Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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August 31, 2008

Pulse of ash and flashes of incandescence

Video shows an ash-emission event at 6:53pm on August 31 from the vent in Halema`uma`u crater. The event begins with a robust pulse of ash, followed shortly by flashes of bright incandescence that rise about 50 yards above the vent.

August 27, 2008

Fifth explosive eruption

Movie shows a small explosive eruption, at 7:37 am, from the vent in Halema`uma`u crater. The normal white degassing plume is rapidly overwhelmed by a more robust, ash-rich plume that rises rapidly from the vent. This is the fifth explosive eruption since the new vent at Halema`uma`u appeared in mid-March.

August 20, 2008

Awesome movie! Ash-rich phase

Movie shows an example of an ash-rich phase at Halema`uma`u crater. This event occurred at 3:40pm. These sporadic ash-rich phases are probably due to small rockfalls within the vent.

Image: Littoral Explosion At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i
July 16, 2008

Littoral Explosion At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

When lava from the Pu'u 'Ō'ō-Kupaianaha eruption, active since 1983, meets the ocean, large littoral explosions can result.

Nighttime view of tephra-jet explosion, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
July 16, 2008

Nighttime view of tephra-jet explosion, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Incandescent arcs trace the path of lava fragments cast out during a tephra-jet explosion at the Waikupanaha ocean entry in 2008. This is a relatively small explosion, reaching a few tens of meters (yards) height, while one earlier in the day was nearly 70 meters (230 ft) in height. At the bottom of the photograph is the rim of the littoral cone built up by explosion

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July 10, 2008

Low dome fountain on TEB rootless shield 3

Movie showing the low dome fountain on TEB rootless shield 3; video of spattering from the vent on the west side of Pu`u `Ō `ō crater taken with thermal camera; and video of the vent on the east wall of Pu`u `Ō `ō crater taken with thermal camera.

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
June 13, 2008

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 5, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 2, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

A plume of volcanic gases (chiefly water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide), tiny lava and rock particles, and droplets drifts southwest in the tradewinds from Halema‘uma‘u Crater. The 500-5,000 metric tons (1.1-11 million pounds) of sulfur dioxide gas emitted each day react in the atmosphere and, with the other gases and particles, form "vog" (volcanic smog)

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Gas plume blown by tradewinds across Crater Rim Drive, Kīlauea Volc...
May 23, 2008

Gas plume blown by tradewinds across Crater Rim Drive, Kīlauea

This section of Crater Rim Drive in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was closed in February 2008 because of the high concentration of volcanic gas blowing across the road from Halema‘uma‘u Crater by prevailing trade winds. The concentration of sulfur dioxide gas in this area is considered hazardous to human health.

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USGS
January 10, 2002

At this new calendar year, we welcome to our staff at the U S Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory our newest volcano watcher, Dr. Peter Cervelli.

photo of lava
January 6, 2002

Growth of west side of Kamoamoa bench

photo of lava
January 4, 2002

Views of south side of Pu`u `O`o, including Puka Nui

USGS
January 3, 2002

It is hard to believe that the Pu`u `O`o eruption became 19 years old on January 3. 

USGS
December 27, 2001

Haleakalā volcano, on Maui, is still in its postshield stage of volcanic evolution, as determined by 50 new isotopic ages. The volcano was long thought to have passed beyond that stage, with a lengthy eruptive lull lasting several hundred thousand years. The new ages show, however, that the lull does not exist and that lavaflows have erupted persistently during the past one million years.

USGS
December 20, 2001

"When you can't breathe, nothing else matters." The motto of the American Lung Association resonates for many of us who live on the island of Hawai'i, especially those located directly downwind of Kīlauea's eruptive vents.

USGS
December 13, 2001

Early next month, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) will commemorate the ninetieth anniversary of its founding. On January 17, 1912, Thomas A. Jaggar arrived at the rim of Kīlauea caldera to devote the next 28 years of his life as Director of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

USGS
December 6, 2001

The roadway into Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is an obstacle course now, as construction is underway for the new entrance station. The new station will have a toilet--something the old one didn't. A lua requires a drain-field pit, and a pit anywhere—particularly in the national park—is an unusual opportunity for volcanologists to examine past explosive eruptions of Kīlauea.

USGS
November 29, 2001

Lava from Kīlauea continues to flow into the sea at East Kupapa`u and Kamoamoa. The steam plumes that usually rise from these ocean-entry points do not surprise visitors; it seems reasonable that incandescent lavaat a temperature of about 1,150 degrees Celsius (2,100 degrees F) would cause seawater to boil.

USGS
November 21, 2001

Every year about this time, the HVO staff asks the question: Will the volcano behave over the holidays? Given the amount of volcanic and seismic activity on this island, our holidays are bound to be disrupted now and then.

USGS
November 15, 2001

A "Volcano Watch" article several months ago provided an overview of the recently installed current earthquakes web pages at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Behind the scenes at HVO are people responsible for maintaining the seismic stations, performing data analysis, and producing catalogs, along with many other data products.

USGS
November 8, 2001

Everybody is familiar with ocean tides that cause the ocean level to go up and down, usually twice a day. We can go down to the beach and watch this tidal action along any coast in the world. On a global level, the ocean tides are actually waves whose crests are half a world apart and traveling from east to west. At most points on the globe, the tidal crest comes by about every 12.5 hours.