Unified Interior Regions

District of Columbia

Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States is located in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. East Coast and had an estimated population of 672,228 as of July 2015. The Potomac River forms the District's border with Virginia and has two major tributaries: the Anacostia River and Rock Creek.The District has 7,464 acres of parkland, occupying about 19% of the city's total area.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C.  Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 177
USGS
August 7, 2000

Streamflow and ground-water levels at the end of July in the Maryland-Delaware-DC region were generally in the upper part of the normal range, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
July 7, 2000

Chesapeake Bay Inflow in June Four Times Higher Than Drought of 1999.

USGS
June 6, 2000

Below-normal precipitation in May (24% below average at BWI airport) in combination with seasonal increases in evapotranspiration resulted in lower ground-water levels and decreased streamflow in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
May 26, 2000

USGS Science at AGU: Coasts In Crisis, Educating Native Americans, and Science In Cities

USGS
May 5, 2000

Levels increase in ground water and streamflow during April Substantially above-normal precipitation in April resulted in generally high ground-water levels and full reservoirs in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
April 7, 2000

Continued normal precipitation in March helped to replenish ground-water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
March 7, 2000

Precipitation in February helped to replenish ground-water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
February 8, 2000

Snowfall in January has had minimal impact on replenishing ground water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
December 6, 1999

Below-average streamflows in November caused a drop in reservoir levels and could signal a return to drought conditions if the trend continues over the winter months.

USGS
November 4, 1999

In October, the average daily flow rate in the Potomac River at Little Falls was 5.4 billion gallons per day (bgd) or about 290 percent of the normal October flow rate (1.9 bgd), according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). During October, flow varied from a high of about 15.3 bgd to a low of about 2.1 bgd.

USGS
October 14, 1999

Dick Thompson, Time magazine science correspondent, is the featured speaker in the Department of the Interior 150th Anniversary lecture series. Thompson’s presentation, "Taking a Volcano’s Pulse: The Evolution of the Science of Volcano Monitoring from Mt. St. Helens to Mt. Pinatubo," is sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
September 23, 1999

While much of eastern North Carolina remains under water, U.S. Geological Survey scientists and hydrologic technicians are boating over rooftops, submerged cars, and bridges and roads topped by deep water to collect data and determine the amount of environmental damage done by Hurricane Floyd’s heavy rains.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C.  Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water