Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Camera captures SO2 released from Kīlauea's summit vent. HVO scient...
June 6, 2013

Camera captures SO2 released from Kīlauea's summit vent. HVO scient...

Camera captures SO2 released from Kīlauea's summit vent. HVO scientist tests the network link between the instrument and the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Risky actions at Kīlauea's ocean entry are cause for concern...
May 16, 2013

Risky actions at Kīlauea's ocean entry are cause for concern

Do not be misguided by the risky actions of this person (upper right), who is standing on an active lava delta that could collapse without warning, amidst a plume of superheated steam, hydrochloric acid, and tiny particles of volcanic glass. To avoid these ocean entry hazards, HVO advises staying at least 400 m (one-quarter mile) from where lava enters the sea. USGS

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Bristle-thighed Curlews on mowed dike in the Ki’i Unit of James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge on Oahu, Hawaii
April 26, 2013

Curlews loafing on the largest mowed dike in the Ki’i Unit

Bristle-thighed Curlews on the largest mowed dike in the Ki’i Unit in James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge on Oahu, Hawaii

April 20, 2013

Spattering Cone Near Pu`u `Ō`ō

This short Quicktime movie shows spattering from a cone near the south rim of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater as a short lava flow is erupted.

Bristle-thighed Curlews on small island in shallow ponds of the Ki’i Unit on Oahu, Hawaii
April 16, 2013

Curlews on small island in shallow ponds of the Ki’i Unit

Bristle-thighed Curlews on small island in shallow ponds of the Ki’i Unit of the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge on Oahu, Hawaii. 

April 8, 2013

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Skylight

Farther down the flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō a skylight on the Kahauale‘a flow provided a view of the flowing lava stream in the lava tube.

Crystals tell us a lot about Kīlauea's ongoing eruption...
April 5, 2013

Crystals tell us a lot about Kīlauea's ongoing eruption

Pele's hair covers much of the ground in the area immediately downwind of the vent at Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Accumulations about a meter (yard) wide are found on the windward sides of the curbs in the Halema‘uma‘u parking lot, which is closed to the public because of the ongoing volcanic hazard (May 3, 2012).

Kīlauea's summit eruption in Halema‘uma‘u is nearly five years old...
March 15, 2013

Kīlauea's summit eruption in Halema‘uma‘u is nearly five years old

An active lava lake is contained within the Overlook crater, within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. The summit eruption began on March 19, 2008, and is now nearly five years old. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Jaggar Museum are visible as a small bump on the horizon in the upper right portion of the image.

Image: Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano Summit Eruption 2013
February 25, 2013

Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano Summit Eruption 2013

Kīlauea Volcano's summit vent within Halema‘uma‘u Crater was more than 500 feet across in March 2013, five years after it opened.

February 18, 2013

A time-lapse summary of the past two years of activity in Halema‘uma‘u

This Quicktime movie shows exactly two years of lava lake activity in Halema‘uma‘u Crater (Feb 11, 2011 to Feb 11, 2013) in one minute of time-lapse video, using images taken from a thermal camera perched on the rim of Halema‘uma‘u. The lake is contained within a vent crater informally called the Overlook crater (because it is directly below the former visitor overlook),

Kīlauea's current eruption is a natural laboratory for volcanologis...
January 11, 2013

Kīlauea's current eruption is a natural laboratory for volcanologists

Tephra falling from a lava fountain on September 6, 1983, helped build the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone, which eventually reached a maximum height of 255 m (835 ft) in 1986.

The Kīlauea Visit that was a Prelude to Revolution...
December 27, 2012

The Kīlauea Visit that was a Prelude to Revolution

"Stevens and Party at Kīlauea" - U.S. Minister Stevens is second from the right. Demosthenes Lycurgus and Alex Lancaster are first and second from the left, respectively.

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USGS
January 15, 2004

Since the beginning of the New Year, much attention has been focused on Earth's celestial neighbor, the planet Mars. Though the main goal of the current missions is to find evidence for past Martian life, we volcanologists are also watching developments on Mars with great enthusiasm.

USGS
January 8, 2004

Lava flows stopped pouring into the sea on the south shoreline of Kīlauea 6 months ago. Few imagined that it would mark the beginning of a progressive collapse of the main lava tube system and the slow retreat of lava from the coast back to its source — the Pu`u `O`o cone.

photo of lava
December 31, 2003

A murky New Year's Eve on the upper flow field

USGS
December 31, 2003

Arnold Okamura retired on January 3 after more than 42 years with the U.S. Geological Survey, 39 at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. His tenure at HVO is the longest of any staff member since the observatory was founded in 1912. Arnold had been Deputy Scientist-in-Charge (DSIC) for the past 11.5 years.

photo of lava
December 27, 2003

View of Pu`u `O`o from Pu`u Huluhulu

photo of lava
December 24, 2003

Christmas Eve from Pu`u `O`o to Cookie Monster

USGS
December 24, 2003

The Volcano Watch of December 19, 2002 detailed an oceanographic cruise studying the 1877 submarine eruption of Mauna Loa in Kealakekua Bay. Only two weeks ago, another group of scientists returned to the bay's calm, azure water to continue the study of the eruption.

USGS
December 18, 2003

Despite its notoriety as Hawai`i's youngest volcano, Lo`ihi remains a submarine mystery for most of us. This is because fieldwork there is limited to manned or remotely operated vehicles. At its shallowest depth, Lo`ihi is still 980 m (3,200 ft) below sea level.

USGS
December 11, 2003

HVO is proud to report that Elliot T. Endo, long-time HVO associate and 1961 graduate of Hilo High School, has been named Scientist-in-Charge of the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) in Vancouver, Washington. Elliot is the son of Kazuo and Yayoi Endo of `Ainako.

USGS
December 4, 2003

Are you still trying to find that special holiday gift for the volcanologist in your life? If so, you've come to the right place. The mini-UV spectrometer is an exciting new tool that is revolutionizing the way we measure the release of gases trapped in magma as it rises up to the surface from deep underground.