Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,667
Explosion at Halemaumau as seen from Uēkahuna Bluff, at Kīlauea Vol...
May 13, 1924

Explosion at Halema‘uma‘u as seen from Uēkahuna Bluff, at Kīlauea, ...

Eight persons, including newspaper and movie men observing the scene at Halema‘uma‘u, were caught in a rain of hot rocks from this explosion. The rocks emitted hissing sounds as hot gas, mainly steam, escaped from them. Park superintendent Thomas Boles was knocked down twice by this bombardment.

Observer examines boulder ejected from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea Volca...
May 11, 1924

Boulder ejected from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea, May 11, 1925

On May 11, Ruy Finch and W.O. Clark visited Halemaumau and found a rock fragment weighing about 180 kg (400 pounds) that had been thrown 60 meters (200 feet) from the rim of the crater.

One of the first explosion clouds from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea Volca...
May 10, 1924

First explosion clouds from Halemaumau, Kīlauea 1925

Later scientists at the Observatory listed May 10 as the first day of the eruptive series. Between this date and May 27, they carefully recorded all explosions, ballistic falls, electric storms, and muddy rains as well as earthquakes felt and recorded on seismographs.

Scientists looking into the bright glow of Mauna Loa's 1942 eruptiv...
April 28, 1924

Scientists looking into bright glow of Mauna Loa's 1942 eruptive ve...

Scientists looking into the bright glow of Mauna Loa's 1942 eruptive vent. Eruption occurred during WWII and was not publicized to prevent Japanese war planes from navigating to the island at night.

Gas Plume during the 1984 eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii blocks out ...

Gas Plume during the 1984 eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

Gas Plume during the 1984 eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii blocks out the sun.

[M1cam] Mauna Loa's Northeast Rift Zone from HVO Observation Tower

This image is from a research camera positioned in the observation tower at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The camera looks northwest toward the summit and Northeast Rift Zone of Mauna Loa.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal

...
Views of Mauna Loa Volcano during clear weather day (left) and on d...

Views of Mauna Loa Volcano during clear weather day and on day when...

These views of Mauna Loa are from near the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory looking toward the west. The view on left is typical during strong trade winds that blow the plume from Halema‘uma‘u Crater southwest of the summit area. The view on right is common during slack winds that allow vog conditions to develop in the summit area of Kīlauea. During such conditions, people

...

[KWcam] - Halemaʻumaʻu, water lake, and down-dropped block

Live Panorama of Halemaʻumaʻu, water lake, and down-dropped caldera floor from the west rim of the new summit collapse features [KWcam]. 

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better

...
Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of ...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of ...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of Hamakua Volcanics. Laupahoehoe Volcanics are inferred to overlie a vast area of Hamakua Volcanics on the upper flanks and summit.

View from m2 cam

[M2cam] The Middle Part of Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone

This image is from a research camera positioned on a cone in Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The camera looks northeast (upslope), focusing on the middle part of the Southwest Rift Zone. The volcano's summit is at upper right.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of

...
Filter Total Items: 2,078
USGS
October 19, 2000

Driving along the Queen Ka`ahumanu highway from Kailua-Kona to Waikoloa, one passes a vast expanse of well-exposed lava rock. These flows are from Hualālai and Mauna Loa Volcanoes and are of various ages. If you slow down and look carefully, you are able to recognize individual flows by their distinctive surface texture, color, or luster.
 

USGS
October 12, 2000

Sweeping vistas into Haleakalā Crater are seen in the final stretch of road at Haleakalā National Park, from the summit visitor center to the top of Red Hill. Some observers, however, focus their attention on the pavement, which is prominently cracked perpendicular to travel direction. 

USGS
October 5, 2000

Earthquakes occur every day on the Island of Hawai`i. Most are small, less than magnitude 3, but typically a couple are felt by someone each week. Damaging earthquakes occur every few years, and very large ones take place every few decades or more often.

USGS
September 28, 2000

Lava flows and volcanic eruptions played a major role in the Earth's history since it was formed some four billion years ago. We can look at rocks that are almost that age and see structures and crystals similar to those that form today.
 

USGS
September 21, 2000

Cats have been our pets and rat-catchers since the dawn of civilization. Many of us grew up with cats or now keep them (including the authors of this column!).

USGS
September 14, 2000

Those of you who pay attention to the goings-on of the volcano are well aware that the quality of lava viewing is highly uneven. Some days you can hike for sweltering hours over recently active flows without seeing any red lava. 

USGS
September 7, 2000

Sometimes in science you find something that theory says you shouldn't. Then your pulse starts racing. Are your observations or calculations wrong? Is the theory wrong? Or is there a middle ground, in which observations can be fit to theory if both are tweaked a little?
 

USGS
August 31, 2000

What do Kīlauea Volcano's eruption and Hilo's 7:30 a.m. traffic have in common? For one thing, lots of stops and starts. The stops and starts in the eruption at Kīlauea are the by now familiar pauses; the stops and starts in busy Hilo traffic might be referred to in more colorful terms.
 

USGS
August 24, 2000

The past two weeks have seen changes in Kīlauea's eruption. The changes aren't fundamental, but they do impact the viewing public. The ocean entry has stopped, surface flows no longer can be seen on the coastal flat, and a bright glow sometimes highlights the sky above Pulama pali.
 

USGS
August 17, 2000

Late last week geophysicist Michael Lisowski and his family left Hilo for Vancouver, Washington, and the Cascades Volcano Observatory. 

USGS
August 10, 2000

The weekly newspaper series "Volcano Watch" has been published continuously since November 1991. Its articles keep Big Island residents informed about Kīlauea Volcano's ongoing eruption. 

USGS
August 3, 2000

How much magma enters Kīlauea every day? How much is erupted to the surface? How much stays underground?