Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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June 3, 2011

Gas Pistons Within Drainhole Vent at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō

June 3, 2006, 21:00:05 to June 4, 2006, 01:00:04) This movie sequence is a third example of gas pistoning (described below) captured by the same camera used to compile the other "Gas pistons within the Drainhole 

June 2, 2011

Kīlauea Large Collapse

Movie showing the second of five large collapses within Kīlauea's summit vent on the floor of Halema‘uma‘u. The collapse was captured by a Webcam located on the rim of Halema‘uma‘u directly above the erupting vent.

June 2, 2011

Kīlauea Summit Vent Collapse

Movie showing the fourth of five large collapses within Kīlauea's summit vent on the floor of Halema‘uma‘u. The collapse was captured by a Webcam located on the rim of Halema‘uma‘u directly above the erupting vent.

Vigorous boiling of the lava surface in Kīlauea's summit vent...
June 2, 2011

Vigorous boiling of the lava surface in Kīlauea's summit vent

Photo of vigorous boiling of the lava surface in Kīlauea's summit vent following vent wall and rim collapses earlier in the day. The rim of the vent on the floor of Halema‘uma‘u is about 150 m (yards) across. The lava surface is about 100 m (yards) below the rim.

June 2, 2011

Vent Spattering Up Close

Movie showing spattering from a vent on the east wall of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater.

June 2, 2011

Erupting Vent and Flow (Pu`u `Ō`ō Crater)

A movie of the erupting vent on the east wall of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Crater. The movie begins with a cascade of lava filling the southern opening on the east wall and ends at the spattering source, which is producing the cascading flow.

June 2, 2011

Halema`uma`u Lava Lake Spattering

Quicktime movie showing spattering at the south edge of the lava lake in the vent at Halema‘uma‘u.

June 2, 2011

Lava Lake Spattering

Quicktime movie showing a close-up of spattering at the south edge of the lava lake in the vent at Halema‘uma‘u.

June 2, 2011

Overflight of Halema`uma`u Crater

This Quicktime movie shows a quick video of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during today's overflight. The lava surface has recently been very shallow, as little as 90 meters (98 yards) below the floor of Halema‘uma‘u crater. When the video was taken, the lava was at a high stand during part of a rise and fall cycle, when very little gas is emitted and views are

June 2, 2011

Plume Over Halema`uma`u Crater

Movie showing ashy plume rising above Kīlauea's summit vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater. The plume was the result of the collapse of a portion of the vent wall moments earlier.

June 2, 2011

Halema`uma`u Lava Lake

Movie of the lava lake in Kīlauea's summit vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater minutes after a slice of the vent wall had plunged into the lava. The lava lake is roiling violently as the recently added wall debris is digested by the lava. Slabs of rock can be seen breaking loose from the base of the overhanging vent wall and falling into the lava. The length of time it takes the

May 26, 2011

Time-lapse Sequence from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Crater

This Quicktime movie shows a timelapse sequence taken from a thermal camera on the rim of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater. The movie spans from May 26 to today and shows the rising level of the lava lake in the crater. In the first part of the movie, covering most of June, the level of the lava lake rises primarily due to overflows building the steep levee walls higher. In the last

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USGS
April 1, 2004

If a sinkhole collapses in your back yard, where and how did the stuff disappear? Did an underground opening already exist (such as a lava tube), did something "dissolve" away (such as rotting vegetable matter), or did a kind of conveyer belt remove material and take it somewhere else (such as moving magma)?

USGS
March 25, 2004

March 25 marks the 20th anniversary of the most recent eruption of Mauna Loa. The eruption was preceded by roughly three years of increasing numbers of shallow- and intermediate-depth earthquakes. A marked increase in earthquake activity occurred nearly six months before the eruption.

This is a photo of a bright glow above flow field as seen from end of Chain of Craters Road.
March 22, 2004

Bright glow above flow field as seen from end of Chain of Craters Road

This is a photo of Pu`u `O`o and distant lava flow.
March 21, 2004

Distant lava flow viewed from Pu`u Huluhulu

USGS
March 18, 2004

When we think of the negative impact that volcanoes have on people, the local geographic area of the eruption generally comes to mind. Ash, lava, and mudflows are all destructive and hazardous for people who live close to volcanoes. 

USGS
March 11, 2004

The worst volcanic disaster of the 20th century occurred in 1902 on Martinique, an island in the French West Indies.

USGS
March 4, 2004

About 2.5 km (1.5 miles) down the Hilina Pali Road in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park are two tiny kipuka that help geologists decipher obscure parts of Kīlauea's past 1,500 years.

This is a photo of lava flow erupting from Dave's pit vent.
March 2, 2004

Dave's pit vent active inside Pu`u `O`o