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Filter Total Items: 364
An experimental garden nestled against the La Salle Mountains in Utah.
Date Published: August 5, 2017
Status: Active

RestoreNet: Distributed Field Trial Network for Dryland Restoration

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers and land managers are co-producing a network of restoration field trial sites on DOI and surrounding lands in the southwestern U.S. The network systematically tests restoration treatments across a broad range of landscape, soil, and climate conditions. Each site in the network is used to test suitable seed mixes and treatments that promote plant...

Contacts: Seth Munson, Molly McCormick, Katie Laushman, Rebecca Mann, Brad Butterfield, Elise Gornish, Loralee Larios, Akasha Faist, Helen Rowe
Natural Hazards
Date Published: August 5, 2017
Status: Active

Hazards Societal Consequences and Risk Communication

The Hazards Societal Consequences and Risk Communication project is led by Anne Wein at the Western Geographic Science Center (WGSC).

The umbrella project is Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR), which estimates consequences of natural hazard disaster scenarios as a strategy to engage decision-makers in increasing a community’s ability to cope with the effects of a disaster....

Nehalem town with tsunami evacuation sign
Date Published: June 22, 2017
Status: Active

Land use and tsunami hazards in the Pacific Northwest

Tsunamis have the potential to cause considerable damage to communities along the U.S. Pacific Northwest coastline. As coastal communities expand over time, the potential societal impact of tsunami inundation changes.

To understand how community exposure to tsunami hazards may change in coming decades, we projected future development (i.e. urban, residential, and rural), households, and...

Kings Canyon view
Date Published: June 22, 2017
Status: Active

California land-change projections

This dataset consists of modeled projections of land use and land cover and population for the State of California for the period 1970-2101. For the 1970-2001 period, we used the USGS's LUCAS model to "backcast" LULC, beginning with the 2001 initial conditions and ending with 1970. For future projections, the model was initialized in 2001 and run forward on an annual time step to 2100. In...

Image of Yosemite Valley
Date Published: June 22, 2017
Status: Active

Land use and carbon modeling in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

The goal of this study was to develop an integrated, regional-scale terrestrial carbon model, which can project changes in ecosystem carbon dynamics resulting from both changing biophysical conditions (e.g. CO2 fertilization, changes in climate) and land-change processes (e.g. urbanization, agricultural intensification, wildfire, harvest).

Our objective was to develop a modeling...

Rodeo Lagoon, Golden Gate National Recreational Area, California
Date Published: June 9, 2017
Status: Active

Role Nutrients Play in Fish Death Rates at Rodeo Lagoon

Scientists investigate excessive nutients levels in Rodeo Lagoon that are believed to be cause of dying fish

Road washed out during summer storm at Scotty's Castle, Death Valley, CA
Date Published: June 8, 2017
Status: Active

Delineation of Flood-Inundation Areas in Grapevine Canyon near Scotty’s Castle, Death Valley National Park, California

On October 18, 2015 an intense, nearly stationary, thunderstorm triggered flooding in Grapevine Canyon. Grapevine Canyon Road, power and water infrastructure, and several buildings at Scotty’s Castle were damaged by the flood water, necessitating closure of the area to the public. In response to the flood event, the National Park Service requested the USGS Nevada Water Science Center perform a...

Exposure of the San Andreas Fault in a trench.
Date Published: June 1, 2017
Status: Completed

Back to the Future on the San Andreas Fault

Release Date: JUNE 1, 2017

Investigating Past Earthquakes to Inform the Future

What does the science say? Where does the information come from? And what does it mean? Investigating past earthquakes to inform the future. Maybe you’ve heard that the “Big One is overdue” on the San Andreas Fault. No one can predict earthquakes, so what does the science really say? Where...

Photograph of California coastal Highway 1 looking north toward Big Sur.
Date Published: May 31, 2017
Status: Active

Big Sur Landslide

On May 20, 2017, the steep slopes at Mud Creek on California’s Big Sur coast, about 140 miles south of San Francisco, suffered a catastrophic collapse. USGS Scientists from the Pacific Coastal and Marine and the Geology, Minerals, Energy, and Geophysics Science Centers are monitoring this section of the coastline, in collaboration with the California Department of Transportation.

Wild and Scenic Amargosa River, California
Date Published: May 26, 2017
Status: Active

Estimating Annual Groundwater Discharge by Evapotranspiration Along the Wild and Scenic Portion of the Amargosa River

The USGS Nevada Water Science Center is refining estimates of annual groundwater discharge along the Wild and Scenic portion of the Amargosa River (AWSR) and adjacent spring discharge areas. Discharge estimates will be based on evapotranspiration (ET) measurements made along the Amargosa River during a 2-year period, previous estimates of evapotranspiration rates, and remote sensing techniques...

Contacts: Michael Pavelko
Model area for the Southern Amargosa eMbedded Model (SAMM), Nevada and California
Date Published: April 27, 2017

Evaluation of Groundwater Flow in the Southern Part of the Amargosa Desert, Nevada and California

Since the original publication of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) numerical model in 2004, more information on the regional groundwater flow system in the form of new data and interpretations has been compiled. Cooperators such as the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Department of Energy, and Nye County, Nevada,...

Contacts: Wayne Belcher
Close-up of an Agassiz's desert tortoise with tortoise looking towards camera. Tortoise is on a rocky, arid hill slope.
Date Published: April 19, 2017
Status: Active

Epidemiology of Infectious and Other Diseases in Agassiz’s Desert Tortoise

Agassiz’s Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) was listed as threatened in 1990 under the Endangered Species Act. WERC’s Dr. Kristin Berry leads studies on the cause of diseases in populations of Agassiz’s Desert Tortoise across the Mojave and western Sonoran deserts in southern California.

Contacts: Kristin Berry
Filter Total Items: 354
USGS
January 1, 2017

Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario.
The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for Souther

USGS
January 1, 2017

This data release contains information on gravity cores that were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in the area of San Pablo Bay and Carquinez Strait, California in 1990, 1991, and 2000. Ten (10) pdf files describe gravity cores that were split, photographed, and imaged by X-rays, and another pdf file contains a core-log legend. In addition, a shapefile (sanpablo_spls.s

USGS
January 1, 2017

The U.S. Geological Survey collected groundwater samples from 71 domestic wells and 4 springs in Nevada, Yuba, Sierra, and Placer Counties, California in 2015-2016. The sites were sampled for the Yuba and Bear Watersheds Shallow Aquifer Study Unit of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project%E

USGS
January 1, 2017

Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario.
The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for Souther

USGS
January 1, 2017

Files contain hydrodynamic and sediment transport data for the location and deployment indicated. Time-series data of water depth, velocity, turbidity, and temperature were collected in San Pablo Bay and China Camp Marsh as part of the San Francisco Bay Marsh Sediment Experiments. Several instruments were deployed in tidal creek, marsh, mudflat, and Bay locations, gathering data on

USGS
January 1, 2017

Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario.
The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS

USGS
January 1, 2017

Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario.
The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS

USGS
January 1, 2017

This part of the data release presents a digital elevation model (DEM) created from bathymetry data collected on February 1, 2011, in the Sacramento River from the confluence of the Feather River to Knights Landing. The data were collected by the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC) team with collaboration and funding from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This proje

USGS
January 1, 2017

Projected Hazard: Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario.
Model Summary: The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-l

USGS
January 1, 2017

The U.S. Geological Survey collected groundwater samples from 95 domestic wells in Tulare and Kings Counties, California in 2014-2015. The wells were sampled for the Tulare Shallow Aquifer Study Unit of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project’s assessment of the quality of groundwater reso

USGS
January 1, 2017

Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario.
The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS

USGS
January 1, 2017

Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario.
The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for So

Filter Total Items: 319
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 1994

Accounting for Consumptive Use of Lower Colorado River Water in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah

In the Colorado River valley between the east end of Lake Mead and the international boundary with Mexico (see figure), the river is the principal source of water for agricultural, domestic, municipal, industrial, hydroelectric-power generation, and recreational purposes. Water is stored in surface reservoirs and in the river aquifer---permeable...

Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.; Wilson, Richard P.
Accounting for Consumptive Use of Lower Colorado River Water in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah; 1994; FS; 074-94; Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.; Wilson, Richard P.

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Year Published: 1994

Chapter A. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Loss estimation and procedures

This Professional Paper includes a collection of papers on subjects ranging from evaluation of building safety, to human injuries, to correlation of ground deformation with building damage. What these papers share is a common goal to improve the tools available to the research community to measure the nature, extent, and causes of damage and...

Tubbesing, Susan K.
Chapter A. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Loss Estimation and Procedures; 1994; PP; 1553-A; The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Societal Response; Edited by Tubbesing, Susan K.

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Year Published: 1994

Chapter A. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Strong ground motion

Strong ground motion generated by the Loma Prieta, Calif., earthquake (MS~7.1) of October 17, 1989, resulted in at least 63 deaths, more than 3,757 injuries, and damage estimated to exceed $5.9 billion. Strong ground motion severely damaged critical lifelines (freeway overpasses, bridges, and pipelines), caused severe damage to poorly constructed...

Borcherdt, Roger D.
Chapter A. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Strong Ground Motion; 1994; PP; 1551-A; The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Strong Ground Motion and Ground Failure; Edited by Borcherdt, Roger D.

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Year Published: 1994

Chapter C. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Fire, police, transportation and hazardous materials

The papers in this chapter discuss some of the failures and successes that resulted from the societal response by a multitude of agencies to the Loma Prieta earthquake. Some of the lessons learned were old ones relearned. Other lessons were obvious ones which had gone unnoticed. Still, knowledge gained from past earthquakes spawned planning and...

Van Anne, Craig; Scawthorn, Charles R.
Chapter C. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Fire, Police, Transportation and Hazardous Materials; 1994; PP; 1553-C; The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Societal Response; Edited by Van Anne, Craig; Scawthorn, Charles R.

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Year Published: 1994

Chapter E. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Hydrologic disturbances

Seismic events have long been known to cause changes in the level of oceans, streams, lakes, and the water table. The great San Francisco earthquake of 1906 induced significant hydrologic changes that were qualitatively similar to those changes observed for the Loma Prieta earthquake. What is different is that the hydrologic data sets collected...

Rojstaczer, Stuart A.
Chapter E. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Hydrologic Disturbances; 1994; PP; 1551-E; The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Strong Ground Motion and Ground Failure; Edited by Rojstaczer, Stuart A.

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Year Published: 1994

Chapter F. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Tectonic processes and models

If there is a single theme that unifies the diverse papers in this chapter, it is the attempt to understand the role of the Loma Prieta earthquake in the context of the earthquake 'machine' in northern California: as the latest event in a long history of shocks in the San Francisco Bay region, as an incremental contributor to the regional...

Simpson, Robert W.
Chapter F. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Tectonic Processes and Models; 1994; PP; 1550-F; The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Earthquake Occurrence; Edited by Simpson, Robert W.

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Year Published: 1994

Irrigation water supply and demand data for 1976, 1980, and 1984 for the western San Joaquin Valley, California

This report presents the irrigation water supply and demand data for 1976, 1980, and 1984 for 32 water districts in the western San Joaquin Valley, California. Data are provided for each water district or each of the three years if the data were available. The complete data base is given by water district or each township, range, and section in...

Templin, W.E.; Haltom, T.C.
Irrigation water supply and demand data for 1976, 1980, and 1984 for the western San Joaquin Valley, California; 1994; OFR; 94-335; Templin, W. E.; Haltom, T. C.

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Year Published: 1994

Method to identify wells that yield water that will be replaced by Colorado River water in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah

Accounting for the use of Colorado River water is required by the U.S. Supreme Court decree, 1964, Arizona v. California. Water pumped from wells on the flood plain and from certain wells on alluvial slopes outside the flood plain is presumed to be river water and is accounted for as Colorado River water. A method was developed to identify wells...

Wilson, Richard P.; Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.
Method to identify wells that yield water that will be replaced by Colorado River water in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah; 1994; WRI; 94-4005; Wilson, Richard P.; Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.

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Year Published: 1993

Chapter C. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Preseismic observations

The October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta, Calif., Ms=7.1 earthquake provided the first opportunity in the history of fault monitoring in the United States to gather multidisciplinary preearthquake data in the near field of an M=7 earthquake. The data obtained include observations on seismicity, continuous strain, long-term ground displacement, magnetic...

Johnston, Malcolm J. S.
Chapter C. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Preseismic Observations; 1993; PP; 1550-C; The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Earthquake Occurrence; Edited by Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

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Year Published: 1993

The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Earthquake occurrence

Professional Paper 1550 seeks to understand the M6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake itself. It examines how the fault that generated the earthquake ruptured, searches for and evaluates precursors that may have indicated an earthquake was coming, reviews forecasts of the earthquake, and describes the geology of the earthquake area and the crustal forces...

Coordinated by Bakun, William H.; Prescott, William H.
The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Earthquake Occurrence; 1993; PP; 1550; Coordinated by Bakun, William H.; Prescott, William H.

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Year Published: 1993

The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Societal response

Professional Paper 1553 describes how people and organizations responded to the earthquake and how the earthquake impacted people and society. The investigations evaluate the tools available to the research community to measure the nature, extent, and causes of damage and losses. They describe human behavior during and immediately after the...

Coordinated by Mileti, Dennis S.
The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Societal Response; 1993; PP; 1553; Coordinated by Mileti, Dennis S.

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Year Published: 1993

The Loma Prieta, California, earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Public response: Chapter B in The Loma Prieta, California, earthquake of October 17, 1989: Societal Response (Professional Paper 1553)

Major earthquakes provide seismologists and engineers an opportunity to examine the performance of the Earth and the man-made structures in response to the forces of the quake. So, too, do they provide social scientists an opportunity to delve into human responses evoked by the ground shaking and its physical consequences. The findings from such...

Bolton, Patricia A.
Chapter B. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Public Response; 1993; PP; 1553-B; The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Societal Response; Edited by Bolton, Patricia A.

Filter Total Items: 1,161
3D map of Mud Creek slide derived from video footage collected by drone on October 12, 2017.
October 12, 2017

Mud Creek – 3D Point Cloud – Oblique Perspective

Video shot from drones yields details about changing landslide on California’s Big Sur coast

On October 12, USGS drones collected video footage of the Mud Creek landslide, which buried California State Highway 1 under a third-of-a-mile-wide mass of rock and dirt on May 20. USGS scientists have been monitoring the slide by transforming photos shot

...
Satellite image that shows the fires in California wine country.
October 11, 2017

Wildfires Devastate California Wine Country

Residents had little warning when wildfires that ignited late Sunday night, October 8, 2017, were fanned by wind gusts of 50 miles per hour and blasted across California's wine country. More than 100,000 acres have burned as of October 11, with less than 6 percent of the fires contained.

September 28, 2017

2017 September Evening Public Lecture — What's in a species name?

Title: What's in a species Name?: How wildlife management relies on modern systematics research and museum collections
* What have museum collections taught us about invasive diseases?
* When is an endangered species not a species?
* How can birds in a museum help protect airline passengers?
* How do geology and biology govern what species we find on

...
Aerial imagery overlain by modeled evapotranspiration from a field
September 27, 2017

Aerial imagery overlain by modeled evapotranspiration from a field

Aerial imagery overlain by modeled evapotranspiration from a field. Image used as cover art for Scientific Investigations Report 2017-5087

 USGS scientist Carol Reiss holding a hydrothermal vent sample; hydrothermal vent poster in the background
September 12, 2017

USGS scientist Carol Reiss holding a hydrothermal vent sample

USGS scientist Carol Reiss holding a hydrothermal vent sample. The poster in the background is a scientific rendering by Véronique Robigou (then at University of Washington) of a hydrothermal vent deposit with the submersible Alvin drawn to scale. This structure stood 45 meters above the seafloor when it was discovered by University of Washington researchers using Alvin

...
Carol Reiss examining hydrothermal vent sample using hand lens
September 12, 2017

USGS geologist Carol Reiss examining hydrothermal vent sample

USGS geologist Carol Reiss examining hydrothermal vent sample using hand lens. Sulfide-silicate minerals precipitate from 330°C mineral laden water venting along volcanically active spreading ridges.

August 31, 2017

2017 August Evening Public Lecture — Roving on Mars

Roving on Mars: Curiosity's exploration of Gale Crater

* Overview of the Mars Science Laboratory Mission
* Highlights from 5 years of exploring sedimentary environments
* Preview of next steps in Curiosity's climb up Aeolis Mons

Aerial view of coastal bluffs, marine terrace with farmland, beach in distance with lagoon, highway runs along coast.
August 18, 2017

Scott Creek area of California coast

Aerial photograph looking north, Scott Creek Beach in distance, along the California coast near Davenport.

Photo of driftwood and sand dunes at Point Reyes National Seashore
August 7, 2017

Driftwood and Dunes - Point Reyes

Photo of driftwood, and invasive grasses and iceplant at Point Reyes National Seashore, CA. Such "dune drainages" make surprising habitat for a threatened species of amphibian: the California red-legged frog.

Photo of dead trees and forest at Point Reyes National Seashore
August 7, 2017

Trees at Point Reyes National Seashore

Dead trees like the ones featured in this photo still provide valuable habitat for wildlife, including birds.

View from sky of a river mouth where it meets the ocean but it's blocked by a natural sand levee; with a bridge over the river.
August 4, 2017

San Gregorio Beach and Creek

Flow from San Gregorio Creek in San Gregorio, California is often blocked by a natural sand levee when the flow is not strong enough to push through to the Pacific Ocean.

WERC researcher conducting elevation surveys in San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge
July 31, 2017

WERC Elevation surveys in San Pablo Bay NWR

WERC researcher conducting elevation surveys in San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge

Filter Total Items: 912
USGS science for a changing world logo
May 7, 2014

Results of a new hydrologic model show a decrease in groundwater levels in response to pumping, which in turn causes a reduction in groundwater discharge to streams, a reduction in groundwater evapotranspiration, and a reduction in groundwater storage in the Santa Rosa Plain watershed.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 30, 2014

The coastal geology of Simeonof Island, the southeastern-most island in the Shumagin archipelago of the Aleutian Islands, suggests the region has not experienced a great megathrust earthquake in at least the past 3,400 years.

Catastrophic Earthquakes – In a Crowded World Public Lecture Flyer
April 22, 2014

Why have there been so many catastrophic earthquakes at the beginning of the 21stcentury? On April 24th, USGS Research Geologist Thomas Holzer will tell us the history and future of earthquake death tolls, and the urbanization of the planet. Find out what makes modern megacities vulnerable to natural hazards.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 22, 2014

Inorganic trace elements – fluoride, arsenic, molybdenum and boron – were detected at high concentrations in 42 percent of groundwater used for public supply in the Borrego Valley, and southern desert areas of California, according to a recent study by the U.S. Geological Survey. The USGS evaluated the quality of untreated groundwater for this study – not treated tap water.

Image:  Desert Perchlorate Field Work
April 3, 2014

Newly published research is the first to characterize the distribution and interactions of natural perchlorate in a terrestrial ecosystem. The study results are important in assessing risks associated with ecological and human health and with potential movement of natural perchlorate contamination into groundwater.

Lecture flyer thumbnail
March 24, 2014

How much will California's climate warm in future decades and what are the greatest vulnerabilities to climate change? On March 27th, USGS Climate Researcher Dan Cayan will explain about how scientists are investigating the way climate change might impact resources that are crucial to the state, including the Sierra Nevada snowpack, California coastal sea levels and the San Francisco Bay and Delta

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 20, 2014

Why does the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake Matter 50 Years Later? Scientific experts will talk about a half-century of scientific and monitoring advances triggered by the 1964 events.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 17, 2014

How does drought affect California's water supply? Does it impact the surface water only, or what about groundwater? How does it impact water quality? What about streamflow? How is the water shortage affecting ecosystems? How is the drought related to climate change?

Screenshot Location of Mammoth Mountain
February 18, 2014

The earthquake swarm under Mammoth Mountain which started on February 3, 2014 has declined over the past few days. The daily numbers of earthquakes, however, are not yet at background levels. Most earthquakes were (are) M1.5 and less.

Screenshot Location of Mammoth Mountain
February 6, 2014

An earthquake swarm under Mammoth Mountain (Mono County, CA), which started slowly on February 3, 2014 intensified in the early hours of February 5 with many small-magnitude earthquakes occurring in rapid succession, a phenomenon known as "spasmodic bursts."

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 21, 2014

What is all the buzz about in the Yellowstone area? Is it really dangerous? On January 23rd Jake Lowenstern, Scientist-in-Charge of Yellowstone Volcano Observatory will explain what is happening now with earthquakes, ground uplift, and steam explosions.

Image: Gary Scoppettone
January 16, 2014

Today, the Department of Interior honored U.S. Geological Survey biologist Gary Scoppettone and his colleagues for helping land managers save two species of fish from extinction. The species of unique desert fish, Cui-ui and Lahontan cutthroat trout, are considered sacred to the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada.