Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 177
Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Population Biology and Ecology of Diamondback Terrapins in Mangrove Forested Ecosystems in the Greater Everglades

Long-term capture-recapture research in the Everglades National Park provides baseline information on the Diamondback Terrapin, a species that may be threatened by human disturbances.

Date published: April 5, 2016

Benthic Habitat Characterization and Habitat Use of Endangered Sea Turtles in Marine Protected Areas of the Greater Everglades

USGS assesses how federally endangered sea turtles use the habitat in and around a no-take area in the Dry Tortugas National Park.

Date published: March 30, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluation of Tegu Movements and Habitat Use in Relation to Location and Habitat

Tegus are breeding, they have a diverse diet, and they are established in areas throughout South Florida. USGS is tracking this problematic reptile species to better understand their movements and habitat use to help managers prevent dispersal into new areas.

Date published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

Population Monitoring of the Federally Threatened Okaloosa Darter at Eglin Air Force Base

USGS' and Loyola University New Orleans' innovative research techniques played a role in the decision to downlist the Okaloosa Darter, a freshwater fish endemic to northwest Florida, from Endangered to Threatened.

Contacts: Howard Jelks
Date published: March 17, 2016
Status: Active

Using Environmental DNA for Burmese Python Detection Probabilities and Range-Delimitation in Southern Florida

Current tools for detection of Burmese pythons in South Florida have resulted in low detection rates. Environmental DNA - eDNA - has shown to be effective at detecting these invasive snakes, and can help to determine range limits for the species, information that is critical for management and control efforts. 

Date published: March 16, 2016
Status: Active

Wetland Evaluation and Sediment Elevation Monitoring and Analysis in the Indian River Lagoon

To better understand coastal response to sea-level rise, USGS is monitoring coastal wetland sediment elevations along Florida's east coast.

Contacts: Gordon Anderson
Date published: March 8, 2016

Hurricane Sandy

Over 160 of our scientists, technicians, and specialists responded to Hurricane Sandy by deploying field equipment and capturing information both before and after the storm. Our Sandy Science Plan identifies major research themes that will guide research to continue the support of the recovery activities.

Date published: February 26, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of and Control Strategies for Invasive Burmese Pythons (Python molurus bivitattus) in the Greater Everglades

Telemetry tracking of captured pythons reveals movement patterns of the invasive Burmese python in the Greater Everglades, information that managers can use to prioritize python control efforts.

Date published: February 26, 2016
Status: Active

Spatial Ecology of the American Crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) and American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) in the Greater Everglades

Satellite/GPS tags help USGS researchers understand the movements of American Alligators and American Crocodiles in the Greater Everglades.

Date published: February 25, 2016

Methylmercury Impacts to Reproduction in the Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki)

USGS researchers investigate the effects of methylmercury contamination on reproduction of the Eastern mosquitofish, a common fish in South Florida.

Filter Total Items: 298
Photo of bleaching colonies of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colonies of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides

Bleaching colonies of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides, both green and brown color morphs, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of

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Photo of bleaching colony of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides

Bleaching colony of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when the

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Photo of bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

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Photo of bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

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Photo of bleaching colony of blushing star coral, Stephanocoenia intersepta/michelinii.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of blushing star coral, Stephanocoenia intersepta

Bleaching colony of blushing star coral, Stephanocoenia intersepta/michelinii. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so

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Photo of bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii

Bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so

...
Photo of bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii

Bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so

...
Photo of bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa

Bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

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Photo of bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa

Bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

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Photo of bleaching colony of lobed star coral, Montastraea annularis
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of lobed star coral, Montastraea annularis

Bleaching colony of lobed star coral, Montastraea annularis, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

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Photo of bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa

Bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

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Filter Total Items: 238
USGS science for a changing world logo
April 15, 2009

Record-breaking floodwaters are working their way down Florida's Suwannee River from the Withlacoochee and Alapaha rivers. Crews from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are in the field measuring the height and volume of water that is rushing downstream.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 7, 2009

While the Florida panhandle is under flooding, water levels in the streams and wells of southwest Florida are approaching record low levels for this time of year, putting parts of the state at risk of extreme hydrologic drought in the next few months. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 4, 2009

Florida Site Established for Tracking Seasonal Effects of Climate Change on Native Species
For the first time, a site in Florida has been established where citizens, students and researchers can track the seasonal effects of climate change on Florida's native plants and animals.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 4, 2009

Florida Site Established for Tracking Seasonal Effects of Climate Change on Native Species
For the first time, a site in Florida has been established where citizens, students and researchers can track the seasonal effects of climate change on Florida's native plants and animals.

USGS
December 18, 2008

U.S. Geological Survey Deputy Director Robert Doyle has been selected as a Distinguished recipient of the Presidential Rank Award, a prestigious award that commends outstanding leadership and long-term accomplishments.

USGS
October 6, 2008

 

What: Reporters are invited to attend a special presentation about the impacts of Hurricanes Ike and Gustav on the Texas and Louisiana coast. Compelling before-and-after photographs of the storms will be

USGS
September 12, 2008

Recent research has revealed that beach sand contains high concentrations of E. coli and other fecal indicator bacteria, often greatly exceeding the concentration in beach water.  Further, there is evidence that beach closings due to elevated fecal indicator bacteria may be linked to these sand populations.

USGS
August 28, 2008

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists will be installing rapidly-deployable mobile gages and storm-surge sensors to prepare for Tropical Storm Gustav.

USGS
July 7, 2008

From New Findings on Contaminant Threats in African Dust to the Future of Coral Reefs to Coral Chemical Defenses

USGS
February 20, 2008

Listen online to a Federal News Radio interview with invasive snake specialist and USGS scientist Dr. Gordon Rodda.

USGS
May 10, 2007

The urban bedrock of a low-relief landscape beneath a crowded city seems like an unusual place for a significant fossil discovery. However, four distinct fossil sites found along the walls of canals in metropolitan Miami, Florida, indicate these locations were once a unique marine habitat.