Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,615
View from M3 cam

[M3cam] The Upper Part of Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone

This image is from a research camera positioned on a cone in Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The camera looks northeast (upslope), focusing on the upper part of the Southwest Rift Zone. The upper flank of Mauna Loa forms the skyline.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark

...
Geologic map of Mauna Kea, showing generalized distribution of lava...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea, showing generalized distribution of lava...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea, showing generalized distribution of lava flows, cinder cones, and glacial deposits of the Laupahoehoe Volcanics.

Panorama of Mauna Ulu

[MUcam] - Mauna Ulu Cam

Live Panorama of Mauna Ulu Cam from [MUcam].

Thermal view of JT cam

[JTcam] Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent Thermal HD at Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook

This image is from a temporary thermal camera. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 Celsius (932 Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame. Thick fume, image pixel size and other factors often result in image temperatures being lower than actual surface temperatures. 

...
Fissures in Leilani Estates

[PGcam] - Fissures in Leilani Estates

Live Panorama of Fissures in Leilani Estates from Puʻu Honuaula [PGcam].

Clear day view of PO cam

[POcam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater Single Frame from the North Rim

This image is from a temporary research camera positioned on the north rim of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking into the crater. The current crater is about 250 m (~275 yds) across.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather

...

Changes at Halema`uma`u Over Time

This is a comparison of photos taken from the same location in the Volcano House on May 19 and June 13, 2018. The focal length of the lens for each photo is almost the same. The photos show the enlargement of Halema‘uma‘u laterally and vertically. Note how much lower the rim is relative to the tree in the lower photo.

HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava...

Geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flo...

HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flow field for a documentary about Hawaiian volcanism. Growing lava delta (left background) steaming at the point of ocean entry.

Alaʻili Steaming Activity

[L1cam] - Alaʻili Steaming Activity

Live Panorama of Alaʻili Steaming Activity from Lilewa Crater [L1cam].

Thermal view of PT cam

[PTcam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater Thermal from the North Rim

This image is from a temporary thermal camera positioned on the northwest flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking southeast at Puʻu ʻŌʻō's summit crater. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 degrees (932 degrees Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales automatically based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame. Thick fume, image

...
Filter Total Items: 1,843
USGS
November 1, 1996

William D. Westervelt, in his 1916 book "Hawaiian Legends of Volcanoes", recounted a story about the origin of the two hills called "Na Pu`u a Pele," located on the Ka`u coast, a mile west of where the "road to the sea" reaches the ocean southwest of Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. 

USGS
October 25, 1996

The shape of active volcanoes is constantly changing. Large movements occur during dike intrusions, large earthquakes, or landslides. 

USGS
October 18, 1996

Early last week, C. Barry Raleigh, Dean of the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, announced that the National Science Foundation approved and funded the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) proposal.

USGS
October 11, 1996

While scientists in Hawaii have been investigating the recent activity of Lō‘ihi Volcano beneath 3000 ft of seawater, in Iceland they're watching an eruption that is taking place beneath 2500 ft of glacial ice!
 

USGS
October 4, 1996

USGS geologist Tina Neal reports from HVO's sister observatory in Anchorage (AVO) that Pavlof, the recently awakened volcano at the tip of Alaska Peninsula, is spewing fiery fountains of lava up to 900 feet in the air. 

USGS
September 27, 1996

Scientists from the University of Hawai`i at Manoa are once again engaged in a research cruise over Lo`ihi, the submarine volcano southeast of the Island of Hawai`i. 

USGS
September 20, 1996

The U.S. Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program funds the operations of three volcano observatories in the United States. They are the Hawaiian, Cascades, and Alaska Volcano Observatories, and, as their names imply, each is responsible for monitoring volcanoes in a specific geographic area.
 

Eruption status and shoreline hazards...
September 13, 1996

The current Kīlauea East Rift Zone eruption, which began in January 1983, continues without significant changes. 

USGS
September 6, 1996

The primary mission of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is to evaluate earthquake and volcanic hazards and provide timely information to the various State and County officials responsible for emergency preparedness and response.
 

USGS
August 30, 1996

Lava flows can travel long distances if they develop insulating conduits for transporting fresh molten lava to the flowfront. These conduits are, of course, called lava tubes.

USGS
August 25, 1996

In a double handful of molten magma (weighing about a pound), there is less than a tenth of an ounce, by weight, of dissolved gas—roughly the same weight as a pinch of table salt. Yet this tiny amount of gas can drive spectacular lava fountains hundreds of feet into the air. 

USGS
August 16, 1996

Floating hydrophones and sonobuoys recorded the crackling and grinding noises that are often indicative of an ongoing submarine eruption, but the University of Hawaii Pisces V dive team and their USGS, Bishop Museum, and University of Washington collaborators found no red lava or active eruptive vents as they explored the underwater world of Lo`ihi volcano last week.