Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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July 2007 Eruption—Flow Field Map...
February 4, 2011

Map showing the extent of the "July 2007 eruption", or Episode 58, flow field relative to surrounding communities.

Halema‘uma‘u Vent Map...
February 1, 2010

Map showing the location of the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook vent, and subsequent closures due to the eruption.

Aerial view of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and vicinity...
November 1, 2009

Aerial view of Puʻu ʻŌʻō and surrounding features. 

Episode 56 Map (with Seismicity)...
June 20, 2007

Map shows activity from Episode 56.

Map of flows from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō: September 12, 2003...
September 12, 2003

Map shows lava flows erupted during 1983-present activity of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and Kupaianaha. Red colors, both dark and light, denote Mother's Day flow, which began erupting on May 12, 2002 and continues to the present. The darkest color represents flows active since January 21, 2003.

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone and surroundings as of July 2000...
July 1, 2000

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone and surroundings as of July 2000, showing the area covered (mauve color) by lava since February 1997 during episode 55. Inside the crater of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, the "trough" is the drained lava pond of September–October 1999. The central portion of the trough was briefly filled with lava in February 2000.

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone and surroundings as of March 2000...
March 1, 2000

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone and surroundings as of March 2000 showing the area covered (dark gray) by lava since February 1997 during episode 55. Inside the crater of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, the "trough" is the drained lava pond of September–October 1999.

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Color photograph of instrument monitoring lava lake
December 26, 2020

New Instrument Measures Lava Lake with Laser

Continuous Laser Rangefinder gauge on crater rim measuring Halema’uma’u lava lake, Kīlauea summit, 12/26/2020.  Exploded drawing of instrument optical enclosure upper right.  USGS photo and drawing by F. Younger. 

Color photograph of lava lake
December 26, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption - Dec. 26, 2020 at 5:15 a.m. HST

The eruption continues in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea's summit. HVO field crews observing the activity overnight noted that at approximately 2:40 a.m. HST December 26, 2020, activity at west vent in the wall of Halema‘uma‘u rejuvenated: the west vent has became more active than the northern vent. Since the start of the eruption on December 20 at 9:30 p.m. HST, the

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Color photograph of vent
December 26, 2020

Kīlauea summit west vent - Dec. 26, 2020 at 5:15 a.m. HST

As of about 2:40 a.m. HST on December 26, 2020, activity at the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater wall at Kīlauea's summit has increased. This photo, taken at approximately 5:15 a.m. HST shows fountaining at the west vent, and lava pouring from the north end of the fissure into the growing lava lake. HVO field crews monitoring the activity overnight measured the west vent

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December 26, 2020

Overflight of Kīlauea's summit Lava Lake and Fissure

A helicopter overflight on December 26, 2020, provided aerial views of the eruption in Halema‘uma‘u. This video, which is sped up 3 times, shows the lava lake and active west vent that rejuvenated just before 3 a.m. HST today. Visual and thermal imagery collected during the overflight are used to map the ongoing activity.

December 25, 2020

Kīlauea — UAS Video of Halema‘uma‘u Crater Eruption (Dec. 25, 2020)

Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) video clips of the eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit. This collection of video clips from December 25, 2020 taken with UAS shows the then-dominant north vent fountain and occasional weak spattering from the west vent. The lava lake during the time of the video was measured at approximately 178 m (584 ft) deep

Color photograph of lava lake at night
December 25, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption - Dec. 25, 2020 at 2:30 a.m.

An early December 25, 2020, morning view of the ongoing eruption in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea's summit. Overnight fountaining continued to feed the rising lava lake, which slowly fills Halema‘uma‘u. This photo, taken at approximately 2:30 a.m. from the south rim of the crater, shows the main northern vent that is being drowned by the rising lava lake. Intermittent

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Color photograph of scientist monitoring lava lake
December 25, 2020

Kīlauea's summit lava lake - Dec. 25, 2020 at 7:30 a.m. HST

HVO field crews measured Kīlauea's summit lava lake this morning (Dec. 25) around 7:30 a.m. HST. The lake surface is now 445 m (1460 ft) below the crater rim observation site, indicating that the lake has filled 176 m (577 ft) of the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u crater. The lake rose approximately 6 m (20 ft) over the past 24 hours. Fountaining continues at two locations, more

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Color map showing lava lake thickness
December 25, 2020

December 25, 2020, preliminary map of the lava lake depth at 2:15 p.m.

Lava lake level measurements collected during a field visit of Kīlauea Volcano's summit around 2:15 p.m. HST on December 25, 2020, were used to create a preliminary lava lake depth map. When compared to pre-eruption topographic models, it shows that the bottom of Halema'uma'u crater has been filled by almost 176 m (578 ft) of lava. Map by H. Dietterich.

Color photograph of lava lake
December 25, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption - Dec. 25, 2020 at 6 p.m. HST

On the evening of December 25, 2020, the eruption in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea's summit continued. Throughout the day, fountaining at two vents continued to feed the rising lava lake which slowly fills Halema‘uma‘u. This photo, taken at approximately 6 p.m. HST from the south rim of the crater shows the main northern vent that is being drowned by the rising lava lake

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Color photograph of lava lake
December 24, 2020

KW webcam image taken on December 24, 2020, around 6:30 a.m. HST

Kīlauea summit KW webam image taken on December 24, 2020, just after 6:30 a.m. HST. The water lake has been replaced by a lava lake; fissures in the wall of Halemaʻumaʻu feed a lava lake that continues to fill the crater. You can view live KW webcam images here

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Color graphic showing lava lake depth relative to empire state building
December 24, 2020

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake depth compared to Empire State Building

Beginning on December 20, 2020, fissure vents opened in the Halema‘uma‘u crater. The former water lake quickly boiled away and, fed by two active fissures, the new lava lake is rising. How high is the lava in the approximately 54 acre lake? If the Empire State Building, in New York City, was placed at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u crater, we estimate the lava lake level could

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December 24, 2020

Halema'uma'u — Switch from Water Lake to Lava Lake (Thermal)

This thermal timelapse (from F1cam webcam) shows the switch from water lake to lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, spanning December 20 to December 24. During the initial phase of lava appearing in the crater, a large steam plume is generated as lava interacts with and boils off the water lake. The temperature scale in this initial phase is saturated, but the camera settings were

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Before and after views of a water fall.  First shows light flow of water over the falls, the second shows heavy flow.
August 24, 2018

Editor’s note: This article will be updated online with more information on the USGS response to Hurricane Lane as it becomes available.

50,000 tons of sulfur dioxide gas per day
August 23, 2018

Many Island of Hawai‘i residents are familiar with the volcanic air pollution known as "vog." The main culprit in the formation of vog is sulfur dioxide gas (SO2) released from Kīlauea's eruptions (see vog.ivhhn.org/what-vog for more information).

Nighttime scene from shipboard of lava entering the Pacific Ocean
August 16, 2018

The visible part of Kīlauea from the summit to the Lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) makes up only a small portion of the total volcano. Much of Kīlauea lies beneath the sea, including the Puna ridge to the east, and the south flank extending offshore beyond the southern coastline.

visibly active lava on Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone
August 9, 2018

Since the morning of August 4, 2018, activity at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and its lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) has diminished dramatically—and the slowdown continues.

active lava channel on Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone
August 2, 2018

"How long will it last?" is one of the most challenging questions asked about a volcanic eruption, including Kīlauea Volcano's current lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) eruption.

Changes at Halemaumau over time...
July 31, 2018

We've compiled some Frequently Asked Questions that address the reasons behind the current activity summit activity and what might happen over the next several months.