Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

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Filter Total Items: 177
Date published: April 15, 2016
Status: Active

Ecosystem Development After Wetland Restoration and Creation

Wetland restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as means to compensate for wetland losses. To address the need for evaluating the development of ecosystem structure and function in restored and created wetlands, USGS compared created tidal wetlands sites to natural mangrove wetlands in Tampa Bay, Florida. 

Date published: April 13, 2016

Understanding Coastal Change

Scientists perform a range of studies that document, assess, and model coastal change, risk, and vulnerability. Studies include historical shoreline change, the geologic structure and history of coastal regions, sediment supply and transport, sea-level rise, and how extreme storm events affect rates and impacts of coastal change.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Geologic Hazards and Catastrophic Events

We study the distribution and hazard potential of coastal and submarine events such as earthquakes and submarine landslides and associated tsunami potential, hurricane induced coastal inundation, extreme storms, sea-level rise and oil and gas spills. We also model development to help evaluate and forecast coastal hazard probability and occurrence.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Ocean Resources for America's Needs

Our scientists conduct research studies focused on geologic mapping, sampling and understanding of mineral and energy resources and studies of the geologic setting and processes to inform renewable energy development offshore.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Science

We bring together multidisciplinary expertise focused on developing tools and models to improve understanding of how healthy ecosystems function as well as how they respond to environmental changes and human impacts including ecosystem restoration. Research studies address coral reef, coastal wetland, benthic habitat and groundwater resources.

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluating Structural and Surface Elevation Recovery of Restored Mangroves

Hydrologic restoration is one of several approaches to rehabilitate mangroves on a large-scale. USGS evaluates how solely restoring tidal hydrologic flows affect the recovery of mangroves in Florida. 

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Dynamics and Fluxes of Nutrients along Environmental Gradients in the Florida Everglades, USA

USGS research in the Florida Everglades will provide information on how environmental conditions and disturbances impact carbon storage in mangrove systems.

Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Completed

Identification of Previously Undocumented Florida Grasshopper Sparrow and Confirmation of the Current Population Status and Distribution

Population trends suggest that the Florida Grasshopper Sparrow may go extinct within five years. USGS research aims to collect demographic information to help identify the current status of the species.

Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Plant Community Dynamics in a Mangrove-to-Marsh Transition Zone

Mangroves will compete with salt marsh plants in transitional areas, and recent studies have documented the expansion of mangroves into marsh habitats. To better understand the plant community dynamics in this transition zone, USGS scientists are tracking vegeation changes over time in south Florida. 

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Efficacy of eDNA as an Early Detection and Rapid Response Indicator for Burmese Pythons in the Northern Greater Everglades Ecosystem

Traditional approaches to locating Burmese pythons - including visual searches and trapping - have resulted in low detection. Environmental DNA - or eDNA - is increasingly being used to detect the presence of non-native species, particularly when traditional methods may not be adequate. 

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Genetic Analysis of the Invasive Burmese Python to Aid Management and Population-Control Decision-Making

Invasive Burmese pythons threaten the success of Everglades restoration efforts. To assist with management and population control decision making, USGS scientists are implementing genetic studies to identify potential new entry pathways and to help quantify the size of the breeding population.

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Photo of Sunset Beach, Florida, during tropical storm Colin in June 2016
December 31, 2012

Photo of Sunset Beach, Florida, during tropical storm Colin, June 2016

Photo of Sunset Beach, Florida, during tropical storm Colin in June 2016. The storm resulted in large waves and elevated water levels that caused erosion in this area, as can be seen in the scarp forming at the vegetation line. CMHRP researchers surveyed the elevation of the beach before and after the storm to quantify the storm's impacts.

A SCUBA diver beside a Massive starlet coral on the sea floor at Dry Tortugas National Park
May 31, 2012

Diver with a Massive Starlet coral, Dry Tortugas National Park

A USGS diver beside a Massive Starlet (Siderastrea siderea) coral colony in Dry Tortugas National Park. Scientists used a core from this coral to reconstruct ocean temperatures going back to 1837. Photo: USGS, May 2012

A large boulder-shaped Massive Starlet coral on the sea floor in Dry Tortugas National Park
May 31, 2012

Massive Starlet coral at Dry Tortugas National Park

Scientists used a core from this Massive Starlet (Siderastrea siderea) coral colony in Dry Tortugas National Park to reconstruct ocean temperatures going back to 1837. Photo: USGS

Pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea
December 31, 2011

Pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea

Pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea leaves filled with water in a bog in northern Florida.

The North American pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea, is a unique system for characterizing microbial diversity and carbon cycling but it has been poorly studied from a microbiology perspective. The leaves of S. purpurea trap rainwater, creating a microscopic aquatic

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Image: Burmese Python Swimming in Florida Bay
November 16, 2011

Burmese Python Swimming in Florida Bay

Fishing guide Camp Walker, Catalyst Charters, of Islamorada, Fla.,  took this photo of a Burmese python swimming in Florida Bay from the end of Twisty Channel toward End Key on Nov. 16, 2011. 

Tangled web of prop roots from red mangrove trees, intermixed with black mangroves and white mangroves farther back in the photo
April 13, 2011

Mangrove forest, Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park

Tangled web of prop roots from red mangrove trees, intermixed with black mangroves and white mangroves farther back in the forest.  Mangrove forests cover much of the southwestern coastal region of Everglades National Park.  The red mangroves are the most salinity tolerant and grow with their prop roots in the water or within the range of high tide.

Rainbow Springs, Florida, USA
March 11, 2011

Spring water is usually clear and cool, which attracts swimmers.

Rainbow Springs, Florida, USA

A spring is a water resource formed when the side of a hill, a valley bottom or other excavation intersects a flowing body of groundwater at or below the local water table, below which the subsurface material is saturated with water. A spring is the result of an aquifer being filled to the point that the water overflows

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Photo of bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, with polyps extended, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa

Bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, with polyps extended, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see

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bleaching colony of star coral
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colonies of mountainous star coral, Montastraea faveolata

Bleaching colonies of mountainous star coral, Montastraea faveolata, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so

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Filter Total Items: 238
USGS
September 13, 2010

Gainesville, FL. -- The first genetic study to compare nuclear DNA of endangered Antillean manatees in Belize with Florida manatees confirmed their designation as separate subspecies. Belize’s manatees, however, were found to have extremely low genetic diversity, raising questions about their long-term genetic viability.

USGS
August 9, 2010

Identifying watersheds with naturally occurring geologic sources of phosphorus will be easier with the release of a new map by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
June 4, 2010

A wetland primer recently published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides a comprehensive new view of how central Florida’s freshwater wetlands function and how their benefits can contribute to environmental sustainability.

USGS
June 1, 2010

The importance of a ‘blanket effect’ caused by layers of fresh and salt water in two warmwater manatee refuges along the coast of southwest Florida has been documented by a team of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists. 

USGS
April 15, 2010

Ilya, an adventurous manatee that wandered as far north as Cape Cod last summer, has recently been sighted at several locations around Miami’s Biscayne Bay, confirmed U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) biologists.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 13, 2009

Five giant non-native snake species would pose high risks to the health of ecosystems in the United States should they become established here, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report released today.
The USGS report details the risks of nine non-native boa, anaconda and python species that are invasive or potentially invasive in the United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 1, 2009

Florida's upper Peace River can lose large quantities of water each day to sinkholes. This loss makes the river vulnerable to running dry during periods of low rainfall and limits its ability to support ecosystems and to provide water to residents downstream.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 22, 2009

From steamboats to jetskis, Florida's first streamgage in White Springs has seen it all. When the US Geological Survey (USGS) began first recording water levels and flows on the Suwannee River, this small North Florida town was in the midst of the state's first tourism boom. A report published by USGS this month chronicles a century of change at the state's first streamgage.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 14, 2009

Intersex in smallmouth and largemouth basses is widespread in numerous river basins throughout the United States is the major finding of the most comprehensive and large-scale evaluation of the condition, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research published online in Aquatic Toxicology.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 12, 2009

Pesticide-related compounds and elevated levels of nitrate have been found in lakes in central Florida's Lake Wales Ridge region. The compounds found include currently used pesticides, according to the recently published U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report.