Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Filter Total Items: 382
Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
July 2, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Monday, July 2

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 30, 2018

Map as of 3:00 p.m. HST, June 30, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 29, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Friday, June 29

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 28, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, June 28, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 27, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Wednesday, June 27

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 26, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 26, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 26, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Tuesday, June 26

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 25, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, June 25, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 24, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Sunday, June 24

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 22, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, June 22, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 21, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Thursday, June 21.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 19, 2018

Map as of 1:00 p.m. HST, June 19, 2018

Filter Total Items: 121
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 1990

National water summary 1987: Hydrologic events and water supply and use

Water use in the United States, as measured by freshwater withdrawals in 1985, averaged 338,000 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), which is enough water to cover the 48 conterminous States to a depth of about 2.4 inches. Only 92,300 Mgal/d, or 27.3 percent of the water withdrawn, was consumptive use and thus lost to immediate further use; the...

Carr, Jerry E.; Chase, Edith B.; Paulson, Richard W.; Moody, David W.
Attribution: Water, Central Midwest Water Science Center, Dakota Water Science Center, , , Kansas Water Science Center, Minnesota Water Science Center, Pennsylvania Water Science Center, Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center, Utah Water Science Center, , Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, Upper Midwest Water Science Center, Water Resources, Water Availability and Use Science Program, , , Region 4: Mississippi Basin, Region 6: Arkansas-Rio Grande-Texas-Gulf, , Region 7: Upper Colorado Basin, Region 1: North Atlantic-Appalachian, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming, United States of America
National water summary 1987: hydrologic events and water supply and use; 1990; WSP; 2350; Carr, Jerry E.; Chase, Edith B.; Paulson, Richard W.; Moody, David W.

Filter Total Items: 2,356
Color webcam photo of lava lake
October 7, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 7, 2021

KWcam image taken on October 7, 2021, just after 6 a.m. HST. This image shows the ongoing eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu crater at the summit of Kīlauea. The eruption began the afternoon of September 29, 2021, as fissures in the floor of the crater; this activity is generating a lava lake that is slowly filling the crater. Near-real-time images captured by the KWcam are 

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Color photograph of volcanic vent
October 7, 2021

October 7, 2021 — Kīlauea

The eruption continues in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Lava fountaining no longer emerges from the central portion of the lake, with fountaining limited to the west vent shown here. Low fountaining within the cone supplies lava into the lake via a short spillway. USGS image by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of lava
October 6, 2021

Crustal foundering in Halema‘uma‘u

A large crustal foundering event in Kīlauea's ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption occurred in the late afternoon on October 6, 2021. This photo was taken from the northwest crater rim looking east across the lava lake. USGS Photo: K. Lynn

Color photograph of lava fountain
October 6, 2021

West vent fountain on October 6, 2021

The west vent fountain in Kīlauea's ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption was 12 m (39 ft) above the lava lake surface in the late afternoon of October 6, 2021. This photo was taken by USGS geologist K. Lynn from the northwest rim of Halema‘uma‘u looking south.

Color map showing lava lake eruption features
October 5, 2021

October 5, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption reference map

This reference map depicts the ongoing Kīlauea summit eruption on October 5, 2021. Two eruptive vents are active at this time: one along the western edge of the rising lava lake, and one within the south-central portion of the lake. Several islands from the December 2020–May 2021 eruption dot the lake surface, some of which were initially drowned but later floated back to

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Color photograph of scientist monitoring eruption
October 5, 2021

HVO geologist observing lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u - October 5, 2021

A Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) geologist notes observations of the active lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. HVO scientists continue to monitor the ongoing eruption from an area within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to the public due to hazardous conditions. USGS photo taken by N. Deligne on October 5, 2021.

Color photograph of active lava lake
October 5, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halema‘uma‘u crater - October 5, 2021

A view of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, taken from the western crater rim looking east. The western vent (lower right) remains the dominant source of fountaining. One fountain remains active in the south portion of the lake (center right). The silver-grey lava comes from the western vent, and the dark black lava comes from the south

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Color photograph of vent and lava lake
October 5, 2021

Close-up view of west vent, Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea - October 5, 2021

Photo of fountaining from the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Spatter from the fountain continues to build up a horseshoe-shaped cone around the vent, with lava flowing into the lake at the base. This photo was taken from the western crater rim on October 5, 2021. USGS photo by N. Deligne.

Color photograph of volcanic vent
October 5, 2021

Western fissure, Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea - October 5, 2021

Lava fountains from the western fissure vent in the Halema‘uma‘u crater wall, at Kīlauea's summit during the ongoing eruption. USGS video by N. Deligne.

October 5, 2021

Lava fountains - western fissure, Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea - Oct 5, 2021

Lava fountains from the western fissure vent in the Halema‘uma‘u crater wall, at Kīlauea's summit during the ongoing eruption. The shaking at the end of the video is due to strong wind gusts moving the tripod. This video clip was recorded on October 5, 2021, from the southern crater rim. 

A telephoto view of fountaining at the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

A telephoto view of fountaining at the western vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Spatter from the fountain has built a horseshoe-shaped cone around the vent in the western crater wall. Molten spatter accumulating on the cone forms a tiny stream of lava down the north side (bottom center). This photo was taken on October 4, 2021, from the northwest

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An overflow of lava from the active lava lake poured into and along the levee
October 4, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater - October 4, 2021

An overflow of lava from the active lake (left) poured onto and along the levee (right) on the eastern end of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. USGS photo by M. Patrick taken on October 4, 2021.

Filter Total Items: 2,350
Color photograph of lava lake
May 18, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 229 m (751 ft) deep this morning, May 18. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of lava lake
May 17, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 229 m (751 ft) deep this morning, May 17. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, has been growing over the past several weeks
May 14, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 229 m (751 ft) deep this morning, May 14. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

HVO’s continuous, automated laser rangefinder on the western rim of Halemaʻumaʻu
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea’s summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu is approaching its five-month anniversary on Thursday, May 20, while the water lake that occupied the crater for the previous seventeen months seems like a distant memory. 

A wide view of Halema‘uma‘u from the western crater rim, at the summit of Kīlauea
May 12, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 229 m (751 ft) deep this morning, May 12. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of person in colorful shirt in front of rock wall
May 12, 2021

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — On May 9, 2021, Christina (Tina) Neal became the new director of the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Science Center, home of the Alaska, California, Cascades, Hawaiian and Yellowstone volcano observatories.  

A telephoto view of the active lava surface in Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea
May 11, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 229 m (751 ft) deep this morning, May 11. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of lava lake
May 7, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 228 m (748 ft) deep this morning, May 7. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Plots of volcano deformation data
May 6, 2021

Although Mauna Loa is Earth’s largest active volcano, it has lived in the shadow of Kīlauea since it last erupted in 1984.  The geologic record shows that Mauna Loa erupts every seven years on average; however, 37 years have passed since lava flows from the volcano’s Northeast Rift Zone came within 7 km (4 miles) of Hilo. 

Color photograph of lava lake
May 5, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 228 m (748 ft) deep this morning, May 5. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Hiking along the rim of the 2018 collapse area at the summit of Kīlauea
May 3, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 227 m (744 ft) deep this morning, May 3. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.