deliver products within one year.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 16, 2004

Observers tallied a record-high total of 2,825 California sea otters for the 2004 spring survey, led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The 2004 total marked the 2nd consecutive year the threatened population has shown an appreciable increase in numbers, up 12.8 percent over the 2003 total of 2,505 otters.

USGS
June 16, 2004

Observers tallied a record-high total of 2,825 California sea otters for the 2004 spring survey, led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The 2004 total marked the 2nd consecutive year the threatened population has shown an appreciable increase in numbers, up 12.8 percent over the 2003 total of 2,505 otters.

USGS
May 27, 2004

A group of federal and university scientists today announced the launch of the Western Mountain Initiative, a 5-year effort funded by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to better understand ongoing changes in the mountains of the western United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

New U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science reaffirms, with strong genetic evidence, that the northern spotted owl is a separate subspecies from California and Mexican spotted owls. The same study also found no significant genetic differences between Mexican and California spotted owls.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

New U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science reaffirms, with strong genetic evidence, that the northern spotted owl is a separate subspecies from California and Mexican spotted owls. The same study also found no significant genetic differences between Mexican and California spotted owls.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.