Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,120
June 24, 2010

PubTalk 6/2010 — Monterey Canyon - Superhighway to the Deep-Sea

USGS-MBARI Cooperative Oceanographic Research

By Charles K. Paull, Senior Scientist Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA 

 

  • Monterey Bay provides a diverse 4,000 meter-deep "laboratory" for both biologists and geologists
  • Ocean studies are providing critical information on climate change,
Image: California Brown Pelicans
June 8, 2010

California Brown Pelicans

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
Image: California Brown Pelican
June 8, 2010

California Brown Pelican

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
May 27, 2010

PubTalk 5/2010 — The Heat is On: Desert Tortoises & Survival

A New USGS documentary video exploring the world of the mojave desert tortoise

Introduced & discussed by USGS Ecologist Todd Esque & Ken Nussear, Wildlife Biologist 

 

  • The Mojave Desert tortoise, an important indicator of desert ecosystem health, is being threatened by habitat loss, predators, wildfire, and
April 29, 2010

PubTalk 4/2010 — Large, Destructive Earthquakes in Haiti and Chile

Lessons Learned for the San Francisco Bay Area

by USGS Geophysicists, Walter Mooney & Eric Geist 

 

  • Why was the January 2010 magnitude 7.0 earthquake in Haiti the 4th deadliest in history?
  • What have scientists discovered from seismology, satellite observations, and field investigations?
  • The Chilean
March 25, 2010

PubTalk 3/2010 — Changing Times-- A Changing Planet!

Using phenology to take the pulse of our planet

By Jake F. Weltzin, Executive Director, USA National Phenology Network

  • Citizens, scientists and natural resources managers are teaming-up to track biological events and cycles responding to changing climate
  • Phenology is providing new insights into seasonal changes in
February 25, 2010

PubTalk 2/2010 — ARkSTORM

A Scenario of a Massive West Coast Storm

By Dale Cox, Project Manager, USGS Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project

 

  • Scientists are preparing ARkStorm for emergency planning and disaster preparedness
  • A series of "Atmospheric River" events slams into the West Coast with hurricane force overal several weeks
  • Weather
Image: Debris Flow Damage in California
February 8, 2010

Debris Flow Damage in California

House damaged by debris flows generated in Mullally Canyon in response to a rainstorm on February 6, 2010. The drainage basin above this home was burned the previous summer by the Station Fire, the largest fire in the history of Los Angeles County.

Attribution: Natural Hazards
January 29, 2010

PubTalk 1/2010 — Coral Reefs, the 6th Extinction, and You

By Michael Field, Senior Marine Geologist

 

  • Five major episodes of biological extinction have occurred on Earth during geologic time -- what caused these extinctions and why are they relevant today?
  • Scientists are concerned that life on Earth may be facing a 6th major extinction, severely limiting the biodiversity of animals and
Photograph showing bluff erosion during the 2009-10 El Nino, undermining the Great Hwy guardrail at Ocean Beach, San Francisco.
January 20, 2010

Bluff Erosion From El Nino (2009-2010)

Bluff erosion during the 2009–10 El Niño undermined the Great Highway guardrail at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California. The shoreline eroded, on average, 55 meters that winter, leading to lane closures on the highway and an emergency $5-million revetment along the base of this bluff.

Photograph of bluff erosion in 2010 undermining the Great Highway at the southern end of Ocean Beach, San Francisco.
January 20, 2010

Bluff Erosion From El Nino 2010

Bluff erosion during the 2009–10 El Niño undermined the Great Highway guardrail at the southern end of Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California. The shoreline eroded, on average, 55 meters that winter, leading to lane closures on the highway and an emergency $5-million revetment along the base of this bluff. Photo taken by Jeff Hansen, USGS, 20 January 2010.

Image: Severe Coastal Erosion During an El Niño Storm
January 19, 2010

Severe Coastal Erosion During an El Niño Storm

Severe bluff erosion, along the southern end of Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, including damage to the guard rail of the Great Highway (Calif. Hwy.1). The severe winter erosion led to lane closures of the highway and an emergency, $5 million revetment along the base of this bluff. This storm damage occurred during the 2009-2010 El Niño, which, on average, eroded

...
Filter Total Items: 980
USGS science for a changing world logo
August 8, 2003

Wesley Ward has been named Regional Executive for Geology for the Western Region of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The announcement of Ward’s new appointment was made by John D. Buffington, Western Regional Director, effective Aug. 11, 2003.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 15, 2003

A recent report published by the U.S. Geological Survey documents nonnative plants in Sequoia-Kings Canyon and Yosemite national parks, and provides a useful template for ranking alien species problems for management actions in these and other national parks and reserves. 

USGS
July 15, 2003

A recent report published by the U.S. Geological Survey documents nonnative plants in Sequoia-Kings Canyon and Yosemite national parks, and provides a useful template for ranking alien species problems for management actions in these and other national parks and reserves.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 21, 2003

Frogs, salamanders and fishes are not exactly the first species one thinks about as wildlife affected by fire – after all, they live in water – but a special June issue of Forest Ecology and Management points out that the response of these species to habitat changes induced by fire and fuels reduction practices is highly variable.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 6, 2003

Counters tallied a total of 2,505 California sea otters in 2003, 17 percent more sea otters than the total of 2,139 otters in 2002, according to a survey led by the U.S. Geological Survey. Excellent to good counting conditions sped the 2003 census to a near-record time, running May 10-15.

USGS
June 6, 2003

Counters tallied a total of 2,505 California sea otters in 2003, 17 percent more sea otters than the total of 2,139 otters in 2002, according to a survey led by the U.S. Geological Survey. Excellent to good counting conditions sped the 2003 census to a near-record time, running May 10-15.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 15, 2003

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and their partners studying the largest on-land earthquake in North America in almost 150 years report new information that will help further safety-planning efforts for future large quakes, according to an article published in the May 16, 2003, edition of the journal Science.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 24, 2003

The earth has subsided as much as four inches in parts of the Mojave Desert in southern California, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists. 

USGS
February 24, 2003

The earth has subsided as much as four inches in parts of the Mojave Desert in southern California, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 19, 2002

 

Following a series of intense rainstorms over the past weekend (Dec.13-17), the annual winter landslide season has begun once again in the San Francisco Bay region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) advises that moisture levels in local soils have now reached the point (soil saturation) that is considered a precondition for future landslide activity in most of the region

USGS
December 19, 2002

Following a series of intense rainstorms over the past weekend (Dec.13-17), the annual winter landslide season has begun once again in the San Francisco Bay region.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 6, 2002

Standard fare in geology textbooks and school classrooms across the world is that the hot springs, geysers and volcanoes of Yellowstone National Park, Hawaii, Iceland, and many other volcanic regions were "created" by plumes of hot rock that rise from near the Earth’s core. New results from recently published U.S. Geological Survey research hint, astonishingly, that such plumes may not exist.