Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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Airplane landing field at Kīlauea Volcano strewn with blocks from s...
May 22, 1924

Airplane landing field at Kīlauea strewn with blocks from several e...

Prior to the eruption of 1924, this area was swept clean and used as a landing field for airplanes. This view looking toward the north rim of Halemaumau shows the air field littered with ballistic blocks from explosions in the 1924 eruption.

Explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea Volcano as viewed from Uēkahun...
May 18, 1924

Explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea May 18, 1924.

This was probably the strongest explosion of the eruption. Rocks and debris fell among spectators southeast of Halemaumau, causing one fatality. A torrential downpour and an electrical storm followed.

Spectators flee explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea Volcano, 1114 ...
May 18, 1924

Spectators flee explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea, May 18, 1925

Acting HVO director Ruy Finch snapped this photograph of spectators running away as large blocks were tossed about 600 meters (2000 feet) onto an airplane landing field. Lorrin A. Thurston provided this description: "About three minutes later with a sudden dull roar a column of inky black eruption cloud shot upward from the pit and great masses of gray ash rolled out from

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Park superintendent Thomas Boles after a narrow escape at Kīlauea V...
May 14, 1924

Park superintendent Thomas Boles after a narrow escape at Kīlauea, ...

Boles poses on the grounds of the Volcano House hotel with the Halemaumau eruption plume in the background. He fell cutting his hands and a knee while fleeing an explosion the day before. After his close call the superintendent barred all public access within two miles of Halemaumau.

Explosion at Halemaumau as seen from Uēkahuna Bluff, at Kīlauea Vol...
May 13, 1924

Explosion at Halema‘uma‘u as seen from Uēkahuna Bluff, at Kīlauea, ...

Eight persons, including newspaper and movie men observing the scene at Halema‘uma‘u, were caught in a rain of hot rocks from this explosion. The rocks emitted hissing sounds as hot gas, mainly steam, escaped from them. Park superintendent Thomas Boles was knocked down twice by this bombardment.

Observer examines boulder ejected from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea Volca...
May 11, 1924

Boulder ejected from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea, May 11, 1925

On May 11, Ruy Finch and W.O. Clark visited Halemaumau and found a rock fragment weighing about 180 kg (400 pounds) that had been thrown 60 meters (200 feet) from the rim of the crater.

One of the first explosion clouds from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea Volca...
May 10, 1924

First explosion clouds from Halemaumau, Kīlauea 1925

Later scientists at the Observatory listed May 10 as the first day of the eruptive series. Between this date and May 27, they carefully recorded all explosions, ballistic falls, electric storms, and muddy rains as well as earthquakes felt and recorded on seismographs.

Scientists looking into the bright glow of Mauna Loa's 1942 eruptiv...
April 28, 1924

Scientists looking into bright glow of Mauna Loa's 1942 eruptive ve...

Scientists looking into the bright glow of Mauna Loa's 1942 eruptive vent. Eruption occurred during WWII and was not publicized to prevent Japanese war planes from navigating to the island at night.

Views of Mauna Loa Volcano during clear weather day (left) and on d...

Views of Mauna Loa Volcano during clear weather day and on day when...

These views of Mauna Loa are from near the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory looking toward the west. The view on left is typical during strong trade winds that blow the plume from Halema‘uma‘u Crater southwest of the summit area. The view on right is common during slack winds that allow vog conditions to develop in the summit area of Kīlauea. During such conditions, people

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[M1cam] Mauna Loa's Northeast Rift Zone from HVO Observation Tower

This image is from a research camera positioned in the observation tower at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The camera looks northwest toward the summit and Northeast Rift Zone of Mauna Loa.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal

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Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of ...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of ...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of Hamakua Volcanics. Laupahoehoe Volcanics are inferred to overlie a vast area of Hamakua Volcanics on the upper flanks and summit.

[KWcam] - Halemaʻumaʻu, water lake, and down-dropped block

Live Panorama of Halemaʻumaʻu, water lake, and down-dropped caldera floor from the west rim of the new summit collapse features [KWcam]. 

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better

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Filter Total Items: 2,082
USGS
November 16, 2000

The Kalij Pheasant is an unparalleled success among game birds introduced in the 50th State. Because Hawai`i has no native upland game birds, people have imported a total of twelve species of pheasants, quail, partridges, peafowl, and wild turkeys from all over the world. Last to arrive was the Kalij, released in 1962 at Pu`u Wa`awa`a Ranch.

USGS
November 9, 2000

Anyone who has been close to an active flow or steam vent knows that the heat coming from one of these features is intense and, at times, overwhelming! It will come as no surprise, then, that thermal monitoring of volcanoes and their products plays an important part in volcanology.
 

USGS
November 3, 2000

Kīlauea has been erupting for nearly 18 years, and there is no sign of it stopping anytime soon. But all previous Kīlauea eruptions ended, and there's no reason to think this one is any different. What can we expect when the curtain finally falls?
 

USGS
October 26, 2000

To many of us, Hawaiian volcanoes loom sleepily overhead, occasionally stirring from their slumber and oozing lava flows down their flanks toward the sea. Deep within the towering volcanoes, however, lies the potential for powerful explosions of volcanic ash and blocks.
 

USGS
October 19, 2000

Driving along the Queen Ka`ahumanu highway from Kailua-Kona to Waikoloa, one passes a vast expanse of well-exposed lava rock. These flows are from Hualālai and Mauna Loa Volcanoes and are of various ages. If you slow down and look carefully, you are able to recognize individual flows by their distinctive surface texture, color, or luster.
 

USGS
October 12, 2000

Sweeping vistas into Haleakalā Crater are seen in the final stretch of road at Haleakalā National Park, from the summit visitor center to the top of Red Hill. Some observers, however, focus their attention on the pavement, which is prominently cracked perpendicular to travel direction. 

USGS
October 5, 2000

Earthquakes occur every day on the Island of Hawai`i. Most are small, less than magnitude 3, but typically a couple are felt by someone each week. Damaging earthquakes occur every few years, and very large ones take place every few decades or more often.

USGS
September 28, 2000

Lava flows and volcanic eruptions played a major role in the Earth's history since it was formed some four billion years ago. We can look at rocks that are almost that age and see structures and crystals similar to those that form today.
 

USGS
September 21, 2000

Cats have been our pets and rat-catchers since the dawn of civilization. Many of us grew up with cats or now keep them (including the authors of this column!).

USGS
September 14, 2000

Those of you who pay attention to the goings-on of the volcano are well aware that the quality of lava viewing is highly uneven. Some days you can hike for sweltering hours over recently active flows without seeing any red lava. 

USGS
September 7, 2000

Sometimes in science you find something that theory says you shouldn't. Then your pulse starts racing. Are your observations or calculations wrong? Is the theory wrong? Or is there a middle ground, in which observations can be fit to theory if both are tweaked a little?
 

USGS
August 31, 2000

What do Kīlauea Volcano's eruption and Hilo's 7:30 a.m. traffic have in common? For one thing, lots of stops and starts. The stops and starts in the eruption at Kīlauea are the by now familiar pauses; the stops and starts in busy Hilo traffic might be referred to in more colorful terms.