Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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June 2, 2011

Halema`uma`u Lava Lake Spattering

Quicktime movie showing spattering at the south edge of the lava lake in the vent at Halema‘uma‘u.

June 2, 2011

Lava Lake Spattering

Quicktime movie showing a close-up of spattering at the south edge of the lava lake in the vent at Halema‘uma‘u.

June 2, 2011

Overflight of Halema`uma`u Crater

This Quicktime movie shows a quick video of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during today's overflight. The lava surface has recently been very shallow, as little as 90 meters (98 yards) below the floor of Halema‘uma‘u crater. When the video was taken, the lava was at a high stand during part of a rise and fall cycle, when very little gas is emitted and views are

June 2, 2011

Plume Over Halema`uma`u Crater

Movie showing ashy plume rising above Kīlauea's summit vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater. The plume was the result of the collapse of a portion of the vent wall moments earlier.

June 2, 2011

Halema`uma`u Lava Lake

Movie of the lava lake in Kīlauea's summit vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater minutes after a slice of the vent wall had plunged into the lava. The lava lake is roiling violently as the recently added wall debris is digested by the lava. Slabs of rock can be seen breaking loose from the base of the overhanging vent wall and falling into the lava. The length of time it takes the

May 26, 2011

Time-lapse Sequence from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Crater

This Quicktime movie shows a timelapse sequence taken from a thermal camera on the rim of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater. The movie spans from May 26 to today and shows the rising level of the lava lake in the crater. In the first part of the movie, covering most of June, the level of the lava lake rises primarily due to overflows building the steep levee walls higher. In the last

May 25, 2011

Refilling of Pu`u `Ō`ō Crater

This Quicktime movie shows the refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō over the past two months, taken from a thermal camera on the south rim of the crater. Lavadrained from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō on March 5 during the Kamoamoa fissure eruption, and remained absent for several weeks. This thermal camera began recording on March 18, and shows the abrupt return of lava to the crater floor on March 26.

This aerial view of Mauna Loa's summit shows the cinder-cone and la...
May 23, 2011

This Mauna Loa's summit shows the cinder-cone and lava flows that w...

This aerial view of Mauna Loa's summit shows the cinder-cone and lava flows that were erupted in 1949. The crack extending down the left side of the cone is the northeast-southwest trending 1984 fissure that bisected the southwest flank of the cone during the initial phase of the eruption. Light-brown tephra erupted from the 1949 cone thins to the west. The steep caldera

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An aerial view of the 1940 cinder-and-spatter cone on the floor of ...
May 23, 2011

An the 1940 cinder-and-spatter cone on the floor of Mauna Loa's sum...

An aerial view of the 1940 cinder-and-spatter cone on the floor of Mauna Loa's summit caldera as seen from the southeast. The west wall of the caldera (background) is about 170 m (560 feet) high. Most of the caldera floor around the cone is covered by lava flows erupted in 1984.

Spectacular views of Mauna Loa's Southwest and Northeast Rift Zones...
May 23, 2011

Spectacular views of Mauna Loa's Southwest and NorthERZs

View looking up Mauna Loa's spectacular Southwest Rift Zone. Pu‘u o Keokeo fills the lower half of the photo. The black lava beyond is mostly from 1916 and 1926. The summit of Mauna Loa is in the background.

View from just below the summit of Mauna Loa looking back down the ...
May 23, 2011

View from just below the summit of Mauna Loa looking back down the ...

View from just below the summit of Mauna Loa looking back down the Southwest Rift. The Sulfur Cone is the white area just above center frame. Pu‘u o Keokeo is the barely visible bump just above Sulfur Cone at the crest of the Southwest Rift.

View looking downslope at the various cones that dot Mauna Loa's No...
May 23, 2011

View looking downslope at the various cones that dot Mauna Loa's No...

View looking downslope at the various cones that dot Mauna Loa's Northeast Rift Zone. The edge of North Pit, on the north side of Moku‘āweoweo, is in the foreground.

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USGS
January 29, 2004

As reported in the previous Volcano Watch, a new vent opened on the south flank of Pu`u `O`o two weeks ago, on Sunday, January 18. The behavior of the volcano during the previous few months mimicked the behavior that preceded the Mother's Day breakout on May 12, 2002.

USGS
January 22, 2004

If Pu`u `O`o were human, it would make a great baseball pitcher. It throws blazing fastballs, slow change-ups, and sharp curveballs that leave the volcanologist batter fanning at the breeze. But all pitchers have bad days, and Pu`u `O`o had one on January 18, when it tossed a hanging curve that fooled nobody. Here's the story.

This is a photo of a glow from lava and new vent south of cone.
January 18, 2004

New vent at southeast base of Pu`u `O`o.

USGS
January 15, 2004

Since the beginning of the New Year, much attention has been focused on Earth's celestial neighbor, the planet Mars. Though the main goal of the current missions is to find evidence for past Martian life, we volcanologists are also watching developments on Mars with great enthusiasm.

USGS
January 8, 2004

Lava flows stopped pouring into the sea on the south shoreline of Kīlauea 6 months ago. Few imagined that it would mark the beginning of a progressive collapse of the main lava tube system and the slow retreat of lava from the coast back to its source — the Pu`u `O`o cone.

photo of lava
December 31, 2003

A murky New Year's Eve on the upper flow field

USGS
December 31, 2003

Arnold Okamura retired on January 3 after more than 42 years with the U.S. Geological Survey, 39 at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. His tenure at HVO is the longest of any staff member since the observatory was founded in 1912. Arnold had been Deputy Scientist-in-Charge (DSIC) for the past 11.5 years.

photo of lava
December 27, 2003

View of Pu`u `O`o from Pu`u Huluhulu