Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 15, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 15, 2018

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 14, 2018

Map as of 11:00 a.m. HST, June 14, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 14, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Thursday June 14

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 13, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 13, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 12, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:30 pm on Tuesday, June 5

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 11, 2018

Map as of 3:00 p.m. HST, June 11, 2018

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 10, 2018

Map as of 12:00 p.m. (noon) HST, June 10, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 10, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6:45 am on Sunday, June 10

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 9, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 5:30 pm on Saturday, June 9

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 9, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 9, 2018

Thermal map of Fissure 8 lava flow at coast
June 8, 2018

This thermal map shows the Fissure 8 lava flow along the coast, as of 12:30 pm on Friday, June 8

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 8, 2018

Map as of 12:00 p.m. (noon) HST, June 8, 2018

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April 16, 2021

Kīlauea Summit Overflight (April 16, 2021)

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists conducted a routine helicopter overflight of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Active surface lava remains limited to a small area in the western portion of the lake, with the eastern portion solidified at the surface.

April 16, 2021

Kīlauea Lava Lake (April 16, 2021)

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists visited the east rim of Halema‘uma‘u Crater to make observations of Kīlauea's summit lava lake and survey the eastern portion of the crater. This video compilation shows different aspects of the lake activity in the western portion of the crater. 

A close-up view of the western fissure within Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano
April 14, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruptive activity — April 14, 2021

A close-up view of the western fissure within Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Island of Hawai‘i. Lava continues to enter the lava lake from a wide inlet near the base of the western vent (fuming at center right). Crustal foundering is common on the active lava lake surface (center bottom), located on the western side of the crater. This photograph was taken

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April 13, 2021

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u Lava Lake Inlet (April 13, 2021)

This video shows the inlet along the western margin of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava stream was moving slowly but steadily, and was emerging beneath a portion of crust attached to the lake margin. The video is shown at 10x speed.
 

April 13, 2021

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u gas plume (April 13, 2021)

KPcam webcam on the flank of Mauna Loa looks south towards the summit of Kīlauea to monitor the gas plume from the active lava lake. This time-lapse video shows a typical day for the summit plume. Clear views in the night and morning show the low, ground-hugging plume carried to the southwest by the tradewinds. The plume is blocked from view by afternoon rain clouds. In

View from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u shows the perched lava lake
April 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—April 13, 2021

This view from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u shows the perched lava lake, supplied by lava from the western fissure (upper right portion of photo). The levee surrounding the active lava lake is up to about 5 m (16 ft) high. USGS photo by M. Patrick on April 13, 2021.

A close up view of the inlet at the western margin of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater
April 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—April 13, 2021

A close up view of the inlet at the western margin of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava stream was covered in a thin, flexible crust and was moving at a very slow velocity. USGS photo taken by M. Patrick on April 13, 2021.

Lava continues to erupt from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit
April 9, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruptive activity on April 9, 2021

Lava continues to erupt from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. This photo of the vent and active western portion of the lava lake was taken around 3:00 p.m. HST from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater. USGS photo taken by K. Lynn on April 9, 2021.

Lava erupting from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater emerged from a second source closer to the vents base
April 9, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruptive activity on April 9, 2021

On Friday, lava erupting from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater emerged from a source closer to the vents base (center), a few feet away from the submerged effusive inlet that has been feeding the lava lake for several weeks (lower right). This photo was taken from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, in an area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to

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On Friday afternoon, April 9, lava entered the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake from two sources near the base of the west vent
April 9, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruptive activity on April 9, 2021

On Friday afternoon, April 9, lava entered the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake from two sources near the base of the west vent (degassing on left side of the image). This photo was taken around 4:00 p.m. HST from the western rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit. The lava source closer to the west vent emerged approximately one hour before this photo was taken. USGS Photo

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Color photograph of lava lake and crater wall
April 8, 2021

April 8, 2021 — Kīlauea

The crusted-over southern shoreline of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit has accumulated talus (rubble) blocks on the surface since it solidified in February. On April 8, 2021, HVO field geologists noted steaming east of the talus (above the rubble in the photo) that was producing hazy viewing conditions. USGS photo by C. Parcheta.

View of the Kīlauea summit lava lake from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater on April 7, 2021
April 7, 2021

Kīlauea summit lava lake on April 7, 2021

View of the Kīlauea summit lava lake from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater on April 7, 2021. Lava continues to erupt from the west vent, where a diffuse gas plume is visible in the lower left. The active west part of the lava lake (lower center) is a lighter gray color, compared to the darker appearance of the solidified surface crust to the east. This photo was taken

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Color photograph of lava lake and vent
March 11, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color map of lava flow response times
March 11, 2021

Mauna Loa has been in the news lately, as the volcano continues to awaken from its slumber. While an eruption of Mauna Loa is not imminent, now is the time to revisit personal eruption plans.  Similar to preparing for hurricane season, having an eruption plan in advance helps during an emergency.

USGS science for a changing world
March 10, 2021

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-4.2 earthquake located beneath Mauna Loa's southeast flank on Wednesday, March 10, at 2:21 p.m., HST.  

Color animated gif of lava lake rise
March 9, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

A zoomed-in view near the base of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater, Kīlauea summit
March 8, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Subtle steaming was visible at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō during HVO's overflight of Kīlauea on March 4, 2021
March 5, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Maps of seismic events leading up to the 2020 Eruption of Kīlauea Volcano
March 4, 2021

Pele returned to the summit of Kīlauea on the evening of December 20, 2020. Incredible video documents the start of the new eruption in Halema‘uma‘u and the dynamic ongoing activity. There was no significant change that suggested lava would erupt again so rapidly, but there were subtle signs of restless behavior around Kīlauea’s summit in the months prior to the eruption.   

View of the Kīlauea summit lava lake taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u
March 4, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Close-up view of the western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u, showing the incandescent lava upwelling at the inlet
March 3, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of lava lake and rainbow
March 1, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Map of post-1823 lava flows erupted from Mauna Loa (gray) and numbe...
February 25, 2021

“When will Mauna Loa erupt next?” This was the title of a Volcano Awareness Month video presentation released by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) in January 2021. This was also the topic of discussion among HVO scientists last week following the detection of slight changes in ground deformation and seismicity at the summit of Mauna Loa. 

color photograph of lava flow
February 25, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.