Unified Interior Regions

Illinois

The USGS Central Midwest Water Science Center collects, analyzes and disseminates the impartial hydrologic data and information needed to wisely and effectively manage water resources in Illinois. Our scientific research affects current issues ranging from flood and drought hazards to the impact and control of invasive species.

Link to Science Center

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS
October 7, 2003

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers investigating 51 streams in nine Midwestern States found low levels of the herbicide glyphosate in 36 percent of the samples tested, and found its degradation product in 69 percent of the samples tested. Antibiotics were found in few samples.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 18, 2002

Coal provides over half of our nation’s electrical energy needs. To gain a better understanding of available energy resources, the USGS has recently completed an assessment of one of our nation’s most important coal producing regions, the Illinois Basin (an area covering Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky).

USGS
October 18, 2002

Coal provides over half of our nation’s electrical energy needs. To gain a better understanding of available energy resources, the USGS has recently completed an assessment of one of our nation’s most important coal producing regions, the Illinois Basin (an area covering Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky).

USGS
September 9, 2002

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its cooperators are launching a 5-year study in the Great Lakes basin to identify and map unprotected areas of substantial richness in aquatic animal species, and to determine how free those habitats are from human disturbance.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 18, 2002

 

 

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 5.0 near Darmstadt, Ind., on June 18, 2002 at 12:37 p.m. CDT. The earthquake’s epicenter was located about 10 miles northwest of Evansville, Ind., but the temblor was felt as far away as West Virginia.

USGS
June 18, 2002

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 5.0 near Darmstadt, Ind., on June 18, 2002 at 12:37 p.m. CDT. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 18, 2001

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is participating in nine of the 14 public workshops scheduled by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) this fall. The Corps of Engineers is conducting the workshops and a series of hearings to receive public comment on their recently released Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement to the Master Water Control Manual for the Missouri River system.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 5, 2001

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Madison, Wisc., said today that two dead crows, found in the Chicago area tested positive for the West Nile Virus. Last week, dead crows found near Milwaukee also tested positive for the virus. So far this year, West Nile Virus has been identified in 20 states, the District of Columbia and in southern Ontario.

USGS
September 5, 2001

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Madison, Wisc., said today that two dead crows, found in the Chicago area tested positive for the West Nile Virus. Last week, dead crows found near Milwaukee also tested positive for the virus. So far this year, West Nile Virus has been identified in 20 states, the District of Columbia and in southern Ontario.