Unified Interior Regions

District of Columbia

Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States is located in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. East Coast and had an estimated population of 672,228 as of July 2015. The Potomac River forms the District's border with Virginia and has two major tributaries: the Anacostia River and Rock Creek.The District has 7,464 acres of parkland, occupying about 19% of the city's total area.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C.  Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 176
USGS
July 18, 2001

Question: What do hemlock adelgid, leafy spurge, Asian swamp eel, and round gobe have in common?

Answer: All are non-native, invasive species and they, and others, are costing the United States billions per year in damage to agriculture, forests, rangelands, and fisheries. Serious efforts are underway to stem the tide of this invasion and to preserve our nation’s native biological heritage.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 8, 2001

Invasive plants and animals will be on display at the briefing including a brown tree snake, round gobe (a species of fish),Asian swamp eel, sea lamprey, giant salvinia, cheatgrass, kudzu,and hemlock adelgid.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 20, 2001

Fact: The United States needs energy supplies that are secure, uninterrupted, sustainable, and economically and environmentally viable. And, it is estimated that over the next 20 years, the U.S. demand for energy may increase by as much as 32 percent.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 28, 2001

Learn how state and local water agencies use ground-water information from the USGS to address ground water and subsidence issues and, at the same time, preserve one of our nation’s most critical natural resources at a briefing, "Ground-Water Resources for the Future."

USGS
March 28, 2001

Learn how state and local water agencies use ground-water information from the USGS to address ground water and subsidence issues and, at the same time, preserve one of our nation’s most critical natural resources at a briefing, "Ground-Water Resources for the Future."

USGS
March 15, 2001

March will mark the beginning of a new field season for scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its cooperators who will begin drilling a second core hole into an impact structure created 35 million years ago when an asteroid or comet slammed into the ocean near the present-day mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 22, 2001

Biological wildfire. The green cancer. For invasive plants, scientists say, these labels may even be understatements since, over time, non-native plant invasions can spread to unmanageable levels, often leaving extinctions and altered ecosystems in their wake. And, they cost the U.S. billions of dollars annually while presenting an ecological threat that researchers say is second only to habitat d

USGS
December 5, 2000

A special opportunity for the news media to meet premiere scientists working on amphibians. They’ll discuss the issues: Why are amphibian populations declining? Why are more amphibians being found with deformities? Are amphibian die-offs increasing? What are the implications for other forms of life?

USGS
November 7, 2000

Despite the lack of rain, many of the streamflow and ground-water levels in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were normal for October, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
October 6, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were above normal or in the upper part of the normal range for September, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
September 8, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels at the end of August in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region were generally above or in the upper part of the normal range, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
August 7, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels at the end of July in the Maryland-Delaware-DC region were generally in the upper part of the normal range, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C.  Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water