Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 184
Date published: March 30, 2018
Status: Completed

Geophysical Infrastructure Study: Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam

 A study site of the Geophysical Infrastructure Studies: Earthen Dams and Abandoned Mine Lands project.

Contacts: Bethany Burton
Date published: March 30, 2018
Status: Active

The Florida Coastal Mapping Program

The Florida Coastal Mapping Program (FCMaP) is an initiative between Federal and Florida State agencies and institutions to coordinate and facilitate the collection and accessibility of Florida coastal seafloor data in order to fill priority areas and gaps.

Contacts: Xan Fredericks, James Flocks, Chery Hapke, Ph.D., Kim Jackson, James Garey, Ph.D.
Date published: March 20, 2018
Status: Active

Coastal Change

The continued devastation from recent hurricanes and tropical storms demonstrates the vulnerability of coastal communities to coastal-change hazards. Changes in sea level and storm-wave intensity are changing the areas that are prone to erosion and storm-related flooding. The Hazards Vulnerability Team has worked with USGS coastal researchers and partners to improve our understanding of...

Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Measuring Coral Growth to Help Restore Reefs

It is critical to start measuring calcification rates in a systematic way now, particularly at subtropical latitudes where conditions fluctuate seasonally, so that we can understand how dynamic ocean conditions affect calcifying organisms today and predict possible changes in the future. We established a calcification monitoring network in the Florida Keys and have been measuring calcification...

Date published: February 22, 2018
Status: Active

Climate and Environmental Change in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean

This project documents paleoceanographic, climatic, and environmental changes in the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent land areas over the last 10,000 years. The paleoenvironmental data is used to determine rates of change in the past, and to better understand both the natural and anthropogenic factors that contribute to climate variability on inter-annual to millennial timescales.

Date published: February 7, 2018
Status: Active

Relative Sensitivity of Adult Mosquitoes and Butterflies to Adult Mosquito Control Pesticides

Mosquito control on Department of the Interior (DOI) managed lands is a resource management challenge. The pesticides used to control mosquitoes may also affect nontarget organisms whose conservation is one of the primary responsibilities of resource managers.

Date published: January 23, 2018
Status: Active

Scenario-Based Assessments for Coastal Change Hazard Forecasts

A decade of USGS research on storm-driven coastal change hazards has provided the data and modeling capabilities needed to identify areas of our coastline that are likely to experience extreme and potentially hazardous erosion during an extreme storm.

Contacts: Kara Doran
Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

Forecasting Coastal Change

This project focuses on understanding the magnitude and variability of extreme storm impacts on sandy beaches. The overall objective is to improve real-time and scenario-based predictions of coastal change to support management of coastal infrastructure, resources, and safety. 

Contacts: Kara Doran
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An invasive Cuban treefrog in New Orleans, LA.
August 23, 2019

Outstanding in the Field (Ep 4): Amphibian Surveys – Call of the Frog

The USGS Ecosystems Mission Area brings you Outstanding in the Field, a series of stories about our science, our adventures, and our efforts to better understand our fish and wildlife and the ecosystems that support them. In this episode we describe the USGS’s efforts to track frog populations in the southeast United States. 
 

a colorful sunrise over a calm ocean
July 17, 2019

Sunrise in Melbourne, FL

A colorful sunrise appears over the horizon of a calm ocean offshore of Melbourne, Florida. USGS Scientist RC Mickey collects data for location and elevation of sea turtle crawls and associated beach profiles this stretch of coastline. Collected data is used in  a cooperative project with FWC, FWS, USGS, and USFSP aimed at understanding sea turtle nesting behavior in

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Forecasted Gulf Coast beach erosion due to Hurricane Barry
July 12, 2019

Barry's wave, surge likely to affect beaches in four states

This Coastal Change Storm Hazard Team map was created Friday, July 12, 2019 and shows forecast beach erosion (the strip of colored bars closest to the coast), overwash (middle strip) and inundation (outer strip) effects of Tropical Storm Barry’s predicted landfall in Louisiana. See https://marine.

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Baches forecast to be affected by Hurricane Barry
July 12, 2019

Barry's wave, surge likely to affect beaches in four states

This Coastal Change Storm Hazard Team map was created Friday, July 12, 2019 and shows forecast beach erosion (the strip of colored bars closest to the coast), overwash (middle strip) and inundation (outer strip) effects of Tropical Storm Barry’s predicted landfall in Louisiana. See https://marine.

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July 1, 2019

Sea Turtle Underwater POV

See St. Joseph Bay in the Florida Panhandle through the eyes of two young adult female loggerheads as they swim, surface to breathe, dive, forage on underwater grasses and spend time with other sea turtles. Three species of threatened or endangered sea turtles congregate in St. Joseph Bay. They surface only briefly to breathe, and rarely come ashore except when females

Congressman Charlie Crist visits the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
May 6, 2019

Congressman Charlie Crist visits the SPCMSC

On May 6, 2019, Congressman Charlie Crist (13th district, FL) and Operations and Outreach Director Mr. Kendrick Lewis will visit the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC). Congressman Crist requested this visit because he is interested to learn more about the Center and to discuss needs/priorities that we may have. (First row, left to right:

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Photo of the eastern berm of Jim Foot Key. An arrow points to a growing breach in the berm after Hurricane Irma.
April 30, 2019

Breach in Eastern Berm of Jim Foot Key, Florida

In Photo: Eastern berm of Jim Foot Key, April 2019.  This photo taken from Florida Bay, looking in toward the center of the island (now covered in water).  The arrow points toward a breach in the berm, first noted in 2014, but the cut has deepened significantly after Hurricane Irma, and the island interior appears to be permanently tidal.  Loss of the berm structure is

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Interior mudflat on Jim Foot Key covered with saline water. Dead mangrove stumps and underwater grasses can be seen.
April 27, 2019

Interior Mudflat on Jim Foot Key, Florida

In Photo: Interior mudflat on Jim Foot Key covered with saline water, April 2019.  Stumps of dead mangroves (reportedly damaged by Hurricane Donna in 1960 (Craighead, 1962)) are visible projecting from the water.  Shadowed areas below the water are underwater grasses typically found in Florida Bay, now growing inside the island, indicating the mudflat is converting to an 

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Juvenile mangroves on eastern berm of Jim Foot Key. Mangroves are intermingled with saltwort.
April 27, 2019

Juvenile Mangroves on Jim Foot Key, Florida

In Photo: Juvenile mangroves on eastern berm of Jim Foot Key, April 2019.  Mangroves are intermingled with saltwort, the dominant live vegetation on the damaged berms, and standing dead mangroves.  Grid is 25 cm high.  The question is whether these trees will mature fast enough to protect the berm from rising sea level. 

Scientists from the Florence Bascom

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Jessica Rodysill (Reston) and Hunter Wilcox (SPCMSC) deploying a corer in Lake Enriquillo.
April 24, 2019

Researchers deploying a corer in Lake Enriquillo.

Jessica Rodysill (Reston) and Hunter Wilcox (SPCMSC) deploying a corer in Lake Enriquillo. The scientists will use the cores to construct precipitation changes in Dominican Republic over the late Holocene (~5000 years ago to present) time period.

Photo taken as SPMSC scientist Lauren Toth conducts a photographic survey of Porter Patch reef off Key Largo
April 3, 2019

SPMSC scientist Lauren Toth conducts a photographic survey of the reef

SPMSC scientist Lauren Toth conducts a photographic survey of Porter Patch reef off Key Largo, one of the sites that has been surveyed as part of FWRI’s Coral Reef Ecosystem Monitoring project since 1996. The modern reef surveys will be compared to historic surveys to determine how much structural complexity the reefs of the Florida Keys have lost over the past two decades

Image showing mangroves that have lost all their leaves and a berm that is significantly thinner following Hurricane Irma. 
April 2, 2019

Berm at Jim Foot Key, Florida (2019)

In Photo:  Berm of Jim Foot Key about 1.5 years after Hurricane Irma. The red circle indicates the same position as shown in the April 2014 photo. The mature mangrove trees have not recovered from the storm.  

Scientists from the Florence Bascom Geoscience Center

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A SCUBA diver beside a Massive starlet coral on the sea floor at Dry Tortugas National Park
January 25, 2017

Boulder corals in the waters of Dry Tortugas National Park, 70 miles from Key West, contain evidence that confirms a centuries-old sea temperature cycle linked to rains, droughts and hurricanes.

Photo of a young girl drinking water, which likely originated from groundwater sources. 
January 19, 2017

A regional assessment of untreated groundwater in the Coastal Lowlands aquifer system in the southeastern United States is now available from the U.S. Geological Survey.

Photo of a young girl drinking water, which likely originated from groundwater sources. 
January 19, 2017

A regional assessment of untreated groundwater in the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system is now available from the U.S. Geological Survey.

Vilano Beach, Florida before and after Hurricane Matthew
October 31, 2016

New low-altitude aerial photos of Southeastern beaches taken before and after Hurricane Matthew passed offshore show a new storm-cut inlet, and roads, dunes and structures lost.

Hydrologic technician Samantha Kephart.points out a high water mark
October 21, 2016

The heavy rains and storm surge Hurricane Matthew produced caused severe flooding in many parts of the south east, resulting in almost 40 peak flood records. As the flood waters continue to recede from some affected areas, the U. S. Geological Survey will continue its efforts to record this historic flooding. Click here to learn more about the work the USGS has completed for Hurricane Matthew.

Hurricane Matthew satellite image that shows the large storm approaching the coastline of Florida.
October 6, 2016

USGS is engaged in research, monitoring, sampling and coastal change forecasting associated with Hurricane Matthew from Florida north up into Virginia.

To learn about storm sensors and see their location, explore the USGS Coastal Change Hazard Portal, or see satellite imagery before and after the storm, visit the USGS Hurricane Matthew page.

USGS
October 6, 2016

As the east coast prepares for Hurricane Matthew's arrival, the U.S. Geological Survey uses advanced models to forecast the coastal impacts Matthew could bring. 

Storm-tide sensor
October 5, 2016

Media interested in going out with USGS field crews deploying sensors please contact:

Florida: Richard Kane, rkane@usgs.gov, 813-918-1275 

Georgia: Brian McCallum, bemccall@usgs.gov, 678- 924-6672

South Carolina: John Shelton, jmshelto@usgs.gov, 803-767-5542

North Carolina: Jeanne Robbins, jrobbins@usgs.gov, 919-571-4017 

Catawba rhododendron blooming at Round Bald, NC
August 11, 2016

“From the mountains to the coast, the southeastern U.S. contains ecosystems that harbor incredible biodiversity. Many of those ecosystems are already highly at risk from urbanization and other human land-use change. Identifying the ecosystems at risk from climate change will help inform conservation and management to ensure we don’t lose that biodiversity.” (Jennifer Constanza, report author)