Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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September 8, 2007

Long-term evolution of the Episode 58 lava channel

(September 8 to November 30, 2007) Within days of the onset of Episode 58 on July 21, 2008, activity localized on the easternmost eruptive fissure—Fissure D—and channelized lava began flowing to the northeast. Repeated overflows from the channel added slowly to its height, and the channel became perched up to 45 meters above the pre-existing lava surface. The images that

September 2, 2007

Aerial of eddy in channel near vent D

Aerial of eddy in channel near vent D

August 8, 2007

Looking down the channel of Fissure D

Looking down the channel of Fissure D

July 25, 2007

Collapse and refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater

(June 10 to July 25, 2007) During June 17–19, 2007, an intrusion into Kīlauea's upper east rift zone (Episode 56) led to the cessation of eruptive activity at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and the collapse of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater floor (Poland and others, 2008). The quiet did not last long, though, and lava began to erupt on the floor of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater in early July (Episode 57). After

July 13, 2007

Refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater

(July 13, 2007, 14:00:30 to 21:00:36) Episode 57 was driven by the eruption of lava from two vents—one on the west-central part of the crater floor and the other on the eastern side of the crater. This movie shows lava erupting from the eastern of the two vents. Lava can be seen occasionally overtopping levees that formed along the edges of the lava lake. The images that

July 8, 2007

Refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater

The refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō during Episode 57 was driven by the eruption of lava from two vents—one on the west-central part of the crater floor (to the right) and the other on the eastern side of the crater (to the left). This movie shows the competing interaction between flows from these two vents for a period of several hours on July 8. The images that make up this movie

July 6, 2007

Lava lake draining event during Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō refilling

(July 5, 2007, 23:00:06 to July 6, 2007, 09:00:06) With the resumption of eruptive activity at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō on July 1, 2007 (Episode 57), a lava lake, fed by two vents, quickly began to form within the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater. The vent seen here was located on the eastern side of the crater. The other vent, out of sight to the left, was located on the west-central part of the crater

Image: Hawaiian Monk Seal (Monachus schauinslandi)
June 9, 2007

Hawaiian Monk Seal (Monachus schauinslandi)

Hawaiian Monk Seal on a sandy beach near the western tip of the Hawaiian island of Moloka´i.

Image: Sunrise on a Hawaiian Beach 2
June 9, 2007

Sunrise on a Hawaiian Beach 2

Just after sunrise on a beach in eastern Maui.

Image: Sunrise on a Hawaiian Beach 1
June 9, 2007

Sunrise on a Hawaiian Beach 1

Just after sunrise on a beach in eastern Maui.

Image: Sunrise on a Hawaiian Beach 2
June 9, 2007

Sunrise on a Hawaiian Beach 2

Just after sunrise on a beach in eastern Maui.

October 28, 2006

Long-term Change at MLK Vent

(April 2, 2004, to October 28, 2006) A time-lapse camera was poised on the southwestern flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone from early 2004 through mid-2007. This location overlooked the "Martin Luther King" (MLK) vent, in the foreground (~70 m away), and provided a distant view of the top of the "Prince Kūhiō Kalaniana‘ole" (PKK) tube system—the Episode 55 lava tube system that

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USGS
February 6, 2003

Little more than a mile down the Chain of Craters Road from Crater Rim Drive, a large tract of bare ground suddenly appears on the right, and curious travelers wonder why it is so open. But there's no place to stop, so they move on, and the Puhimau thermal area is quickly forgotten.

USGS
January 30, 2003

For more than twenty years, Kīlauea has been erupting almost continuously. In the early years, the eruption alternated between dramatic fountains and periods of repose. For the last 16 years, however, Kīlauea has settled into a stable routine-lava quietly flows out of flank vents on Pu`u `O`o cone into lava tubes, which wind sinuously toward the ocean.

USGS
January 23, 2003

The inflation of Mauna Loa Volcano that started last year appears to be slowing down. From May 2002 until very recently, continuously recording instruments spanning Moku`aweoweo, Mauna Loa's caldera, showed that the summit area was extending and rising, indicating that magma was pressurizing a reservoir beneath the surface.

View of Cookie Monster breakout site
January 22, 2003

New breakouts high on Mother's Day tube

Drawing depicts Pu`u `O`o with a lava fountain, whose flow went underground through a lava tube, then poured into the ocean
January 16, 2003

On January 4, as lava flowed from the Pu`u `O`o cone 11 km (7 miles) to the south shoreline of Kilauea Volcano, the staff of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory welcomed the public to our Open House in the Park, celebrating the twentieth anniversary of the eruption.