Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Filter Total Items: 68
Date published: July 5, 2016
Status: Active

Monitoring Hawaiian Biodiversity: Changes to forest birds and their habitat

Hawaiian forests are beset by many stressors, resulting in a complex pattern of altered ecosystems, impeirled species, and (in some areas) substantial protection and restoration. Short-term studies focused on specific sites or biota have limited value in understanding landscape-level change. Long-term and spatialy extensive data are needed to understand how ecosystems are reacting to both...

Date published: May 13, 2016
Status: Active

Restoration Ecology

Restoration of ecological systems in wildland areas often involves restoring species to habitats degraded by invasive plant and animal species.  Often, such invasive species exert community level impacts, such as direct competition, but may also alter ecosystem function. For example, invasive plants have been documented to alter fire regimes, soil nutrients and microbes, food webs, and/or...

Date published: May 11, 2016
Status: Active

Status and Trends of Hawaiian Flora and Fauna

Hawai‘i has more endangered species than any other state - over 394 species.  In spite of this fact, there is not a central clearing house for information on the status and trends of these species.  Information is spread over the following areas:

1. USGS maintains some information on Forest Birds.

2. USFWS maintains summary data on listed and proposed plants.

3. The...

Date published: May 11, 2016
Status: Completed

Dynamics of a Koa Looper Moth Outbreak and Response by the Native Forest Community

A massive outbreak of the native koa looper moth (Scotorythra paludicola; Geometridae) defoliated more than a third of the koa (Acacia koa) forest on Hawai‘i Island during 2013–2014. Our objective was to record the dynamics of the koa looper (Scotorythra paludicola) outbreak and evaluate the response to the outbreak by the forest ecosystem generally as well as select native and invasive...

Date published: April 26, 2016
Status: Active

Webinar: Recreational Seascapes: Integrating Human and Mechanical Observations on Hawaiʻi Island

View this webinar to learn how scientists explored how people on the seascape experienced climate and environmental changes in Hawai'i.

Contacts: Noelani Puniwai
Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Development of an Environmental Assessment and Eradication Plan to Remove Tilapia from Ponds and Wetlands in National Parks on the Island of Hawai’i

Mozambique tilapia, a highly invasive non-native fish of the family Cichlidae, were discovered in a wetland in Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park on the Big Island of Hawai'i. As the U.S. National Park Service works to restore the natural communities and functions of wetland ecosystems on the island, the eradication of the tilapia population is considered necessary to fully achieve...

Contacts: Leo Nico, Ph.D.
Date published: April 13, 2016

Understanding Coastal Change

Scientists perform a range of studies that document, assess, and model coastal change, risk, and vulnerability. Studies include historical shoreline change, the geologic structure and history of coastal regions, sediment supply and transport, sea-level rise, and how extreme storm events affect rates and impacts of coastal change.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Geologic Hazards and Catastrophic Events

We study the distribution and hazard potential of coastal and submarine events such as earthquakes and submarine landslides and associated tsunami potential, hurricane induced coastal inundation, extreme storms, sea-level rise and oil and gas spills. We also model development to help evaluate and forecast coastal hazard probability and occurrence.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Ocean Resources for America's Needs

Our scientists conduct research studies focused on geologic mapping, sampling and understanding of mineral and energy resources and studies of the geologic setting and processes to inform renewable energy development offshore.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Science

We bring together multidisciplinary expertise focused on developing tools and models to improve understanding of how healthy ecosystems function as well as how they respond to environmental changes and human impacts including ecosystem restoration. Research studies address coral reef, coastal wetland, benthic habitat and groundwater resources.

Date published: March 17, 2016

Volcano Hazards Assessments Help Mitigate Disasters

The Volcano Hazards Program develops long-range volcano hazards assessments. These includes a summary of the specific hazards, their impact areas, and a map showing ground-hazard zones. The assessments are also critical for planning long-term land-use and effective emergency-response measures, especially when a volcano begins to show signs of unrest.

Date published: March 9, 2016

Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center

We work with others to provide scientific understanding and technologies needed to support and implement sound management and conservation of our Nation's biological resources in Hawaii and other Pacific island locations.

Filter Total Items: 89
Date published: December 21, 2016

Digital image mosaics of the nearshore coastal waters of selected areas on the Hawaiian Islands of Hawai‘i, Maui, Moloka‘i, and O‘ahu generated using aerial photographs and SHOALS airborne lidar bathymetry data

USGS has the capability to compile digital image mosaics that are useful for creating detailed map products. Image maps covering the shallow near-shore coastal waters have been produced for several of the main Hawaiian Islands, including Hawai‘i, Maui, Moloka‘i, and O‘ahu and are presented in JPEG2000 (.jp2) format.

Date published: June 15, 2016

Hawaiʻi Rainfall--current conditions

Continuously recording rainfall sites utilize equipment that automatically record and store the amount of rainfall at specific intervals. Many sites are equipped with telemetry so that information can be electronically transmitted and displayed on the internet in real time.

Date published: June 15, 2016

Hawaiʻi Water Quality--current conditions

Suspended-sediment concentrations are determined from samples collected by an autosampler or collected manually.

Date published: June 15, 2016

Hawaiʻi Groundwater--current conditions

At some sites, groundwater levels in wells are manually measured, using steel or electrical tapes or pressure transducers. Other sites utilize electronic equipment to record and store the water levels at specific intervals. Some sites are equipped with telemetry so that information can be electronically transmitted and displayed in real-time on the internet.

Date published: June 15, 2016

Hawaiʻi Streamflow--current conditions

Continuously recording surface-water stations are stations with equipment that automatically record and store data at specific intervals. Many stations are equipped with telemetry so that information can be electronically transmitted and displayed on the internet in real time.

Date published: April 20, 2016

Structures Data

USGS data portray selected structures data, including the location and characteristics of manmade facilities. Characteristics consist of a structure's physical form (footprint), function, name, location, and detailed information about the structure. The types of structures collected are largely determined by the needs of the disaster planning and response and homeland security organizations....

Date published: April 19, 2016

The United States Interagency Elevation Inventory (USIEI)

The USIEI is a comprehensive, nationwide listing of known high-accuracy topographic and bathymetric data for the United States and its territories. The project is a collaborative effort of the USGS and NOAA with contributions from other federal agencies. The inventory supports the 3D Elevation Program and the Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping effort. This resource is updated in Spring and...

Date published: April 19, 2016

Elevation Data

The 3DEP products and services available through The National Map consist of lidar point clouds (LPC), standard digital elevation models (DEMs) at various horizontal resolutions, elevation source and associated datasets, an elevation point query service and bulk point query service. All 3DEP products are available, free of charge and without use restrictions.

Date published: April 12, 2016

Orthoimagery Data

Orthoimagery data typically are high resolution aerial images that combine the visual attributes of an aerial photograph with the spatial accuracy and reliability of a planimetric map. The National Map offers public domain, 1-meter orthoimagery for the conterminous United States with many urban areas and other locations at 2-foot or finer resolution.

Date published: April 12, 2016

The National Map Small-Scale Collection

The National Map offers a collection of small-scale datasets, most of which are at 1:1,000,000. The National Map publishes two data collections at one million-scale: one for Global Map users and one for National Map users. In terms of vector geometry, the lines, points, and areas in these data collections are identical. The difference is in the attributes assigned to these features.

Filter Total Items: 375
Graphic showing digital elevation models and profiles
December 28, 2020

This graphic depicts the changes to Kīlauea Volcano's summit resulting from the eruption that began on December 20, 2020.

Kīlauea summit eruption reference map showing the location of ongoing lake activity
December 27, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption reference map showing the location of ongoing lake activity

Color contour map
December 27, 2020

December 27, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lake level and elevations of features within the caldera

Color map of lava lake temperature
December 27, 2020

December 26, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Maps made from aerial imagery taken on a December 26 overflight of Kīlauea Volcano's summit
December 26, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption maps constructed from aerial imagery

Color map showing lava lake thickness
December 25, 2020

December 25, 2020 preliminary map of the lava lake depth at 2:15 p.m. HST.

Color thermal map of lava lake
December 24, 2020

December 23, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Lava lake level measurements collected during a field visit of Kīlauea Volcano's summit just after 11:44 a.m. HST on December 23
December 23, 2020

December 23, 2020 preliminary map of the lava lake depth at 11:44 a.m. HST.

Color thermal map of lava lake
December 22, 2020

December 22, 2020—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map constructed from aerial imagery

Color map showing lava lake thickness
December 22, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption lava lake depth map generated from December 22, 2020 imagery

Map of volcano summit activity
December 22, 2020

Kīlauea summit eruption reference map showing the location of current and previous lake activity

Color interferogram showing volcano deformation
December 22, 2020

This “interferogram” was created from satellite radar data acquired over Kīlauea Volcano on December 6 and 21 (at 6 PM HST each day). The colored fringes show ground deformation that occurred during that 15-day period. Each fringe is equivalent to about 1.55 cm (0.6 in) of ground deformation towards or away from the satellite.

Filter Total Items: 121
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Year Published: 2011

Shallow degassing events as a trigger for very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

The first eruptive activity at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit in 25 years began in March 2008 with the opening of a 35-m-wide vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater. The new activity has produced prominent very-long-period (VLP) signals corresponding with two new behaviors: episodic tremor bursts and small explosive events, both of which represent degassing...

Patrick, Matthew R.; Wilson, David C.; Fee, David; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Don
Patrick, Matthew, Wilson, David, Fee, David, Orr, Tim, and Swanson, Don, 2011, Shallow degassing events as a trigger for very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Bulletin of Volcanology, v. 73, p. 1179–1186.

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Year Published: 2011

Hydrogeology of the Hawaiian islands

Volcanic-rock aquifers are the most extensive and productive aquifers in the Hawaiian Islands. These aquifers contain different types of groundwater systems depending on the geologic setting in which they occur. The most common groundwater systems include coastal freshwater-lens systems in the dike-free flanks of the volcanoes and dike-impounded...

Cabrera, Maria del Carmen; Lambán, Luis Javier; Valverde, Margarida; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Oki, Delwyn S.

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Year Published: 2011

Recent storm and tsunami coarse-clast deposit characteristics, southeast Hawai'i

Deposits formed by extreme waves can be useful in elucidating the type and characteristics of the depositional event. The study area on the southeast coast of the island of Hawaiʻi is characterized by the presence of geologically young basalts of known age that are mantled by recent wave-derived sedimentary deposits. The area has been impacted by...

Richmond, B.M.; Watt, Sebastian; Buckley, M.; Jaffe, B. E.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Morton, R.A.
Recent storm and tsunami coarse-clast deposit characteristics, southeast Hawai'i; 2011; Article; Journal; Marine Geology; Richmond, B. M.; Watt, S.; Buckley, M.; Jaffe, B. E.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Morton, R. A.

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Year Published: 2010

Changes of freshwater-lens thickness in basaltic island aquifers overlain by thick coastal sediments

Freshwater-lens thickness and long-term changes in freshwater volume in coastal aquifers are commonly assessed through repeated measurement of salinity profiles from monitor wells that penetrate into underlying salt water. In Hawaii, the thickest measured freshwater lens is currently 262 m in dike-free, volcanic-rock aquifers that are overlain by...

Rotzoll, Kolja; Oki, Delwyn S.; El-Kadi, Aly I.

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Year Published: 2010

Effects of groundwater withdrawal on borehole flow and salinity measured in deep monitor wells in Hawai'i-implications for groundwater management

Water-resource managers in Hawai`i rely heavily on salinity profiles from deep monitor wells to estimate the thickness of freshwater and the depth to the midpoint of the transition zone between freshwater and saltwater in freshwater-lens systems. The deep monitor wells are typically open boreholes below the water table and extend hundreds of feet...

Rotzoll, Kolja
Effects of groundwater withdrawal on borehole flow and salinity measured in deep monitor wells in Hawai'i-implications for groundwater management; 2010; SIR; 2010-5058; Rotzoll, Kolja

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Year Published: 2010

Streamflow, suspended-sediment, and soil-erosion data from Kaulana and Hakioawa watersheds, Kaho'olawe, Hawai'i,

Various events over the last two centuries have destroyed the vegetation and caused rapid soil erosion on large areas of the small, arid, windy tropical shield-volcano island of Kaho`olawe, Hawai`i. These activities were largely halted in the 1990s, and efforts have been made to restore the island's vegetation in order to stem erosion. In 2003,...

Izuka, Scot K.; Abbott, Lyman L.
Streamflow, suspended-sediment, and soil-erosion data from Kaulana and Hakioawa watersheds, Kaho'olawe, Hawai'i,; 2010; OFR; 2010-1182; Izuka, Scot K.; Abbott, Lyman L.

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Year Published: 2010

Hawaii StreamStats; a web application for defining drainage-basin characteristics and estimating peak-streamflow statistics

Reliable estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are necessary for the safe and efficient design of roads, bridges, water-conveyance structures, and flood-control projects and for the management of flood plains and flood-prone areas. StreamStats provides a simple, fast, and reproducible method to define drainage-basin characteristics...

Rosa, Sarah N.; Oki, Delwyn S.
Hawaii StreamStats; a web application for defining drainage-basin characteristics and estimating peak-streamflow statistics; 2010; FS; 2010-3052; Rosa, Sarah N.; Oki, Delwyn S.

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Year Published: 2010

Terrigenous sediment provenance from geochemical tracers, south Molokai reef flat, Hawaii

Land-derived runoff is one of the greatest threats to coral-reef health. Identification of runoff sources is an important step in erosion mitigation efforts. A geochemical sediment provenance study was done in uplands and across the adjacent fringing reef on the southeast shore of Molokai, Hawaii, to determine whether sediment runoff originated...

Takesue, R.K.
Terrigenous sediment provenance from geochemical tracers, south Molokai reef flat, Hawaii; 2010; OFR; 2010-1155; Takesue, R. K.

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Year Published: 2010

Rainfall, discharge, and water-quality data during stormwater monitoring, H-1 storm drain, Oahu, Hawaii, July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2010

Storm runoff water-quality samples were collected as part of the State of Hawaii Department of Transportation Stormwater Monitoring Program. The program is designed to assess the effects of highway runoff and urban runoff collected by the H-1 storm drain on the Manoa-Palolo Drainage Canal. This report summarizes rainfall, discharge, and water-...

Presley, Todd K.; Jamison, Marcael T.J.
Rainfall, discharge, and water-quality data during stormwater monitoring, H-1 storm drain, Oahu, Hawaii, July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2010; 2010; OFR; 2010-1161; Presley, Todd K.; Jamison, Marcael T. J.

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Year Published: 2010

Kiholo Bay, Hawaii, earthquake sequence of 2006: Relationship of the main shock slip with locations and source parameters of aftershocks

We study the source process of the Kīholo Bay earthquake (MW 6.7), which occurred beneath the northwest part of the Island of Hawai‘i on 15 October 2006, and static stress drops of small earthquakes that occurred in 2006 and 2007 around the main shock including aftershocks. We relocate the aftershocks to determine the fault plane from the two...

Yamada, Takuji; Okubo, Paul G.; Wolfe, Cecily
Yamada, Takuji, Okubo, P.G., and Wolfe, C.J., 2010, Kīholo Bay, Hawai‘i, earthquake sequence of 2006: Relationship of the main shock slip with locations and source parameters of aftershocks: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 115, B08304, 12 p., doi:10.1029/2009JB006657.

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Year Published: 2010

Flood-Frequency Estimates for Streams on Kaua`i, O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i, State of Hawai`i

This study provides an updated analysis of the magnitude and frequency of peak stream discharges in Hawai`i. Annual peak-discharge data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during and before water year 2008 (ending September 30, 2008) at stream-gaging stations were analyzed. The existing generalized-skew value for the State of Hawai`i was...

Oki, Delwyn S.; Rosa, Sarah N.; Yeung, Chiu W.
Flood-Frequency Estimates for Streams on Kaua`i, O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i, State of Hawai`i; 2010; SIR; 2010-5035; Oki, Delwyn S.; Rosa, Sarah N.; Yeung, Chiu W.

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Year Published: 2010

Effects of Surface-Water Diversion on Streamflow, Recharge, Physical Habitat, and Temperature, Na Wai `Eha, Maui, Hawai`i

The perennial flow provided by Waihe‘e River, Waiehu Stream, ‘Īao Stream, and Waikapū Stream, collectively known as Nā Wai ‘Ehā (“The Four Streams”), made it possible for widespread agricultural activities to flourish in the eastern part of West Maui, Hawai‘i. The streams of the Nā...

Oki, Delwyn S.; Wolff, Reuben H.; Perreault, Jeff A.
Effects of Surface-Water Diversion on Streamflow, Recharge, Physical Habitat, and Temperature, Na Wai `Eha, Maui, Hawai`i; 2010; SIR; 2010-5011; Oki, Delwyn S.; Wolff, Reuben H.; Perreault, Jeff A.

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October 5, 2021

Lava fountains - western fissure, Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea - Oct 5, 2021

Lava fountains from the western fissure vent in the Halema‘uma‘u crater wall, at Kīlauea's summit during the ongoing eruption. The shaking at the end of the video is due to strong wind gusts moving the tripod. This video clip was recorded on October 5, 2021, from the southern crater rim. 

A telephoto view of fountaining at the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

A telephoto view of fountaining at the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Spatter from the fountain has built a horseshoe-shaped cone around the vent in the western crater wall. Molten spatter accumulating on the cone forms a tiny stream of lava down the north side (bottom center). This photo was taken on October 4, 2021, from the northwest

...
An overflow of lava from the active lava lake poured into and along the levee
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

An overflow of lava from the active lake (left) poured onto and along the levee (right) on the eastern end of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. USGS photo by M. Patrick taken on October 4, 2021.

A brief gap in the fume provides a clear view of the fountaining at the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater,
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

A brief gap in the fume provides a clear view of the fountaining at the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates remain elevated and were measured at approximately 7,000 tonnes per day on October 4. USGS photo taken by M. Patrick from the southern crater rim on October 4, 2021.

October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

The eruption continues in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. This video shows the dominant fountain at the west vent, from two different angles, as well as the smaller fountaining source emerging through the lava lake. 

Color photograph of active lava lake
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

KWcam image taken on October 4, 2021, just before 6 a.m. HST. This image shows the ongoing eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu crater at the summit of Kīlauea. The eruption began the afternoon of September 29, 2021, as fissures in the floor of the crater; this activity is generating a lava lake that is slowly filling the crater. Near-real-time images captured by the KWcam are 

...
zoomed-in view of the erupting western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u shows lava fountaining activity
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

This zoomed-in view of the erupting western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u shows lava fountaining activity on the morning of October 4, 2021. The fountains have built a C-shaped spatter rampart around their source, which is now submerged in the rising lava lake. Using a laser rangefinder, HVO field crews measured the spatter rampart to be standing 20 m (66 ft) above the

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zoomed-in view of the eastern edge of the main island in the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

This photo, captured on the morning of October 4, 2021, provides a zoomed-in view of the eastern edge of the main island in the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake. In the earliest days of the ongoing Kīlauea eruption, this was the site of an energetic eruptive vent that showered the island with spatter and tephra. Activity had waned substantially, but not completely: volcanic gases

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Color photograph of lava lake surface
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

A telephoto view of foundering in the active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Foundering occurs when denser and cooler solidified crust (black) sinks below less dense liquid lava (orange). Photo taken at 7:48 a.m. HST on October 4, 2021. USGS photo by J.M. Chang.

A wide view of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, taken from the western crater rim
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

A wide view of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, taken from the western crater rim. The western vent (lower right) remains the dominant source of fountaining, while low lava fountains are still emerging through the southern portion of the lava lake (center right). USGS photo by M. Patrick taken on October 4, 2021.

A telephoto image of fountaining from the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

A telephoto image of fountaining from the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Spatter from the fountain continues to build up a cone around the vent, which is almost entirely out of view from this angle. This photo was taken from the western crater rim on October 4, 2021. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

A close-up view of the western fissure and lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

A close-up view of the western fissure and lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava lake crust develops a complex pattern as it flows away from its source at the western vent (bottom right). USGS photo by M. Patrick taken on October 4, 2021.

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On the morning of August 13, HVO geologists made observations from the western rim of Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea
August 13, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

A man measuring 6 feet 4 inches tall lies on a ballistic block that was thrown from Kīlauea caldera
August 12, 2021

More people were probably killed by the 1790 eruption of Kīlauea than by any other eruption in what is now the United States. Several hundred men, women, and children perished during explosions at the summit of the volcano.  

On Tuesday, August 10, HVO scientists traversed the west and south rims of Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea
August 11, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Scientist levels surveying instrument on lava flow
August 9, 2021

HVO geophysicists have recently been undertaking a Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign across Kīlauea.

Color image of the Island of Hawaii
August 5, 2021

Geologists at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) had their mobile phones buzzing this past week with automated alert messages, notifying them that there was something new and hot on the Island of Hawaiʻi.  Although the internal alert system is meant to detect new volcanic activity, no eruption was occurring.  

Good views of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake...
August 2, 2021

See a list of recent Hawaiian Volcano Observatory publications and data releases here.

Color photograph of lava lake
August 2, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of caldera
July 30, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color images of volcanic plume
July 29, 2021

This week marks the second anniversary of the appearance of water in Kīlauea’s Halema‘uma‘u crater, so it seems timely to discuss the water lake’s demise last December 20, or rather, its transformation into a volcanic plume and how we use weather radar to investigate how that happened.

Color photograph of scientists in field
July 28, 2021

Field Work at Keller Well. Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

HVO geologist conducts maintenance on the S1cam web camera located along the southern rim of Halema‘uma‘u
July 26, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

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