Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Two talks about Kīlauea Volcano at UH-Hilo...
January 8, 2014

Two talks about Kīlauea at UH-Hilo

During the first few hours of the Kamoamoa fissure eruption in March 2011, lava bubbled to the surface through a ground crack that propagated along Kīlauea Volcano's East Rift Zone. How it and other Hawaiian fissure eruptions work will be the topic of a talk at UH-Hilo on January 16, 2014.

It was remarkably clear during today's overflight of Kīlauea's east...
November 27, 2013

It was remarkably clear during today's overflight of Kīlauea's ERZ....

It was remarkably clear during today's overflight of Kīlauea's east rift zone. This photo is taken from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, and looks northwest. Mauna Kea is at the right, and Mauna Loa is at the left. In front of the summit of Mauna Loa, the degassing plume from the lava lake at Kīlauea's summit is rising vertically.

October 24, 2013

Thermal image sequence of summit lava lake motion

This thermal image sequence shows the typical motion of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater. For scale, the lake is about 160 meters (520 feet) wide in this view. The clip spans about 12 minutes, and is shown at 30x speed. The lava upwells along the north margin of the lava lake (in this view, near the top of the image). The crust slowly migrates towards the south, where

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Jaggar Museum, Kīlauea Volcano, Ha...
August 27, 2013

HVO and Jaggar Museum, Kīlauea, HI

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) and Jaggar Museum are located at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, and are visible atop the cliff to the right, on the edge of Kīlauea Caldera. HVO is about 2 km (1.25 miles) north-northwest of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, fuming (but not directly visible) at the left edge of the photo.

Small explosion at Halema`uma`u lava lake (Kīlauea, Hawaii)....
August 23, 2013

Small explosion at Halema`uma`u lava lake (Kīlauea, Hawaii).

At 9:48 PM on Friday, August 23, 2013, a collapse of a piece of the wall above the lava lake in Halema`uma`u triggered a small explosion. The explosion bombarded the rim of Halema`uma`u around the old visitor overlook with molten gobs of spatter as big as dinner plates. Dense lithic fragments from the collapsed wall, and at least as large as a baseball, were also thrown

...
Lava enters ocean at Kupapa‘u Point, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i. Phot...
August 7, 2013

Lava enters ocean at Kupapa‘u Point, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i. Photographed...

Lava enters ocean at Kupapa‘u Point, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i. Photographed with a telephoto lens, the safest way to view the interaction of lava and seawater on the edge of an active delta.

Mowed grasses interspersed with low shrubs in coastal dunes of the Ki’i Unit, in
July 17, 2013

Mowed grasses in coastal dunes of the Ki’i Unit on Oahu, Hawaii

Mowed grasses interspersed with low shrubs in coastal dunes of the Ki’i Unit in James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge on Oahu, Hawaii

Ephemeral wet meadow surrounded by mowed vegetation in the Punamano Unit
July 16, 2013

Ephemeral wet meadow in the Punamano Unit on Oahu, Hawaii

Ephemeral wet meadow surrounded by mowed vegetation in the Punamano Unit of the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge on Oahu, Hawaii

lava flow expanding into trees
June 27, 2013

Kahauale‘a 2 flow remains active north of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō

The Kahauale‘a 2 flow remains active north of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, and has expanded a very minor amount into the forest, burning trees. The flow, which consists of slowly moving pāhoehoe, has widened but advanced little over the past two weeks.

Lava flow from Kīlauea Volcano (Hawaii) enters forest....
June 27, 2013

Lava flow from Kīlauea (Hawaii) enters forest.

On Kīlauea's East Rift Zone, the Kahauale'a 2 flow advances slowly into the Puna Forest Reserve. The Kahauale`a 2 flow began in early May, 2013, on the north side of the rift.

Color photograph showing person and instrument measuring volcanic gas
June 6, 2013

SO2 camera being tested by HVO scientist

Camera captures SO2 released from Kīlauea's summit vent. HVO scientist tests the network link between the instrument and the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Camera captures SO2 released from Kīlauea's summit vent. HVO scient...
June 6, 2013

Camera captures SO2 released from Kīlauea's summit vent. HVO scient...

Camera captures SO2 released from Kīlauea's summit vent. HVO scientist tests the network link between the instrument and the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

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photo of lava
December 24, 2003

Christmas Eve from Pu`u `O`o to Cookie Monster

USGS
December 24, 2003

The Volcano Watch of December 19, 2002 detailed an oceanographic cruise studying the 1877 submarine eruption of Mauna Loa in Kealakekua Bay. Only two weeks ago, another group of scientists returned to the bay's calm, azure water to continue the study of the eruption.

USGS
December 18, 2003

Despite its notoriety as Hawai`i's youngest volcano, Lo`ihi remains a submarine mystery for most of us. This is because fieldwork there is limited to manned or remotely operated vehicles. At its shallowest depth, Lo`ihi is still 980 m (3,200 ft) below sea level.

USGS
December 11, 2003

HVO is proud to report that Elliot T. Endo, long-time HVO associate and 1961 graduate of Hilo High School, has been named Scientist-in-Charge of the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) in Vancouver, Washington. Elliot is the son of Kazuo and Yayoi Endo of `Ainako.

USGS
December 4, 2003

Are you still trying to find that special holiday gift for the volcanologist in your life? If so, you've come to the right place. The mini-UV spectrometer is an exciting new tool that is revolutionizing the way we measure the release of gases trapped in magma as it rises up to the surface from deep underground.

USGS
November 26, 2003

A stunning colored map of Hawai`i, stretching from Ni`ihau to the Big Island, has just been published. This map is different from most others, because it shows the topography of the sea floor as well as of the islands. It measures 63.5 by 96.5 cm (25 by 28 inches) and is printed on heavy poster paper, suitable for hanging and display.

photo of lava
November 21, 2003

Pu`u `O`o and upper Mother's Day tube

USGS
November 20, 2003

Every November, we usually include a column on earthquakes in Hawaii to remind residents and to inform newcomers of the high seismic hazard on the island. November is chosen because the two largest earthquakes in the past 50 years occurred in this month.

USGS
November 13, 2003

Energy from the sun supports most life on our planet, but far below the sea surface, another, less obvious energy source pumps heat and life-giving energy into the earth's biosphere. As a result, life persists independent of the sun's energy in some special seafloor environments.