Unified Interior Regions

Illinois

The USGS Central Midwest Water Science Center collects, analyzes and disseminates the impartial hydrologic data and information needed to wisely and effectively manage water resources in Illinois. Our scientific research affects current issues ranging from flood and drought hazards to the impact and control of invasive species.

Link to Science Center

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 83
USGS
September 30, 2008

Although Hurricane Ike is long gone, its impact lingers more than a thousand miles from where it made landfall.  Runoff from tributaries dumped massive amounts of sediment into Lake Michigan, contaminating the water, compromising near-shore navigation and raising E coli bacteria to levels unsafe for swimming. 

USGS
April 21, 2008

Friday's magnitude-5.2 earthquake in southern Illinois is a reminder that earthquakes are a national hazard.

USGS
April 18, 2008

Today's early morning earthquake that jolted many in the central U.S. is a reminder that seismic events do occur in areas not normally thought of as "earthquake country."

USGS
January 29, 2008

Nine states in the Mississippi River Basin contribute the majority of nutrients to the Northern Gulf of Mexico, threatening the economic and ecological health of one of the nation's largest and most productive fisheries.

USGS
January 24, 2008

The overabundance of nutrients in the Gulf has resulted in a zone of low dissolved oxygen, or hypoxia, which can cause stress and death in bottom-dwelling organisms, threatening the economic and ecological health of the one of the nation's most productive fisheries.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 8, 2006

A report published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contains a regional map and an associated database that inventory 36 locations of reported natural asbestos and fibrous amphibole occurrences in the central United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS
October 7, 2003

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers investigating 51 streams in nine Midwestern States found low levels of the herbicide glyphosate in 36 percent of the samples tested, and found its degradation product in 69 percent of the samples tested. Antibiotics were found in few samples.