Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii...
September 3, 2008

USGS HVO, Kīlauea, Hawaii

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on the west rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera, overlooks Halema‘uma‘u Crater, where a new vent that opened in March 2008 emits a volcanic gas plume.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit cal...
September 3, 2008

HVO on rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera overlooking Halema‘uma‘u, Ha...

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the first volcano observatory in the United States, is located on the west rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. A volcanic gas plume rises from a vent that opened in 2008 at the base of the south wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Crater Rim Drive in foreground. The observatory is

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Image: The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption
September 3, 2008

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i—the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008.

September 2, 2008

Nightshot movie showing the explosive eruption

Movie, in 'nightshot' mode and zoomed in on the Halema`uma`u vent, shows the explosive eruption which occurred at 8:13 pm. This eruption carpeted the area around the Halema`uma`u crater rim with ejecta as large as 8 inches long.

August 31, 2008

Pulse of ash and flashes of incandescence

Video shows an ash-emission event at 6:53pm on August 31 from the vent in Halema`uma`u crater. The event begins with a robust pulse of ash, followed shortly by flashes of bright incandescence that rise about 50 yards above the vent.

August 27, 2008

Fifth explosive eruption

Movie shows a small explosive eruption, at 7:37 am, from the vent in Halema`uma`u crater. The normal white degassing plume is rapidly overwhelmed by a more robust, ash-rich plume that rises rapidly from the vent. This is the fifth explosive eruption since the new vent at Halema`uma`u appeared in mid-March.

August 20, 2008

Awesome movie! Ash-rich phase

Movie shows an example of an ash-rich phase at Halema`uma`u crater. This event occurred at 3:40pm. These sporadic ash-rich phases are probably due to small rockfalls within the vent.

Nighttime view of tephra-jet explosion, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
July 16, 2008

Nighttime view of tephra-jet explosion, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Incandescent arcs trace the path of lava fragments cast out during a tephra-jet explosion at the Waikupanaha ocean entry in 2008. This is a relatively small explosion, reaching a few tens of meters (yards) height, while one earlier in the day was nearly 70 meters (230 ft) in height. At the bottom of the photograph is the rim of the littoral cone built up by explosion

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Image: Littoral Explosion At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i
July 16, 2008

Littoral Explosion At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

When lava from the Pu'u 'Ō'ō-Kupaianaha eruption, active since 1983, meets the ocean, large littoral explosions can result.

July 10, 2008

Low dome fountain on TEB rootless shield 3

Movie showing the low dome fountain on TEB rootless shield 3; video of spattering from the vent on the west side of Pu`u `Ō `ō crater taken with thermal camera; and video of the vent on the east wall of Pu`u `Ō `ō crater taken with thermal camera.

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USGS science for a changing world logo
December 27, 2002

On January 3, 2003, Kilauea Volcano, perhaps the world’s most active volcano on the Island of Hawai`i, will have been erupting continuously for 20 years. Since the eruption began in 1983, lava flows have covered 43 square miles of the volcano, added nearly 550 acres to the island, created local volcanic air pollution known as "vog," and drawn millions of people to experience and enjoy volcan

USGS
December 27, 2002

On January 3, 2003, Kilauea Volcano, perhaps the world’s most active volcano on the Island of Hawai`i, will have been erupting continuously for 20 years. Since the eruption began in 1983, lava flows have covered 43 square miles of the volcano, added nearly 550 acres to the island, created local volcanic air pollution known as "vog," and drawn millions of people to experience and enjoy...

USGS
December 26, 2002

As we approach the end of 2002, we pause to look back at the year. What can we say about earthquakes in 2002?

USGS
December 19, 2002

Last month, some readers may have noticed a ship cruising back and forth off South Point and the South Kona districts of the Island of Hawai`i.

USGS
December 12, 2002

This is the season when the aroma of pine and fir greets KTA supermarket shoppers as they arrive to buy their fish and poi. Although more than 60,000 trees are imported for the Christmas season, Hawai`i is also home to some trees of its own that deserve hearty celebration.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 6, 2002

Standard fare in geology textbooks and school classrooms across the world is that the hot springs, geysers and volcanoes of Yellowstone National Park, Hawaii, Iceland, and many other volcanic regions were "created" by plumes of hot rock that rise from near the Earth’s core. New results from recently published U.S. Geological Survey research hint, astonishingly, that such plumes may not exist.

USGS
December 2, 2002

Volcanoes have been in the news a lot lately: Etna (Italy), Reventador (Ecuador), Pago (New Britain, Papua New Guinea), Popocatepetl (Mexico)-even our own Mauna Loa. We usually hear about volcanoes only when one is erupting or getting ready to erupt. As a consequence, the news often makes volcanoes look pretty negative.

USGS
November 27, 2002

Friday, November 29, marked the 27th anniversary of the second largest earthquake to occur in Hawai`i. The magnitude-7.2 earthquake originated beneath the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, and that side of the volcano moved 8 m (26 ft) seaward and 3.5 m (11.5 ft) down. What caused the earthquake?

USGS
November 21, 2002

Many people remember that Mount St. Helens erupted with terrible ferocity on May 18, 1980, after a long dormant period. In fact, this is the date now used to mark the reawakening of the volcano. Yet it began to stir well before its activity reached a crescendo on May 18.