Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

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Filter Total Items: 184
Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluating Structural and Surface Elevation Recovery of Restored Mangroves

Hydrologic restoration is one of several approaches to rehabilitate mangroves on a large-scale. USGS evaluates how solely restoring tidal hydrologic flows affect the recovery of mangroves in Florida. 

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Dynamics and Fluxes of Nutrients along Environmental Gradients in the Florida Everglades, USA

USGS research in the Florida Everglades will provide information on how environmental conditions and disturbances impact carbon storage in mangrove systems.

Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Completed

Identification of Previously Undocumented Florida Grasshopper Sparrow and Confirmation of the Current Population Status and Distribution

Population trends suggest that the Florida Grasshopper Sparrow may go extinct within five years. USGS research aims to collect demographic information to help identify the current status of the species.

Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Plant Community Dynamics in a Mangrove-to-Marsh Transition Zone

Mangroves will compete with salt marsh plants in transitional areas, and recent studies have documented the expansion of mangroves into marsh habitats. To better understand the plant community dynamics in this transition zone, USGS scientists are tracking vegeation changes over time in south Florida. 

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Efficacy of eDNA as an Early Detection and Rapid Response Indicator for Burmese Pythons in the Northern Greater Everglades Ecosystem

Traditional approaches to locating Burmese pythons - including visual searches and trapping - have resulted in low detection. Environmental DNA - or eDNA - is increasingly being used to detect the presence of non-native species, particularly when traditional methods may not be adequate. 

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Genetic Analysis of the Invasive Burmese Python to Aid Management and Population-Control Decision-Making

Invasive Burmese pythons threaten the success of Everglades restoration efforts. To assist with management and population control decision making, USGS scientists are implementing genetic studies to identify potential new entry pathways and to help quantify the size of the breeding population.

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Population Biology and Ecology of Diamondback Terrapins in Mangrove Forested Ecosystems in the Greater Everglades

Long-term capture-recapture research in the Everglades National Park provides baseline information on the Diamondback Terrapin, a species that may be threatened by human disturbances.

Date published: April 5, 2016

Benthic Habitat Characterization and Habitat Use of Endangered Sea Turtles in Marine Protected Areas of the Greater Everglades

USGS assesses how federally endangered sea turtles use the habitat in and around a no-take area in the Dry Tortugas National Park.

Date published: March 30, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluation of Tegu Movements and Habitat Use in Relation to Location and Habitat

Tegus are breeding, they have a diverse diet, and they are established in areas throughout South Florida. USGS is tracking this problematic reptile species to better understand their movements and habitat use to help managers prevent dispersal into new areas.

Date published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

Population Monitoring of the Federally Threatened Okaloosa Darter at Eglin Air Force Base

USGS' and Loyola University New Orleans' innovative research techniques played a role in the decision to downlist the Okaloosa Darter, a freshwater fish endemic to northwest Florida, from Endangered to Threatened.

Contacts: Howard Jelks
Date published: March 17, 2016
Status: Active

Using Environmental DNA for Burmese Python Detection Probabilities and Range-Delimitation in Southern Florida

Current tools for detection of Burmese pythons in South Florida have resulted in low detection rates. Environmental DNA - eDNA - has shown to be effective at detecting these invasive snakes, and can help to determine range limits for the species, information that is critical for management and control efforts. 

Filter Total Items: 326
In UV light an alga from the desmid family looks like a snowflake chain
February 28, 2017

A snowflake chain? Nope. A one-celled green alga.

The desmid family of single-celled green algae are never found in abundance, says USGS biologist Barry Rosen. They inhabit the soft, slightly acidic water of wetlands that depend on rainwater, like Florida’s Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. They don’t “bloom” en masse, but their presence is an indicator of good water quality. Rosen’s research is

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Schematic showing how sediment on the seafloor moves in response to multiple forces
December 31, 2016

Schematic showing how sediment on the seafloor moves

Schematic showing how sediment on the seafloor moves in response to a force created by the combined action of tides, ocean waves, and wind-driven currents. Sediment movement influences habitat for plants and animals, affects construction of facilities for development for offshore energy, causes suspension of contaminants such as oil that adhere to sediment particles, and

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Frosted flatwoods salamander
December 31, 2016

Frosted flatwoods salamander

Frosted flatwoods salamander in St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, Florida

Frosted flatwoods salamander
December 31, 2016

Frosted flatwoods salamander

Frosted flatwoods salamander, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, Florida

Vertical steel pipe with a horizontal arm extending from the top and tripod legs anchored by cinder blocks at the bottom.
November 30, 2016

Beach-monitoring video camera atop hotel in Madeira Beach, Florida

USGS research oceanographers Jenna Brown and Joe Long installed this video camera atop the Shoreline Island Resort hotel in Madeira Beach, Florida. Starting in February 2017, the camera has recorded video for 17 minutes every hour during daylight hours. Selected images are posted at https://

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two women stand near a poster under a tent talking to the public
October 21, 2016

Discussing corals as climate change recorders at an outreach event

USGS scientists Lauren Toth and Jen Flannery of the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center discuss how they study corals to better understand past climate change. The Center participates in the St. Petersburg Science Festival each year. 

USGS storm-tide sensor
October 5, 2016

USGS storm-tide sensor

This U.S. Geological Survey storm-tide sensor was installed on a pier pylon near Big Talbot Island State Park in Duval County, Florida, in preparation for Hurricane Matthew's arrival. 

Cyanobacterial blooms in 2016 on Lake Okeechobee, Florida
July 9, 2016

Cyanobacterial blooms in 2016 on Lake Okeechobee, Florida

Cyanobacterial blooms, such as the one shown that occurred in 2016 on Lake Okeechobee, Florida, can release toxins.

Newly discovered cavefish species, the Oaxaca Cave Sleeper
June 24, 2016

Oaxaca Cave Sleeper is a newly discovered species

This Oaxaca Cave Sleeper is one of thirteen specimens collected from a cave beneath a reservoir on Mexico's Tonto River. It lacks eyes, is unpigmented, and has sensory adaptations characteristic of fish that live in total darkness. Thuis is the holotype, the example used to describe and name this newly identified species. Credit: Howard L. Jelks and Stephen J. Walsh, USGS

Laboratory specimen of newly-discovered Oaxaca Cave Sleeper
June 24, 2016

A laboratory specimen shows the cavefish's absence of eyes

A laboratory preparation of a Oaxaca Cave Sleeper specimen shows the absence of eyes in this newly identified cavefish species. Credit: Stephen J. Walsh, USGS

Filter Total Items: 244
USGS science for a changing world logo
October 13, 2009

Five giant non-native snake species would pose high risks to the health of ecosystems in the United States should they become established here, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report released today.
The USGS report details the risks of nine non-native boa, anaconda and python species that are invasive or potentially invasive in the United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 1, 2009

Florida's upper Peace River can lose large quantities of water each day to sinkholes. This loss makes the river vulnerable to running dry during periods of low rainfall and limits its ability to support ecosystems and to provide water to residents downstream.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 22, 2009

From steamboats to jetskis, Florida's first streamgage in White Springs has seen it all. When the US Geological Survey (USGS) began first recording water levels and flows on the Suwannee River, this small North Florida town was in the midst of the state's first tourism boom. A report published by USGS this month chronicles a century of change at the state's first streamgage.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 14, 2009

Intersex in smallmouth and largemouth basses is widespread in numerous river basins throughout the United States is the major finding of the most comprehensive and large-scale evaluation of the condition, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research published online in Aquatic Toxicology.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 12, 2009

Pesticide-related compounds and elevated levels of nitrate have been found in lakes in central Florida's Lake Wales Ridge region. The compounds found include currently used pesticides, according to the recently published U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 15, 2009

Record-breaking floodwaters are working their way down Florida's Suwannee River from the Withlacoochee and Alapaha rivers. Crews from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are in the field measuring the height and volume of water that is rushing downstream.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 7, 2009

While the Florida panhandle is under flooding, water levels in the streams and wells of southwest Florida are approaching record low levels for this time of year, putting parts of the state at risk of extreme hydrologic drought in the next few months. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 4, 2009

Florida Site Established for Tracking Seasonal Effects of Climate Change on Native Species
For the first time, a site in Florida has been established where citizens, students and researchers can track the seasonal effects of climate change on Florida's native plants and animals.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 4, 2009

Florida Site Established for Tracking Seasonal Effects of Climate Change on Native Species
For the first time, a site in Florida has been established where citizens, students and researchers can track the seasonal effects of climate change on Florida's native plants and animals.

USGS
December 18, 2008

U.S. Geological Survey Deputy Director Robert Doyle has been selected as a Distinguished recipient of the Presidential Rank Award, a prestigious award that commends outstanding leadership and long-term accomplishments.

USGS
October 6, 2008

 

What: Reporters are invited to attend a special presentation about the impacts of Hurricanes Ike and Gustav on the Texas and Louisiana coast. Compelling before-and-after photographs of the storms will be