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Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 5, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 2, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

A plume of volcanic gases (chiefly water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide), tiny lava and rock particles, and droplets drifts southwest in the tradewinds from Halema‘uma‘u Crater. The 500-5,000 metric tons (1.1-11 million pounds) of sulfur dioxide gas emitted each day react in the atmosphere and, with the other gases and particles, form "vog" (volcanic smog)

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U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on th...
May 23, 2008

USGS's HVO perched on the rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera, Hawai‘i

U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on the rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera, Hawai‘i

HVO and Jaggar Museum on Kīlauea Volcano's caldera rim, Hawai‘i...
May 23, 2008

HVO and Jaggar Museum on Kīlauea's caldera rim, Hawai‘i

Close view of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (right, with viewing tower) and National Park Service Jaggar Museum and overlook (left) on Kīlauea Volcano's caldera rim. At least three fault blocks can be seen below the observatory, which developed when Kīlauea's summit collapsed about 500 years ago to form the present-day caldera.

May 23, 2008

Flying high over Halema`uma`u, Waikupanaha bench

Flying at about the elevation of the plume top, this video shows a number of aspects of the ongoing activity at Halema`uma`u Crater. The mostly whitish plume rises to an elevation of about 5,500 feet and blows first to the southwest but apparently spreads to the west over the Ka`u Desert. Mauna Loa rises above the clouds in the background. In addition, the ash deposited

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Gas plume blown by tradewinds across Crater Rim Drive, Kīlauea Volc...
May 23, 2008

Gas plume blown by tradewinds across Crater Rim Drive, Kīlauea

This section of Crater Rim Drive in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was closed in February 2008 because of the high concentration of volcanic gas blowing across the road from Halema‘uma‘u Crater by prevailing trade winds. The concentration of sulfur dioxide gas in this area is considered hazardous to human health.

May 23, 2008

New gas jet at Pu`u `O`o Crater

Closeup of the new vent from a hovering helicopter showing hazy views of incandescence deep inside the vent.

Volcanic-gas plume from Halema‘uma‘u Crater drifts southwest, Kīlau...
May 21, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume from Halema‘uma‘u drifts SW, Kīlauea

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater as seen from the Jaggar Museum (Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park) viewing area next to the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
May 16, 2008

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
May 16, 2008

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rising from summit of Kīlauea Volcano as seen fr...
May 16, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rising from Kīlauea as seen from Highway 12

Volcanic-gas plume rising from summit of Kīlauea Volcano as seen from Highway 11, Hawai‘i

Pre-moonrise, time-lapse view of Halema‘uma‘u Crater from the Hawai...
April 27, 2008

Pre-moonrise, time-lapse view of Halema‘uma‘u from the HVO, Kīlauea...

Strong tradewinds blow the gas plume from the Overlook vent in Halema‘uma‘u Crater to the southwest. Photograph taken at 4:37 a.m. HST.

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USGS
June 10, 1999

If you ask volcanologists what the most dangerous part of their job is, they are likely to answer, "flying in helicopters."

USGS
June 3, 1999

Over the years HVO has attempted to maintain its scientific energy, enthusiasm, and insights by melding a permanent staff with a smaller cadre of rotating, research-oriented scientists. The observatory has about one rotating researcher for every four or five permanent staff. Rotating scientists generally stay 3-5 years.

USGS
May 27, 1999

Lava flows are one of the most common hazards produced by active volcanoes. Here in Hawai`i, they may endanger property but seldom endanger people's lives. 

USGS
May 20, 1999

"Wekiu" is the Hawaiian word for top or summit. This name was given to Mauna Kea's tallest cinder cone, which reaches 13,796 feet in elevation and is the highest in the Hawaiian archipelago. Life on the Mauna Kea summit must endure freezing temperatures, winter snow falls, and, occasionally, hurricane-force winds. 

USGS
May 18, 1999

A small population of the endangered Hawaiian bird, palila, is holding steady on the western slopes of Mauna Kea volcano.

USGS
May 13, 1999

May 18 marks the anniversary of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, which laid waste to over 520 square kilometers (200 square miles) of forest and killed 57 people.

USGS
May 6, 1999

The shaking was finally over. Lower Puna returned to normal following the calamitous episode of ground cracking and subsidence in April 1924. But it was only the calm before the storm.
 

USGS
April 29, 1999

As we enter the month of May, we are remiss in not remembering that April was "Tsunami Awareness Month". April was chosen as "Tsunami Awareness Month" because the deadliest tsunami to strike the Hawaiian Islands occurred on April 1, 1946. What is often overlooked is that the largest and deadliest locally generated tsunami also occurred in the month of April.
 

USGS
April 22, 1999

After an earthquake felt by residents of Hawai`i County, we at the U S Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory are often asked what the earthquake means or indicates in terms of the volcano's behavior. It is beyond our ability to know the detailed implications of a single earthquake event for the complex and inter-related volcanic and tectonic processes that shape our island.

USGS
April 16, 1999

At 2:56 PM local time, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory seismographic network recorded a moderate earthquake from the Ka‘ū district of the Island of Hawai‘i.

USGS
April 15, 1999

Boaters, hikers, pilots, and other outdoor enthusiasts can use hand-held Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to locate themselves or to navigate to a point of known position. Volcanologists routinely use hand-held GPS receivers to map lava flows and other volcanic features. 

USGS
April 8, 1999

An ancient Japanese proverb says that the most recent disaster fades from memory just before the next one strikes. Recently our friend Garret Hew of East Maui Irrigation inquired about the great 1938 Maui earthquake. That's good news; that earthquake hasn't faded from memory yet.