Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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June 26, 2003

Lava issues from breached tube

Lava issues from breached tube and quickly disappears over old sea cliff. Note that center of stream stands above margins. See still taken at 0545 today.

June 26, 2003

Lava cascade

Same cascade as in first clip, but viewed more from side to see lava falling down cliff and spreading across surface of lava delta. Similar view to still image taken at 0548 today.

June 26, 2003

Surging cascade on steep cliff face

Surging cascade on steep cliff face. Note that surges override part of cascade next to cliff, which is slowed by friction with the cliff.

June 21, 2003

Lava in channeled breakout

Lava in channeled breakout from nearby tumulus flowing rapidly down steep slope before spreading out on flat ground. Same channel as shown in last two stills for today. Width of channel, about 2 m.

June 7, 2003

Gushing start of lava cascade

Gushing start of cascade shown in image taken at 0553. Lava comes from crusted flow to right. Width of flowing lava, about 1 m.

June 7, 2003

Lava flow

Downstream from first clip about 2 m. Same as shown in image taken at 0554.

June 1, 2003

Two strands of flowing lava come together

Two strands of flowing lava come together to form single cascade on upper part of old sea cliff at Highcastle. Still taken at 0546 shows same scene.

May 29, 2003

Spreading and advancing breakout

Spreading and advancing breakout, the same as that shown in 0545 still image for today. Width of view, about 2 m.

May 29, 2003

Spreading and advancing breakout

Closer view of spreading and advancing breakout shown above. Width of view, about 0.6 m.

May 29, 2003

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe. Still taken today at 0603 is of this breakout. Width of view, about 2.5 m.

May 29, 2003

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe

Continuation and further development of rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe. Still taken today at 0603 is of this breakout. Width of view, about 2.5 m.

May 23, 2003

Two converging toes

Two converging toes, the same as those shown in last two still images for today. Width of view, about 1.5 m.

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USGS
September 5, 2002

Luckily, Hawai`i experiences volcanic ash much less often than it does lava flows. When it comes, though, it can be anything from a nuisance to a disaster for those beneath the falling ash. The most recent ash fall, from Halemaumau in 1924, was minor but affected residents from Maku`u to Pahala. The latest major ash fall, in 1790, resulted from explosions at the summit of Kilauea.

Reginald T. Okamura commorative relief plaque and boquet of flowers
August 29, 2002

"Please do not let this rain dampen your spirits," Senator Daniel Inouye urged the gathering on a misty, breezy Volcano morning.

USGS
August 22, 2002

Big Island residents have long contended with the threat of tsunami. The central Pacific is, unfortunately, ground zero for many of the world's most destructive seismic sea waves.

USGS
August 15, 2002

On May 22, 1960, the largest earthquake ever recorded struck the coast of western Chile. The magnitude of this quake was so great that it literally went off the Richter scale; seismologists estimate the effective magnitude at about 9.5. The amount of fault slip during this quake and the area over which the slip occurred were both staggering.

USGS
August 8, 2002

On May 22, 1960, the largest earthquake ever recorded struck the coast of western Chile. The magnitude of this quake was so great that it literally went off the Richter scale; seismologists estimate the effective magnitude at about 9.5. The amount of fault slip during this quake and the area over which the slip occurred were both staggering.

lava bench, showing lava entries on east side of leading tip of bench.
August 1, 2002

The past two weeks have been exceptional for viewers of Kilauea's lava flows. Both colorful and convenient, the flows have drawn visitors to the island and attracted many residents as well. How did this happen?

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 30, 2002

Lava flows from the Pu`u `O`o vent on the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii are entering the sea and are rapidly adding new land to the coast, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The USGS Web site http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/update/ features near real time lava flow updates as well as photographs.

USGS
July 30, 2002

USGS Web Site Features Daily Lava Flow Updates and Photographs

Lava flows from the Pu`u `O`o vent on the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii are entering the sea and are rapidly adding new land to the coast, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

 Lava cascades down sea cliff and moves across bench
July 25, 2002

"The only constant is change" is an adage that certainly applies to Kīlauea Volcano. Over the past weeks volcano watchers have been treated to views of incandescent lava patches high above the coastal flats, spectacular streams of lava cascading down cliffs, lava-induced forest fires, and surface lava toes, lobes and rivulets edging toward the sea.

USGS
July 18, 2002

In early November 2000, the largest earthquake to strike the Big Island in more than a decade occurred, yet no one, not even seismologists, noticed it. This earthquake was not located a great distance offshore; indeed, part of the fault that slipped lies beneath the Chain of Craters Road where it approaches the currently active lava flow. So why was this quake not felt?

USGS
July 11, 2002

For years, scientists have tried to understand what causes earthquakes. They have recorded, catalogued, and analyzed them.

USGS
July 3, 2002

Hawaiian volcanoes are rich in excitement, beauty, and challenge, but they're not awash in mineral resources. How is it, then, that Kīlauea has a "golden pumice?"