Unified Interior Regions

District of Columbia

Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States is located in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. East Coast and had an estimated population of 672,228 as of July 2015. The Potomac River forms the District's border with Virginia and has two major tributaries: the Anacostia River and Rock Creek.The District has 7,464 acres of parkland, occupying about 19% of the city's total area.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C.  Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 177
USGS
February 7, 2008

For several years, scientists have been working to determine why so many male smallmouth bass in the Potomac River basin have immature female egg cells in their testes - a form of intersex. They are closer to finding an answer.

USGS
January 24, 2008

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will host Congressional briefings on how science can be used to prepare for and react to hurricanes and will issue a new report, "Science and the Storms: The USGS Response to the Hurricanes of 2005."

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 6, 2007

You are invited to attend an event co-hosted by The Embassy of Afghanistan and the Afghan-American Chamber of Commerce where the U.S. Geological Survey will unveil a 2007 preliminary assessment of non-fuel mineral resources of Afghanistan. 

USGS
September 24, 2007

Scientific evidence has shown that the Earth has warmed abruptly many times in the past, sometimes more than 10° F in just a few decades. Is today's gradual global warming a precursor to abrupt climate change? What are the key indicators that could help predict an abrupt rise in temperature? 

USGS
July 24, 2007

In the coming decades, climate change may significantly affect how we choose to use energy resources. Decisionmakers need accurate information about national and global resources, both conventional and unconventional, to develop realistic energy mix scenarios, climate change models and response strategies.

USGS
May 25, 2007

WASHINGTON, D.C. - On May 30, the Embassy of Afghanistan will host U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) officials as they unveil an earthquake hazards assessment of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

USGS
April 24, 2007

In the coming decades, climate change may significantly alter the availability of water across the United States and beyond.  Growing population centers in already stressed areas, such as the arid West, will be particularly challenged. 

USGS
April 16, 2007

Typically thought of as a symbol of the West, coyotes have expanded their range to include the Washington, D.C. area, the last major urban area in the continental U.S. to become their territory. 

USGS
January 17, 2007

The discovery of a high incidence of intersex (male fish exhibiting female characteristics) in smallmouth bass of the Potomac River Basin has prompted an investigation of water quality and wastewater discharge into the upper Potomac, and blood-plasma studies on this fish species.

USGS
December 20, 2006

The USGS has released a report on the chemical and ecological health of Rock Creek in Washington, D.C. The report documents the results of a two-year study of chemical contaminants in the sediments and the health implication of these chemicals to white sucker, a common bottom-dwelling fish that lives in the stream.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 20, 2006

The USGS has released a report on the chemical and ecological health of Rock Creek in Washington, D.C. The report documents the results of a two-year study of chemical contaminants in the sediments and the health implication of these chemicals to white sucker, a common bottom-dwelling fish that lives in the stream.

USGS
September 7, 2006

Even after the smoke clears from a wildfire, the danger is not over. Other hazards such as debris flows (fast-moving, destructive landslides) can also occur in the aftermath of a wildfire. 

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C.  Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water